Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Does sporadic Listeria gastroenteritis exist? A 2-year population-based survey in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173287
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Sep 15;41(6):778-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2005
Author
Walter F Schlech
Heather Haldane
Timothy L Mailman
Michelle Warhuus
Nigel Crouse
David J M Haldane
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. wfsiii@dal.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Sep 15;41(6):778-84
Date
Sep-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Febrile gastroenteritis due to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) has been primarily described in foodborne outbreaks. We decided to determine the incidence of sporadic, febrile gastroenteritis due to LM in a large, well-defined North American population over a 2-year period and to compare these cases to sporadic cases of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections occurring concurrently in the community.
From 1 September 2002 through 31 August 2004, all stool specimens submitted for evaluation of diarrheal illness to a public health laboratory and to a children's hospital serving a population of approximately 350,000 were examined for the presence of Listeria species. Patients identified as having LM in their stool samples were matched with 2 temporally-matched patients with cultures positive for Campylobacter and Salmonella species. Patients with LM and control patients were contacted by telephone, and they answered a questionnaire that examined clinical features and risk factors for diarrheal illness.
A total of 7775 stool specimens were submitted during the period 1 September 2002-31 August 2004. Thirty-nine Listeria species were recovered. Seventeen of the species were LM, 13 were Listeria innocua, 3 were Listeria welshimeri, 1 was Listeria grayi, and 4 were other species. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results demonstrated no temporal or other clusters, and no seasonality was noted for isolates of LM. Preexisting gastrointestinal problems were much more common in patients with LM (P=.001) than in patients with Campylobacter or Salmonella infections.
Sporadic gastroenteritis due to LM appears to be an uncommon illness, and routine screening of stool samples for LM remains unwarranted. Preexisting gastrointestinal disease may be a risk factor for infection of the gastrointestinal tract with LM.
PubMed ID
16107973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early detection of disease outbreaks using the Internet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151553
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Apr 14;180(8):829-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2009
Author
Kumanan Wilson
John S Brownstein
Author Affiliation
The Ottawa Hospital, ON, Canada. kwilson@ohri.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Apr 14;180(8):829-31
Date
Apr-14-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet - utilization
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
Cites: AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2006;:244-817238340
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):150-718096908
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Mar 25;5(3):e7218366250
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2008 Feb 7;13(6). pii: 803318445424
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Jul 1;179(1):44-818556329
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2001 Jul 27;50(RR-13):1-35; quiz CE1-718634202
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Jul 8;5(7):e15118613747
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Dec 1;47(11):1443-818954267
Cites: Nature. 2009 Feb 19;457(7232):1012-419020500
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2000 Mar-Apr;6(2):97-10210756142
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2001 Dec;1(5):345-5311871807
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2004 Mar-Apr;11(2):141-5014633933
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 15;39(2):227-3215307032
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 1997 Nov;47(1-2):31-49506388
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2006 Jan-Feb;97(1):42-416512327
Cites: Biosecur Bioterror. 2006;4(3):293-30016999590
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Oct 1;229(7):1090-917014355
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Oct 19;355(16):1741-217050904
PubMed ID
19364791 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden during half a century (1958-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259026
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
G. Lopez-Valladares
W. Tham
V Singh Parihar
S. Helmersson
B. Andersson
S. Ivarsson
C. Johansson
H. Ringberg
I. Tjernberg
B. Henriques-Normark
M-L Danielsson-Tham
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Salmon
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Serotyping - methods
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes (n = 932) isolated in Sweden during 1958-2010 from human patients with invasive listeriosis were characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (AscI). Of the 932 isolates, 183 different PFGE types were identified, of which 83 were each represented by only one isolate. In all, 483 serovar 1/2a isolates were distributed over 114 PFGE types; 90 serovar 1/2b isolates gave 32 PFGE types; 21 serovar 1/2c isolates gave nine PFGE types; three serovar 3b isolates gave one PFGE type; and, 335 serovar 4b isolates gave 31 PFGE types. During the 1980s in Sweden, several serovar 4b cases were associated with the consumption of European raw soft cheese. However, as cheese-production hygiene has improved, the number of 4b cases has decreased. Since 1996, serovar 1/2a has been the dominant L. monocytogenes serovar in human listeriosis in Sweden. Therefore, based on current serovars and PFGE types, an association between human cases of listeriosis and the consumption of vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked salmon is suggested.
PubMed ID
24480252 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Intrauterine zoonotic infections in Dagestan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204199
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
G V Sultanov
M S Saidov
Author Affiliation
Daghestan Medical Academy, Makhachkala.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Brucellosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dagestan - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Meat-Packing Industry
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Poultry
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Toxoplasmosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
As the result of the prospective examination of 863 pregnant women in urban and rural consultation clinics for women in Daghestan, a high proportion of them were found to be infected with toxoplasmosis (25.5%), brucellosis (1.85%) and listeriosis (12.2%). The data on the contamination of 1325 women with aggravated obstetric history were confidently higher, constituting 52.0%, 3.3% and 22.2% respectively. The results of the examination of women working on live-stock farms (226 women) and poultry farms (106 women) demonstrated a significantly high frequency of contamination with the above-mentioned zoonotic infections. The data thus obtained were indicative of the necessity of organizing epidemiological surveillance on these infections; for their diagnostics a complex of laboratory methods could be used, though the effectiveness of these methods was different in different nosological forms.
PubMed ID
9783397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Investigation of increased listeriosis revealed two fishery production plants with persistent Listeria contamination in Finland in 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259027
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
U-M Nakari
L. Rantala
A. Pihlajasaari
S. Toikkanen
T. Johansson
C. Hellsten
S M Raulo
M. Kuusi
A. Siitonen
R. Rimhanen-Finne
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2261-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fisheries
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Listeria - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Registries
Risk assessment
Abstract
In 2010, a marked increase in listeriosis incidence was observed in Finland. Listeria monocytogenes PFGE profile 96 was responsible for one-fifth of the reported cases and a cluster of PFGE profile 62 was also detected. Investigations revealed two fishery production plants with persistent Listeria contamination. It appears likely that the plants were at least partly responsible for the increase of listeriosis. Epidemiological investigation revealed that 57% (31/54) of cases with underlying immunosuppressive condition or medication reported eating gravad or cold-smoked fish. Two public notices were issued by THL and Evira informing which groups were most at risk from the effects of listeriosis and should therefore be cautious in consuming certain products. Systematic sampling of foods and adequate epidemiological investigation methods are required to identify the sources of Listeria infections. Continuous control measures at fishery production plants producing risk products are essential.
PubMed ID
24476659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lineage II (Serovar 1/2a and 1/2c) Human Listeria monocytogenes Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Types Divided into PFGE Groups Using the Band Patterns Below 145.5?kb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286546
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Gloria Lopez-Valladares
Marie-Louise Danielsson-Tham
Richard V Goering
Wilhelm Tham
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Serogroup
Serotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Among 504 clinical lineage II isolates of Listeria monocytogenes isolated during 1958-2010 in Sweden, 119 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types (AscI) have been identified based on the number and distribution of all banding patterns in each DNA profile. In this study, these types were further divided into PFGE groups based on the configuration of small bands with sizes 145.5?kb.
PubMed ID
27860487 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 2000;116(19):2111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
A. Siitonen
T. Johansson
S. Lukinmaa
J. Mikkola
P. Ruutu
Author Affiliation
Kansanterveyslaitos, infektioepidemiologian osasto Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki. outi.lyytikainen@ktl.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2000;116(19):2111-8
Date
2000
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology - prevention & control
Humans
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk factors
PubMed ID
12017732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outbreak of listeriosis caused by infected beef meat from a meals-on-wheels delivery in Denmark 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145220
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Jan;17(1):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
B. Smith
J T Larsson
M. Lisby
L. Müller
S B Madsen
J. Engberg
J. Bangsborg
S. Ethelberg
M. Kemp
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. bgs@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Jan;17(1):50-2
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Services
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - physiology
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Meat - microbiology
Middle Aged
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Denmark occurred in May 2009. Multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis typing, later confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing, showed that isolates from eight patients had identical patterns and were distinguishable from Listeria monocytogenes isolates from other Danish patients. Seven out of eight patients had received a meal with beef from the same meals-on-wheels delivery catering company 3 weeks prior to onset of disease. Two patients died of their infection. Large-scale delivery of precooked meals to a vulnerable population represents a threat if proper measures against listeriosis are not taken.
PubMed ID
20184622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quantitative risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in smoked or gravad salmon and rainbow trout in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197562
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Jul 15;58(3):181-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2000
Author
R. Lindqvist
A. Westöö
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. roli@slv.se
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Jul 15;58(3):181-96
Date
Jul-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Food Microbiology
Hazardous Substances - standards
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - immunology - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Models, Biological
Monte Carlo Method
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Salmon - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to develop a quantitative risk assessment model in which the exposure and risk of acquiring listeriosis from consumption of packaged smoked or gravad salmon and rainbow trout were estimated. An Excel spreadsheet model was constructed in which variables were represented by distributions based on surveys of L. monocytogenes in these food products, and on demographic and consumption data. Growth or inactivation was not included in the model. The model was run through Monte Carlo simulations using the @Risk software (Palisade Corporation). The probability of illness per serving was calculated using two dose-response models from the literature. The first was an exponential model in which the species specific constant R, that helps define the dose-response curve, previously has been estimated to be 1.18 x 10(-10) based on German data (GR). In this study, R was estimated to 5.6 x 10(-10) based on Swedish data. The second model was a flexible Weibull-Gamma model (WG), with different coefficients for high- and low-risk groups. The exponential model (GR), although conservative and generally overestimating the risk, still predicted a lower probability of illness than the WG-model. The estimated mean risk per serving was 2.8 x 10(-5) (GR, high-risk group), 2.0 x 10(-3) (WG, low-risk group) and 0.016 (WG, high-risk group), respectively. The average number of reported listeriosis cases in Sweden is 37 per year. In comparison, the mean number of annual cases predicted by the risk assessment model was 168 (range 47 to 2800, GR, high-risk group), and 95 000 (range 34 000 to 1.6 x 10(6), WG high-risk group), respectively. If 1 to 10% (uniform distribution) of strains, instead of all, were considered virulent, the mean number of predicted cases would decrease to nine (GR) and 5200 (WG), respectively. The mean annual cumulative individual risk in the high-risk group based on a monthly exposure was estimated to be 4.0 x 10(-4) (range 8.0 x 10(-8) to 5.4 x 10(-3), GR). This risk increased to 1.5 x 10(-3) (range 1.7 x 10(-5) to 9.2 x 10(-3), GR) based on a weekly exposure. The risk assessment model was most sensitive to the input distribution describing the level of contamination and to a lesser degree on the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, the proportion of virulent strains, and serving sizes. A lack of data on the prevalence and concentration of L. monocytogenes in these products, dose-response data and quantitative information on the proportion of virulent strains were identified.
PubMed ID
10939268 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.