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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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Application of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis in studies of the epidemiology of Listeria monocytogenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220463
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B. Nørrung
N. Skovgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrophoresis, Starch Gel
Enzymes - genetics - isolation & purification
Fishes
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - enzymology - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Sheep
Abstract
A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. These strains were isolated from human and animal cases of listeriosis as well as from different kinds of raw and processed foods. Thirty-three electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified among the 245 strains. The strains investigated included all human clinical strains isolated in Denmark during 1989 and 1990. Seventy-three percent of the strains isolated in this period were assigned to one of only two ETs (ET 1 and ET 4). ET 1, which was found to be the most frequently occurring ET among strains isolated from human clinical cases, was also found to occur rather frequently in animal clinical cases. ET 1 was, however, found only sporadically among strains isolated from foods and food factories. The data indicate that there might be something distinctive about the physiology or ecology of the ET 1 clone which makes it more likely to bring about disease in human beings either because of high pathogenicity or because of a special ability to multiply to infectious doses in processed foods. Another type, designated ET 4, was found to be the next most frequently occurring ET, after ET 1, among human clinical isolates. This could be explained by the fact that ET 4 was found to be the most frequently occurring ET within food isolates.
Notes
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
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Cites: J Infect. 1990 May;20(3):251-92341735
PubMed ID
8215357 View in PubMed
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Canadian listeriosis reference service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169874
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006;3(1):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Franco Pagotto
Lai-King Ng
Clifford Clark
Jeff Farber
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Products and Food Branch, Ontario, Canada. Franco_Pagotto@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006;3(1):132-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Databases, Factual
Disease Notification
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Public Health
Virulence
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes, a psychrotrophic organism capable of growing at refrigeration temperatures, is of major concern in extended shelf life, refrigerated foods. Considering that as much as 80-90% of human listeriosis cases are linked to the ingestion of contaminated food, human cases are predominantly seen in high-risk individuals, including organ-transplant recipients, patients with AIDS and HIV-infected individuals, pregnant women, cancer patients, and the elderly. In 2001, the Canadian Listeriosis Reference Service (LRS) was created by the Bureau of Microbial Hazards (Health Canada) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (now part of the Public Health Agency of Canada). Major goals of the LRS include investigation of listeriosis cases and maintenance of a national collection of isolates. The LRS intends to create a comprehensive molecular epidemiological database of all isolates in Canada for use as a resource for outbreak investigations, research and other microbiological investigations. The PFGE profiles are being established and stored for clinical, food, environmental, and possibly animal strains of L. monocytogenes. The LRS pursues research activities for investigation and implementation of other molecular methods for characterizing L. monocytogenes isolates. Ribotyping, Multi-locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR), Multi-locus virulence sequence typing (MLVA), microarray- based technologies and sequence-based typing schemes, are being investigated on selected diversity sets. The LRS has also used PFGE typing for outbreak investigations. The molecular epidemiological data, timely coordination and exchange of information should help to reduce the incidence of listeriosis in Canada. In Canada, listeriosis is not a national notifiable disease, except for the province of Quebec, where it has been since 1999. The LRS, Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network, and federal epidemiologists are currently working on making human listeriosis notifiable throughout Canada.
PubMed ID
16602988 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of Danish isolates of Listeria monocytogenes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224603
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Nørrung
Author Affiliation
Institute of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Animals
Bacteriophage Typing
Cluster analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrophoresis, Starch Gel
Enzymes - analysis - genetics
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - enzymology - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Meat - microbiology
Milk - microbiology
Serotyping
Sewage
Abstract
A total of 84 strains of Listeria monocytogenes were analysed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis at twelve enzyme loci. Eight enzyme loci were polymorphic with between 2 and 4 alleles per locus. Fourteen electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified. Among 62 human clinical isolates from Denmark, 8 different ETs were defined. Two ETs, designated ET 1 and ET 6, accounted for 77% of the human clinical isolates investigated. These ETs are identical with those responsible for several epidemics in Switzerland and in the United States. Comparison of 58 isolates of L. monocytogenes, typed by MEE, in relation to phage typing showed that phage typing was more discriminatory than MEE. The ability of MEE to distinguish between phage types of Epi-type and other phage types, however, was almost optimal. MEE typed 23 of 24 strains of Epi-type as belonging to ET 1. In contrast ET 1 was not found in 26 strains with phage types other than the Epi-type.
PubMed ID
1622759 View in PubMed
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Health risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211732
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1996 Jun;30(1-2):145-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
J M Farber
W H Ross
J. Harwig
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Directorate, Sir F.G. Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. jfarber@hpb.hwc ca
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1996 Jun;30(1-2):145-56
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Food Microbiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
In this review, the major steps used in the formulation of a health risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in foods are discussed. Data is given on the numbers of human listeriosis cases reported in Canada along with the current Canadian regulatory policy on L. monocytogenes. Four major steps in the health risk assessment of this organism in foods, namely, hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment and risk characterization, were examined. For hazard characterization, since it is known that no direct human dose response data is available for L.monocytogenes, a flexible dose response model called the Weibull-Gamma model was evaluated. For the exposure assessment, pâté and soft cheese, both high-risk foods in terms of listeriosis infection, were used as prototypes in some of the models that were used. Using disappearance data for cheese and 100 g as a typical serving, the data suggested an average of 102 servings per capita, per year in Canada. As a rough approximation, for L. monocytogenes, reference ID10 and ID90 dose levels of response for both normal and high risk populations were given as 10(7) and 10(9) for normal individuals, and 10(5) and 10(7) for high-risk people. The corresponding dose response models were graphically displayed. These models exhibited a higher degree of susceptibility and less host/pathogen heterogeneity for the higher risk group. The range of doses between the ID10 and ID90 reference values corresponded roughly to levels associated with cases of listeriosis. In the risk characterization stage, dose response data was combined with some predictive growth modeling data of L. monocytogenes on pâté, assuming an initial exposure of a single cell for food stored at 4 degrees and 8 degrees C. Storage of pâté at 4 degrees C for more than 35 days resulted in a rapidly increasing risk for the high risk population, while storage at 8 degrees C produced a similar risk after about 13 days. In addition, an equation, used to calculate the average probability of acquiring human listeriosis in Canada from soft and semi-soft cheese consumption, was formulated. Computations derived from this equation indicated a substantial level consistency between reported data and assumptions of the risk assessment model. An important part of risk characterization or possibly risk management is characterizing the economic and social consequences of estimated risks. The total annual estimated cost of listeriosis illnesses and deaths in Canada was estimated to be between 11.1 and 12.6 million dollars.
PubMed ID
8856380 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes isolates from invasive infections: variation of sero- and genotypes during an 11-year period in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185899
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Maria Miettinen
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Hannu Korkeala
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes strains that were isolated from 314 human listeriosis cases in Finland during an 11-year period were analyzed by O:H serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Serotyping divided the isolates into five serotypes, the most common being 1/2a (53%) and 4b (27%). During the study period, the number of cases caused by serotype 1/2a increased from 22% in 1990 to 67% in 2001, and those caused by serotype 4b decreased from 61 to 27%, respectively. PFGE with restriction enzyme AscI divided the strains into 81 PFGE genotypes; among strains of serotypes 1/2a and 4b, 49 and 18 PFGE types were seen, respectively. PFGE type 1 (serotype 1/2a) was the most prevalent single type (37 strains). Together with six other, closely related PFGE types, PFGE type 1 formed a group of 71 strains, representing 23% of all 314 strains. Strains of PFGE type 1 have also been isolated from cold smoked fish, suggesting a source of human infections caused by this type. Moreover, PFGE type 24 (serotype 1/2c) was significantly associated with gender: 5% of 180 male subjects but none of 132 female subjects (P = 0.012). An electronic database library was created from the PFGE profiles to make possible the prompt detection of new emerging profiles and the tracing of potential infection clusters in the future.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12682162 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):795-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-2008
Author
Robert Bortolussi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. bob.bortolussi@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):795-7
Date
Oct-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Meat-Packing Industry - standards
Risk assessment
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 27;308(4):203-66401354
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1996 Jun;30(1-2):145-568856380
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PubMed ID
18787096 View in PubMed
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[Listeriosis--selected aspects of laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225145
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 1992;46(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D. Kuklinska
M. Chodorowska
Author Affiliation
Zaklad Bakteriologii Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, Warszawie.
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 1992;46(3):187-94
Date
1992
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Poland - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This review presents distribution of human listeriosis in the world including the large food-borne outbreaks in USA and Canada with the rising number of cases especially in Europe. Usefulness of food examination for L. monocytogenes is discussed. Methods for differentiation L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other genera are presented.
PubMed ID
1296243 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201835
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
M K Miettinen
A. Siitonen
P. Heiskanen
H. Haajanen
K J Björkroth
H J Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. msjoman@vetmed.helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Fever
Finland - epidemiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Serotyping
Abstract
Febrile gastroenteritis in five healthy persons was associated with the consumption of vacuum-packed cold-smoked rainbow trout containing Listeria monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes isolates from the incriminated fish product lot and the stool samples were all of serotype 1/2a and were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis employing AscI and SmaI.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 27;308(4):203-66401354
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Feb 14;312(7):404-73918263
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Sep 29;319(13):823-83137471
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1991 May;57(5):1523-71906700
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1994 Sep;170(3):693-68077731
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1999 Jan;65(1):150-59872773
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Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 Aug;16(8):827-89271054
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-79350756
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1996 Aug;31(1-3):59-688880297
PubMed ID
10364616 View in PubMed
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Molecular Typing and Epidemiology of Human Listeriosis Cases, Denmark, 2002-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278265
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 Apr;22(4):625-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anne Kvistholm Jensen
Jonas T Björkman
Steen Ethelberg
Kristoffer Kiil
Michael Kemp
Eva Møller Nielsen
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 Apr;22(4):625-33
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clone Cells
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food Microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Molecular Epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Phylogeny
Serotyping
Abstract
Denmark has a high incidence of invasive listeriosis (0.9 cases/100,000 population in 2012). We analyzed patient data, clinical outcome, and trends in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated in Denmark during 2002-2012. We performed 2-enzyme PFGE and serotyping on 559 isolates and MLST on 92 isolates and identified some correlation between molecular type and clinical outcome and patient characteristics. We found 178 different PFGE types, but isolates from 122 cases belonged to just 2 closely related PFGE types, clonal complex 8 and sequence type 8. These 2 types were the main cause of a peak in incidence of invasive listeriosis during 2005-2009, possibly representing an outbreak or the presence of a highly prevalent clone. However, current typing methods could not fully confirm these possibilities, highlighting the need for more refined discriminatory typing methods to identify outbreaks within frequently occurring L. monocytogenes PFGE types.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26982714 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.