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[Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated in Russia and their typing using pulse electrophoresis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212008
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):60-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
B I Marakusha
K. Darwich
I S Tartakovskii
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 May-Jun;(3):60-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques - statistics & numerical data
Chromosomes, Bacterial - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Mice
Restriction Mapping
Russia
Sewage - microbiology
Virulence
Abstract
On the basis of specially developed scheme for the isolation of Listeria strains comprising 2 enrichment stages and the use of growth inhibitors, 128 L. monocytogenes cultures were isolated from clinical material, foodstuffs and sewage water. Highly virulent L.monocytogenes strains isolated from clinical material belonged to serovar 4b (54%) and 1/2a (38%), while those isolated from foodstuffs and sewage water belonged to 4b (74%). The restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA of the isolated cultures with the use of restrictase EcoR1 on the basis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) made it possible to distinguish Listeria strains in accordance with 5 types of restrictograms. The restrictograms of highly virulent L. monocytogenes strains, serovar 4b, belonged to types 1 and 2, while those of L. monocytogenes strains, serovar 1/2a, belonged to types 2 and 3. The comparative use of different methods for typing L. monocytogenes (sero-, phago-, bio- and resistotyping, the analysis of plasmid composition and restriction analysis) revealed that the combination of serotyping and restriction analysis on the basis of PFGE proved to be most promising for the characterization of the isolated L. monocytogenes strains and the assessment of their epidemic importance.
PubMed ID
8771733 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cold growth behaviour and genetic comparison of Canadian and Swiss Listeria monocytogenes strains associated with the food supply chain and human listeriosis cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256814
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Carolina Arguedas-Villa
Jovana Kovacevic
Kevin J Allen
Roger Stephan
Taurai Tasara
Author Affiliation
Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Canada
Food chain
Food Microbiology
Food Supply
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Phylogeny
Switzerland
Temperature
Abstract
Sixty-two strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Canada and Switzerland were investigated. Comparison based on molecular genotypes confirmed that strains in these two countries are genetically diverse. Interestingly strains from both countries displayed similar range of cold growth phenotypic profiles. Based on cold growth lag phase duration periods displayed in BHI at 4??C, the strains were similarly divided into groups of fast, intermediate and slow cold adaptors. Overall Swiss strains had faster exponential cold growth rates compared to Canadian strains. However gene expression analysis revealed no significant differences between fast and slow cold adapting strains in the ability to induce nine cold adaptation genes (lmo0501, cspA, cspD, gbuA, lmo0688, pgpH, sigB, sigH and sigL) in response to cold stress exposure. Neither was the presence of Stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1) analysed by PCR associated with enhanced cold adaptation. Phylogeny based on the sigL gene subdivided strains from these two countries into two major and one minor cluster. Fast cold adaptors were more frequently in one of the major clusters (cluster A), whereas slow cold adaptors were mainly in the other (cluster B). Genetic differences between these two major clusters are associated with various amino acid substitutions in the predicted SigL proteins. Compared to the EGDe type strain and most slow cold adaptors, most fast cold adaptors exhibited five identical amino acid substitutions (M90L, S203A/S203T, S304N, S315N, and I383T) in their SigL proteins. We hypothesize that these amino acid changes might be associated with SigL protein structural and functional changes that may promote differences in cold growth behaviour between L.?monocytogenes strains.
PubMed ID
24549201 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparative investigations of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from a turkey processing plant, turkey products, and from human cases of listeriosis in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196333
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Oct;125(2):303-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
B. Ojeniyi
J. Christensen
M. Bisgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Oct;125(2):303-8
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Disinfection
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food Contamination
Humans
Hygiene
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Poultry Diseases - microbiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Serotyping
Turkeys - microbiology
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from critical control points in a Danish turkey processing plant, from turkey products and from cases of human listeriosis. During processing in the plant the prevalence of L. monocytogenes ranged from 25.9 to 41.4%. Cleaning and disinfection decreased the prevalence to 6.4%. Isolates of L. monocytogenes were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using restriction endonuclease ApaI. Identical DNA types were obtained from turkey products and the processing line even after cleaning and disinfection. Two identical DNA types were demonstrated among isolates from turkey products and human cases of listeriosis. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes in turkey products ranged from 7.3 to 17.4% for ready-to-eat products and raw products, respectively. Since none of the 27 flocks examined before slaughter sampled positive for L. monocytogenes and the prevalence increased during processing, the potential risk from turkey meat was apparently due to factory hygiene rather than intrinsic contamination of the turkeys.
PubMed ID
11117953 View in PubMed
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[Differentiantion of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated in the Far East and European part of Russia on the basis of polymorphism of genes encoding invasion factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152832
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2008 Nov-Dec;(6):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Zaitseva
K R Beliaev
I Iu Egorova
A I Suniaikin
N M Pukhovskaia
Iu S Musatov
L I Ivanov
D V Kolbasov
G P Somov
A L Gintsburg
S A Ermolaeva
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2008 Nov-Dec;(6):10-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Ribose-Phosphate Pyrophosphokinase - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Forty Listeria monocytogenes isolates obtained in European and Far East regions of Russia were differentiated on the basis of polymorphism of 5 markergenes. Total length of concatemers obtained after sequencing of internal fragments of genes inlA, inlB, inlC, inlE and prs was 3029 b.p. Comparative analysis of concatemers' sequences revealed 237 variable nucleotides. Totally, 25 sequence types were revealed, and isolates from European and Far East regions belonged to different types. On the dendrogram isolates split on 2 clusters, which correspond to early described phylogenetic lines of L. monocytogenes specie. Isolates obtained in European and Far East regions formed independent subclusters within main clusters. Fifteen clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes belonged to 7 different types. Analysis of epidemiologic data on time and place of isolates obtaining suggested that isolates of the same sequence type are epidemiologically related and might represent one strain; index of discrimination for proposed typing method was calculated as 0.982.
PubMed ID
19186537 View in PubMed
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Distribution and characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from surface waters of the South Nation River watershed, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162464
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Sep;73(17):5401-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Emilie Lyautey
David R Lapen
Graham Wilkes
Katherine McCleary
Franco Pagotto
Kevin Tyler
Alain Hartmann
Pascal Piveteau
Aurélie Rieu
William J Robertson
Diane T Medeiros
Thomas A Edge
Victor Gannon
Edward Topp
Author Affiliation
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1391 Sandford Street, London, Ontario, Canada N5V 4T3.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Sep;73(17):5401-10
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Culture Media
Ecosystem
Genotype
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ontario
Phenotype
Rivers - microbiology
Seasons
Social Planning
Urban Renewal
Virulence - genetics
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen thought to be widely distributed in the environment. We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of L. monocytogenes isolates from surface waters derived from catchments within the South Nation River watershed (Ontario, Canada). This watershed is dominated by urban and rural development, livestock and crop production, and wildlife habitats. From June to November 2005, a total of 314 surface water samples were collected biweekly from 22 discrete sampling sites characterized by various upstream land uses. Presumptive Listeria spp. were isolated using a selective enrichment and isolation procedure, and 75 L. monocytogenes isolates were identified based on colony morphology, hemolytic activity, and amplification of three pathogenicity genes: iap, inlA, and hlyA. Thirty-two of 314 (10%) surface water samples were positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes, but detection ranged between 0 and 27% depending on the sampling date. Isolates belonging to serovar group 1/2a, 3a (50%) and group 4b, 4d, 4e (32%) were dominant. L. monocytogenes populations were resolved into 13 EcoRI ribotypes and 21 ApaI and 21 AscI pulsotypes. These had Simpson indexes of discrimination of up to 0.885. Lineage I-related isolates were dominant (61%) during the summer, whereas lineage II isolates were dominant (77%) in the fall. Isolates were, on average, resistant to 6.1 +/- 2.1 antibiotics out of 17 tested. Half of the L. monocytogenes isolates exhibited potential virulence linked to the production of a functional internalin A, and some isolates were found to be moderately to highly virulent by in vitro Caco-2 plaque formation assay (up to 28% of entry). There was a statistically significant link between the occurrence of L. monocytogenes and proximity to an upstream dairy farm and degree of cropped land. Our data indicate that L. monocytogenes is widespread in the studied catchments, where it could represent a public health issue related to agricultural land use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17630309 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diversity of Listeria monocytogenes isolates of human and food origin studied by serotyping, automated ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179719
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2004 Jun;10(6):562-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
S. Lukinmaa
K. Aarnisalo
M-L Suihko
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2004 Jun;10(6):562-8
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Automation
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Finland - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Ribotyping
Serotyping
Abstract
Automated ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and serotyping were evaluated for the epidemiological study of isolates of Listeria monocytogenes collected in Finland in 1997-1999 from human blood (n = 116) and the food industry (n = 72). The isolates divided into six serotypes, 23 EcoRI ribotypes, 54 AscI PFGE types, and 57 final subtypes if all results were combined. The discrimination index of ribotyping was lower (0.873) than that of PFGE (0.946). Two final subtypes dominated among human isolates, and identical subtypes were also found among food industry isolates. All PFGE types were serotype-specific, whereas two ribotypes included isolates of two serotypes. Isolates of serotype 3a, involved in an outbreak in Finland in 1999, matched one of these ribotypes, which also included some food industry isolates of serotype 1/2a. Ribotyping with EcoRI would not have been sufficient to define the outbreak in Finland caused by serotype 3a isolates. Although ribotyping is applicable as the first method in outbreak situations, human and food isolates with identical ribotypes should be investigated further by PFGE.
PubMed ID
15191386 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genome sequencing identifies two nearly unchanged strains of persistent Listeria monocytogenes isolated at two different fish processing plants sampled 6 years apart.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261001
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 May;79(9):2944-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Anne Holch
Kristen Webb
Oksana Lukjancenko
David Ussery
Benjamin M Rosenthal
Lone Gram
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 May;79(9):2944-51
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Sequence
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics - isolation & purification
Denmark
Food Microbiology
Food Preservation
Food-Processing Industry
Genome, Bacterial - genetics
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique
Salmon - microbiology
Seafood - microbiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Time Factors
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne human-pathogenic bacterium that can cause infections with a high mortality rate. It has a remarkable ability to persist in food processing facilities. Here we report the genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains (N53-1 and La111) that were isolated 6 years apart from two different Danish fish processers. Both strains are of serotype 1/2a and belong to a highly persistent DNA subtype (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] type 9). We demonstrate using in silico analyses that both strains belong to the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) type ST121 that has been isolated as a persistent subtype in several European countries. The purpose of this study was to use genome analyses to identify genes or proteins that could contribute to persistence. In a genome comparison, the two persistent strains were extremely similar and collectively differed from the reference lineage II strain, EGD-e. Also, they differed markedly from a lineage I strain (F2365). On the proteome level, the two strains were almost identical, with a predicted protein homology of 99.94%, differing at only 2 proteins. No single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences were seen between the two strains; in contrast, N53-1 and La111 differed from the EGD-e reference strain by 3,942 and 3,471 SNPs, respectively. We included a persistent L. monocytogenes strain from the United States (F6854) in our comparisons. Compared to nonpersistent strains, all three persistent strains were distinguished by two genome deletions: one, of 2,472 bp, typically contains the gene for inlF, and the other, of 3,017 bp, includes three genes potentially related to bacteriocin production and transport (lmo2774, lmo2775, and the 3'-terminal part of lmo2776). Further studies of highly persistent strains are required to determine if the absence of these genes promotes persistence. While the genome comparison did not point to a clear physiological explanation of the persistent phenotype, the remarkable similarity between the two strains indicates that subtypes with specific traits are selected for in the food processing environment and that particular genetic and physiological factors are responsible for the persistent phenotype.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23435887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Listeria monocytogenes isolates from invasive infections: variation of sero- and genotypes during an 11-year period in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185899
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Maria Miettinen
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Hannu Korkeala
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes strains that were isolated from 314 human listeriosis cases in Finland during an 11-year period were analyzed by O:H serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Serotyping divided the isolates into five serotypes, the most common being 1/2a (53%) and 4b (27%). During the study period, the number of cases caused by serotype 1/2a increased from 22% in 1990 to 67% in 2001, and those caused by serotype 4b decreased from 61 to 27%, respectively. PFGE with restriction enzyme AscI divided the strains into 81 PFGE genotypes; among strains of serotypes 1/2a and 4b, 49 and 18 PFGE types were seen, respectively. PFGE type 1 (serotype 1/2a) was the most prevalent single type (37 strains). Together with six other, closely related PFGE types, PFGE type 1 formed a group of 71 strains, representing 23% of all 314 strains. Strains of PFGE type 1 have also been isolated from cold smoked fish, suggesting a source of human infections caused by this type. Moreover, PFGE type 24 (serotype 1/2c) was significantly associated with gender: 5% of 180 male subjects but none of 132 female subjects (P = 0.012). An electronic database library was created from the PFGE profiles to make possible the prompt detection of new emerging profiles and the tracing of potential infection clusters in the future.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12682162 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiological survey of Listeria monocytogenes in broilers and poultry products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186301
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2003;94(4):633-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
L M Rørvik
B. Aase
T. Alvestad
D A Caugant
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Microbiology and Food Hygiene, The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway. liv.m.rorvik@veths.no
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2003;94(4):633-40
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Chickens - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Meat-Packing Industry
Norway - epidemiology
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Poultry Products - microbiology
Prevalence
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry products, and to elucidate whether poultry products may be linked to listeriosis cases. A further goal was to identify contamination routes for L. monocytogenes to broiler carcasses.
Poultry products (385 samples) were screened for L. monocytogenes. The recovered isolates and 19 patient isolates were characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analysis. The poultry isolates showed great genetic diversity, but no identical subclones were identified from poultry sources and patients. One slaughterhouse was examined in detail during a 16-month period. The contamination rates increased along the processing line, and one subclone was found during the whole period. Only low prevalence of the bacteria was revealed from broiler faeces.
The prevalence of L. monocytogenes in poultry products was high, but no listeriosis cases was linked to poultry products. Broilers seem to be contaminated during the slaughter process, and specific strains may persist in the processing environment. Broiler faeces does not seem to be an important source of L. monocytogenes in poultry products.
Preventive measures to avoid contamination of poultry products by L. monocytogenes must be taken in the processing plants.
PubMed ID
12631199 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201835
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
M K Miettinen
A. Siitonen
P. Heiskanen
H. Haajanen
K J Björkroth
H J Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. msjoman@vetmed.helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Fever
Finland - epidemiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Serotyping
Abstract
Febrile gastroenteritis in five healthy persons was associated with the consumption of vacuum-packed cold-smoked rainbow trout containing Listeria monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes isolates from the incriminated fish product lot and the stool samples were all of serotype 1/2a and were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis employing AscI and SmaI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10364616 View in PubMed
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