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Challenges in listeriosis cluster and outbreak investigations, Province of Quebec, 1997-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106640
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Colette Gaulin
Geneviève Gravel
Sadjia Bekal
Andrea Currie
Danielle Ramsay
Sophie Roy
Author Affiliation
1 Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux , Québec, Québec, Canada .
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health authorities place a high priority on investigating listeriosis outbreaks, and these epidemiological investigations remain challenging. Some approaches have been described in the literature to address these challenges. This review of listeriosis clusters and outbreaks investigated in the Province of Quebec (Quebec) highlights investigative approaches that contributed to identifying the source of these outbreaks.
The Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec (LSPQ) implemented pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) molecular subtyping in 1997 to identify Listeria monocytogenes clusters among isolates from invasive listeriosis cases identified throughout Quebec. A cluster was defined as three cases or more with the same or similar PFGE profiles (=3 band difference) occurring over a 4-month period. An investigation was initiated if the epidemiologic indicators suggested a common source. Listeriosis data from LSPQ's database were reviewed to identify and describe clusters detected from 1997 to 2011, including those that led to an outbreak investigation. Epidemiological reports prepared following each outbreak were also reviewed.
Eleven clusters were identified in the province by LSPQ between 1997 and 2011. Outbreak investigations were initiated for six clusters, four of which involved more than 10 cases. Factors that contributed to identifying the source for three of these outbreaks highlighted the value of (1) making all stakeholders (food safety and inspection services, public health authorities, and laboratories) aware of any ongoing investigation and sharing relevant information even if the source is not yet identified; (2) promptly collecting food samples identified and considered as possible vehicles of infection identified during the interview of a Listeria case; (3) collecting food items and/or environmental samples in locations reported in common by cases in the same cluster.
Multiple approaches should be considered when investigating L. monocytogenes clusters. Networks to facilitate continuous exchange of human and food data between public health and food safety partners should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
24134667 View in PubMed
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Human isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden during half a century (1958-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259026
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
G. Lopez-Valladares
W. Tham
V Singh Parihar
S. Helmersson
B. Andersson
S. Ivarsson
C. Johansson
H. Ringberg
I. Tjernberg
B. Henriques-Normark
M-L Danielsson-Tham
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Salmon
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Serotyping - methods
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes (n = 932) isolated in Sweden during 1958-2010 from human patients with invasive listeriosis were characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (AscI). Of the 932 isolates, 183 different PFGE types were identified, of which 83 were each represented by only one isolate. In all, 483 serovar 1/2a isolates were distributed over 114 PFGE types; 90 serovar 1/2b isolates gave 32 PFGE types; 21 serovar 1/2c isolates gave nine PFGE types; three serovar 3b isolates gave one PFGE type; and, 335 serovar 4b isolates gave 31 PFGE types. During the 1980s in Sweden, several serovar 4b cases were associated with the consumption of European raw soft cheese. However, as cheese-production hygiene has improved, the number of 4b cases has decreased. Since 1996, serovar 1/2a has been the dominant L. monocytogenes serovar in human listeriosis in Sweden. Therefore, based on current serovars and PFGE types, an association between human cases of listeriosis and the consumption of vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked salmon is suggested.
PubMed ID
24480252 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241209
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J W Davies
E P Ewan
P. Varughese
S E Acres
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - congenital - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Since its first isolation by Murray in 1926 Listeria monocytogenes has become recognized as a significant pathogen occurring worldwide and involving a wide range of wild and domestic animals including man. The first confirmed human listeriosis case in Canada was published by Stoot in 1951. A later survey based on records maintained at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa showed 101 cases detected over a 21 year period in nine provinces. The overall mortality was 30%. The most frequently isolated serotype was 4b followed by 1 and 1b. Prior to the Nova Scotia epidemic (41 cases) of 1981, fewer than 15 cases per annum had been diagnosed based on hospital discharge records. The Nova Scotia epidemic was unique in that the source and mode of transmission of the organism were determined. Sixty-three strains isolated from this outbreak were typed, and with the exception of one 1a strain, were identified as 4b. These were subsequently classified mainly as phage type 00 042 0000 and 00 002 0000. Listeriosis appears to be a common infection in the animal population in Canada primarily in cattle, sheep, chinchillas, chickens and goats. Outbreaks have been described in rabbits, goats, and chinchillas. Chinchilla farms were affected in one outbreak (serotype 1) in Nova Scotia which was attributed to feeding a new batch of meal containing beet pulp. Many aspects of the epidemiology of listeriosis are obscure. A cycle involving contaminated soil and consumption of raw vegetables has been confirmed as the cause of the Nova Scotia epidemic and could explain a proportion of the sporadic cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6442654 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254504
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1973
Author
E J Bowmer
J A McKiel
W H Cockcroft
N. Schmitt
D E Rappay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Date
Jul-21-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antigens, Bacterial
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes
Listeriosis - blood - cerebrospinal fluid - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - mortality
Male
Meningitis - etiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Rabbits - immunology
Sepsis - etiology
Skin Manifestations
Abstract
Between 1951 and January 1972 listeriosis was diagnosed bacteriologically in 101 Canadian patients. This study adds 80 cases to the 21 reported from Metropolitan Toronto by Sepp and Roy in 1963. The Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, collated epidemiological and clinical data. Serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes included 4b (53), 1 (15), 1b (6), 1a (2), 2 and 3. Clinically, 54 patients had meningitis and 23 septicemia. The mortality rate was 30%.Between 1954 and January 1972 listeriosis affected 15 British Columbian patients: nine were male and six female; 12 were less than 1 or more than 45 years old. Among the patients were a pregnant mother and the son to whom she gave premature birth. A day-old infant and an elderly man died.
Notes
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PubMed ID
4198595 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes isolates from invasive infections: variation of sero- and genotypes during an 11-year period in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185899
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Maria Miettinen
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Hannu Korkeala
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1694-700
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes strains that were isolated from 314 human listeriosis cases in Finland during an 11-year period were analyzed by O:H serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Serotyping divided the isolates into five serotypes, the most common being 1/2a (53%) and 4b (27%). During the study period, the number of cases caused by serotype 1/2a increased from 22% in 1990 to 67% in 2001, and those caused by serotype 4b decreased from 61 to 27%, respectively. PFGE with restriction enzyme AscI divided the strains into 81 PFGE genotypes; among strains of serotypes 1/2a and 4b, 49 and 18 PFGE types were seen, respectively. PFGE type 1 (serotype 1/2a) was the most prevalent single type (37 strains). Together with six other, closely related PFGE types, PFGE type 1 formed a group of 71 strains, representing 23% of all 314 strains. Strains of PFGE type 1 have also been isolated from cold smoked fish, suggesting a source of human infections caused by this type. Moreover, PFGE type 24 (serotype 1/2c) was significantly associated with gender: 5% of 180 male subjects but none of 132 female subjects (P = 0.012). An electronic database library was created from the PFGE profiles to make possible the prompt detection of new emerging profiles and the tracing of potential infection clusters in the future.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12682162 View in PubMed
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Listeriosis in Iceland, 1978-2000: a description of cases and molecular epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31236
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(10):735-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Einar K Hjaltested
Sigrún Gudmundsdóttir
Kristín Jónsdóttir
Karl G Kristinsson
Olafur Steingrímsson
Már Kristjánsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(10):735-41
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Epidemiology, Molecular
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
The purpose of our study was to review all cases of listeriosis in Iceland during the period 1978-2000 and to analyse the genetic relatedness of their isolates. Case records of all patients in Iceland with listeriosis during the period were reviewed and the isolates compared using serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI, AseI and ApaI restriction enzymes. Forty cases of listeriosis were diagnosed during the period, resulting in a mean annual incidence of 6.9 cases per million and a case fatality rate of 33%. In the first 5 y of the study only serotype 4b was observed; subsequently serotypes 1/2a and 1/2b appeared and serotype 4b declined in prevalence. PFGE yielded 24 different genotypes with 7 clusters of indistinguishable genotypes, each comprising 2-6 cases. During 1992-95 the annual incidence of listeriosis in Iceland rose to 15 cases per million. This was largely due to 2 clusters, 1 of 3 cases and the other of 6. No cases of listeriosis were diagnosed during 1998-2000. Our data show an increased number of cases within clusters in the latter half of the period. At the same time, food processing and distribution has become increasingly centralized in Iceland, suggesting an increased risk of listeriosis outbreaks.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(1):79
PubMed ID
12477323 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.