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An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59040
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
A. Eklöw
M L Danielsson-Tham
S. Loncarevic
L O Mentzing
I. Persson
H. Unnerstad
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Obstetric labor, premature
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported.
PubMed ID
9350756 View in PubMed
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Challenges in listeriosis cluster and outbreak investigations, Province of Quebec, 1997-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106640
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Colette Gaulin
Geneviève Gravel
Sadjia Bekal
Andrea Currie
Danielle Ramsay
Sophie Roy
Author Affiliation
1 Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux , Québec, Québec, Canada .
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health authorities place a high priority on investigating listeriosis outbreaks, and these epidemiological investigations remain challenging. Some approaches have been described in the literature to address these challenges. This review of listeriosis clusters and outbreaks investigated in the Province of Quebec (Quebec) highlights investigative approaches that contributed to identifying the source of these outbreaks.
The Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec (LSPQ) implemented pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) molecular subtyping in 1997 to identify Listeria monocytogenes clusters among isolates from invasive listeriosis cases identified throughout Quebec. A cluster was defined as three cases or more with the same or similar PFGE profiles (=3 band difference) occurring over a 4-month period. An investigation was initiated if the epidemiologic indicators suggested a common source. Listeriosis data from LSPQ's database were reviewed to identify and describe clusters detected from 1997 to 2011, including those that led to an outbreak investigation. Epidemiological reports prepared following each outbreak were also reviewed.
Eleven clusters were identified in the province by LSPQ between 1997 and 2011. Outbreak investigations were initiated for six clusters, four of which involved more than 10 cases. Factors that contributed to identifying the source for three of these outbreaks highlighted the value of (1) making all stakeholders (food safety and inspection services, public health authorities, and laboratories) aware of any ongoing investigation and sharing relevant information even if the source is not yet identified; (2) promptly collecting food samples identified and considered as possible vehicles of infection identified during the interview of a Listeria case; (3) collecting food items and/or environmental samples in locations reported in common by cases in the same cluster.
Multiple approaches should be considered when investigating L. monocytogenes clusters. Networks to facilitate continuous exchange of human and food data between public health and food safety partners should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
24134667 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241209
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J W Davies
E P Ewan
P. Varughese
S E Acres
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - congenital - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Since its first isolation by Murray in 1926 Listeria monocytogenes has become recognized as a significant pathogen occurring worldwide and involving a wide range of wild and domestic animals including man. The first confirmed human listeriosis case in Canada was published by Stoot in 1951. A later survey based on records maintained at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa showed 101 cases detected over a 21 year period in nine provinces. The overall mortality was 30%. The most frequently isolated serotype was 4b followed by 1 and 1b. Prior to the Nova Scotia epidemic (41 cases) of 1981, fewer than 15 cases per annum had been diagnosed based on hospital discharge records. The Nova Scotia epidemic was unique in that the source and mode of transmission of the organism were determined. Sixty-three strains isolated from this outbreak were typed, and with the exception of one 1a strain, were identified as 4b. These were subsequently classified mainly as phage type 00 042 0000 and 00 002 0000. Listeriosis appears to be a common infection in the animal population in Canada primarily in cattle, sheep, chinchillas, chickens and goats. Outbreaks have been described in rabbits, goats, and chinchillas. Chinchilla farms were affected in one outbreak (serotype 1) in Nova Scotia which was attributed to feeding a new batch of meal containing beet pulp. Many aspects of the epidemiology of listeriosis are obscure. A cycle involving contaminated soil and consumption of raw vegetables has been confirmed as the cause of the Nova Scotia epidemic and could explain a proportion of the sporadic cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6442654 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254504
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1973
Author
E J Bowmer
J A McKiel
W H Cockcroft
N. Schmitt
D E Rappay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Date
Jul-21-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antigens, Bacterial
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes
Listeriosis - blood - cerebrospinal fluid - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - mortality
Male
Meningitis - etiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Rabbits - immunology
Sepsis - etiology
Skin Manifestations
Abstract
Between 1951 and January 1972 listeriosis was diagnosed bacteriologically in 101 Canadian patients. This study adds 80 cases to the 21 reported from Metropolitan Toronto by Sepp and Roy in 1963. The Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, collated epidemiological and clinical data. Serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes included 4b (53), 1 (15), 1b (6), 1a (2), 2 and 3. Clinically, 54 patients had meningitis and 23 septicemia. The mortality rate was 30%.Between 1954 and January 1972 listeriosis affected 15 British Columbian patients: nine were male and six female; 12 were less than 1 or more than 45 years old. Among the patients were a pregnant mother and the son to whom she gave premature birth. A day-old infant and an elderly man died.
Notes
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Cites: AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954 Apr;93(4):515-2713137627
PubMed ID
4198595 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes isolates from invasive infections: variation of sero- and genotypes during an 11-year period in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185899
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Maria Miettinen
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Hannu Korkeala
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes strains that were isolated from 314 human listeriosis cases in Finland during an 11-year period were analyzed by O:H serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Serotyping divided the isolates into five serotypes, the most common being 1/2a (53%) and 4b (27%). During the study period, the number of cases caused by serotype 1/2a increased from 22% in 1990 to 67% in 2001, and those caused by serotype 4b decreased from 61 to 27%, respectively. PFGE with restriction enzyme AscI divided the strains into 81 PFGE genotypes; among strains of serotypes 1/2a and 4b, 49 and 18 PFGE types were seen, respectively. PFGE type 1 (serotype 1/2a) was the most prevalent single type (37 strains). Together with six other, closely related PFGE types, PFGE type 1 formed a group of 71 strains, representing 23% of all 314 strains. Strains of PFGE type 1 have also been isolated from cold smoked fish, suggesting a source of human infections caused by this type. Moreover, PFGE type 24 (serotype 1/2c) was significantly associated with gender: 5% of 180 male subjects but none of 132 female subjects (P = 0.012). An electronic database library was created from the PFGE profiles to make possible the prompt detection of new emerging profiles and the tracing of potential infection clusters in the future.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12682162 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes: maternal-foetal infections in Denmark 1994-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91641
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(1):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Smith Birgitte
Kemp Michael
Ethelberg Steen
Schiellerup Peter
Bruun Brita G
Gerner-Smidt Peter
Christensen Jens J
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology, and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. BGS@SSI.dk
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(1):21-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - epidemiology
Pneumonia, Bacterial - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Pregnancy outcome
Risk factors
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal-foetal infection by Listeria monocytogenes is a rare complication in pregnancy. In the period 1994-2005, 37 culture-confirmed cases of maternal-foetal Listeria monocytogenes infections were reported in Denmark. We examined 36 patients' files in order to evaluate risk factors, clinical and laboratory findings, response to therapy, and outcome for maternal-foetal listeriosis. Patient data and bacteriological findings were divided into 2 groups for comparison: 1 group with children born alive (n=24) and another group with abortion or stillbirth (n=12). 23 of the 36 children survived the acute infection, as did all the mothers. The mothers were generally only mildly affected by the infection. In contrast, among the children born alive, 15 were diagnosed with bacteraemia/septicaemia, 3 children with pneumonia, 3 with neonatal meningitis, and 3 were unaffected. Despite the high frequency of illness only 1 of the live-born children died from the infection and none of the surviving children showed signs of permanent damage at the time they were discharged from hospital. Listeriosis during pregnancy is a serious threat to the unborn child. One-third of culture-confirmed cases of maternal-foetal infections resulted in abortion or stillbirth; however, the prognosis for live-born children is good, even in severely ill newborns.
PubMed ID
18855227 View in PubMed
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Listeriosis at Vancouver General Hospital, 1965-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243994
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1981
Author
A G Skidmore
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Date
Dec-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Alcoholism - complications
Canada
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sepsis - microbiology
Abstract
The records were reviewed of all patients treated at the Vancouver General Hospital over the 15 years from 1965 through 1979 for infections proved by culture to have been caused by Listeria monocytogenes. Although listeriosis is not common in humans, certain groups seem to be susceptible - immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, neonates and the elderly. All these groups were represented among the 22 cases reviewed. There were 17 adults, 3 of whom were pregnant women who had only a mild influenza-like illness. Of the remaining 14 adults 9 were immunocompromised and 5 apparently immunocompetent; 7 presented with meningitis and 7 with bacteremia only. Of the five infants with neonatal listeriosis, two had early-onset disease (bacteremia) and three had the late-onset form (meningitis). Seven patients were treated with penicillin alone, seven with ampicillin alone and eight with penicillin or ampicillin combined with kanamycin, gentamicin or chloramphenicol. There were eight deaths: several were directly attributable to the listeriosis, but in others the severity of the underlying illness was an important factor. Serotypes 1 and 4b were equally common among the 16 specimens of L. monocytogenes that were typed.
Notes
Cites: Bacteriol Rev. 1966 Jun;30(2):309-824956900
Cites: Appl Microbiol. 1971 Mar;21(3):516-94994904
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
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Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim4198595
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Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Br Emp. 1963 Jun;70:481-213972833
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1964 Aug 1;89:915-2314207559
PubMed ID
6800624 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.