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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a infections from butter in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198523
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
T. Autio
R. Maijala
P. Ruutu
T. Honkanen-Buzalski
M. Miettinen
M. Hatakka
J. Mikkola
V J Anttila
T. Johansson
L. Rantala
T. Aalto
H. Korkeala
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. outi.lyytikainen@ktl. fi.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
In February 1999, an outbreak of listeriosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a occurred in Finland. All isolates were identical. The outbreak strain was first isolated in 1997 in dairy butter. This dairy began delivery to a tertiary care hospital (TCH) in June 1998. From June 1998 to April 1999, 25 case patients were identified (20 with sepsis, 4 with meningitis, and 1 with abscess; 6 patients died). Patients with the outbreak strain were more likely to have been admitted to the TCH than were patients with other strains of L. monocytogenes (60% vs. 8%; odds ratio, 17.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.8-136.8). Case patients admitted to the TCH had been hospitalized longer before cultures tested positive than had matched controls (median, 31 vs. 10 days; P=.008). An investigation found the outbreak strain in packaged butter served at the TCH and at the source dairy. Recall of the product ended the outbreak.
PubMed ID
10823797 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59040
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
A. Eklöw
M L Danielsson-Tham
S. Loncarevic
L O Mentzing
I. Persson
H. Unnerstad
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Obstetric labor, premature
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported.
PubMed ID
9350756 View in PubMed
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Challenges in listeriosis cluster and outbreak investigations, Province of Quebec, 1997-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106640
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Colette Gaulin
Geneviève Gravel
Sadjia Bekal
Andrea Currie
Danielle Ramsay
Sophie Roy
Author Affiliation
1 Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux , Québec, Québec, Canada .
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health authorities place a high priority on investigating listeriosis outbreaks, and these epidemiological investigations remain challenging. Some approaches have been described in the literature to address these challenges. This review of listeriosis clusters and outbreaks investigated in the Province of Quebec (Quebec) highlights investigative approaches that contributed to identifying the source of these outbreaks.
The Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec (LSPQ) implemented pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) molecular subtyping in 1997 to identify Listeria monocytogenes clusters among isolates from invasive listeriosis cases identified throughout Quebec. A cluster was defined as three cases or more with the same or similar PFGE profiles (=3 band difference) occurring over a 4-month period. An investigation was initiated if the epidemiologic indicators suggested a common source. Listeriosis data from LSPQ's database were reviewed to identify and describe clusters detected from 1997 to 2011, including those that led to an outbreak investigation. Epidemiological reports prepared following each outbreak were also reviewed.
Eleven clusters were identified in the province by LSPQ between 1997 and 2011. Outbreak investigations were initiated for six clusters, four of which involved more than 10 cases. Factors that contributed to identifying the source for three of these outbreaks highlighted the value of (1) making all stakeholders (food safety and inspection services, public health authorities, and laboratories) aware of any ongoing investigation and sharing relevant information even if the source is not yet identified; (2) promptly collecting food samples identified and considered as possible vehicles of infection identified during the interview of a Listeria case; (3) collecting food items and/or environmental samples in locations reported in common by cases in the same cluster.
Multiple approaches should be considered when investigating L. monocytogenes clusters. Networks to facilitate continuous exchange of human and food data between public health and food safety partners should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
24134667 View in PubMed
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Exposure of Listeria monocytogenes within an epidemic caused by butter in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192207
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2001 Oct 22;70(1-2):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-2001
Author
R. Maijala
O. Lyytikäinen
T. Autio
T. Aalto
L. Haavisto
T. Honkanen-Buzalski
Author Affiliation
Risk Analysis, National Veterinary and Food Research Institute, Helsinki, Finland. riitta.maijala@eela.fi
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2001 Oct 22;70(1-2):97-109
Date
Oct-22-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butter - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Susceptibility
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Food Microbiology
Food Service, Hospital
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Length of Stay
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Data on the levels of bacteria and the amounts of food consumed in food-borne outbreaks provides an excellent opportunity to study the effects of exposure to Listeria monocytogenes. Between June 1998 and April 1999, an outbreak caused by L. monocytogenes serotype 3a in butter occurred in Finland. The majority of the cases were immunocompromised and hospitalized at the Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), where 7-g butter packages produced by a dairy plant were used as the only butter brand. The butter had also been sold to 10 other central hospitals as well as to the retail market. Based on the data on hospital stay, butter consumption and the qualitative and quantitative analyses of L. monocytogenes in butter, the attack rates and exposure were estimated. Incubation studies on the naturally contaminated small butter packages showed that the levels found in the packages at the time of detection of the outbreak could reliably be used for these estimations. However, the levels of L. monocytogenes in 500-g packages increased. The attack rate among HUCH patients varied from 70 to 117 cases per 1000 patients at risk, depending on which estimate of the contamination level of butter (100-60%) was used. The highest single dose (7.7 x 10(4) CFU in one meal) could have been sufficient to cause the listeriosis cases at HUCH. However, this data also supports another hypothesis, according to which these listeriosis cases were caused by a prolonged daily consumption of contaminated butter during the hospital stay. The estimated daily dose, based on the hospital kitchen data or the highest detected level in a wholesale sample (11,000 CFU/g), would have varied from 1.4 x 10(1) to 2.2 x 10(3) CFU/day or from 2.2 x 10(4) to 3.1 x 10(5) CFU/day, respectively. The choice of the hypothesis has a crucial impact on the interpretation of this data for the dose-response estimations as well as for the discussion on Food Safety Objectives. Due to the susceptibility of hospital patients, special care must be taken in order to avoid even low levels of L. monocytogenes in food served.
PubMed ID
11759767 View in PubMed
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Febrile gastroenteritis after eating on-farm manufactured fresh cheese--an outbreak of listeriosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13906
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
J J Carrique-Mas
I. Hökeberg
Y. Andersson
M. Arneborn
W. Tham
M L Danielsson-Tham
B. Osterman
M. Leffler
M. Steen
E. Eriksson
G. Hedin
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE-17182 Solna, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cheese - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis affected consumers of on-farm manufactured dairy products from a summer farm in Sweden. Symptoms included diarrhoea, fever, stomach cramps and vomiting in 88, 60, 54 and 21% of cases identified. The median incubation period was 31 h. A cohort study with 33 consumers showed an attack rate of 52% and an association between the total amount of product eaten and illness (P=0.07). Twenty-seven of 32 (84%) stool samples cultured for Listeria monocytogenes tested positive, although there was no association between clinical disease and the isolation of L. monocytogenes. In addition, gene sequences for VTEC and ETEC were detected in 6 and 1 subjects, respectively. Bacteriological analysis of cheese samples revealed heavy contamination with L. monocytogenes and coagulase positive staphylococci in all of them and gene markers for VTEC in one of them. Molecular profiles for L. monocytogenes isolated from dairy products, stool samples and an abscess from 1 patient who developed septic arthritis were identical. Results of both microbiological and epidemiological analyses point to L. monocytogenes as the most likely cause of this outbreak. The finding of markers for VTEC in some humans and cheese samples means that a mixed aetiology at least in some cases cannot be conclusively ruled out.
PubMed ID
12613748 View in PubMed
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First documented outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in Quebec, 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182950
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2003 Nov 1;29(21):181-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2003
Author
C. Gaulin
D. Ramsay
L. Ringuette
J. Ismaïl
Author Affiliation
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, Direction de la protection de la santé publique, Quebec City.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2003 Nov 1;29(21):181-6
Date
Nov-1-2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
PubMed ID
14603730 View in PubMed
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Investigations related to the epidemic strain involved in the French listeriosis outbreak in 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64594
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1995 Jun;61(6):2242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
C. Jacquet
B. Catimel
R. Brosch
C. Buchrieser
P. Dehaumont
V. Goulet
A. Lepoutre
P. Veit
J. Rocourt
Author Affiliation
Centre National de Référence des Listeria-World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Foodborne Listeriosis, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1995 Jun;61(6):2242-6
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Environmental Microbiology
Food Microbiology
France
Humans
Listeria Infections - epidemiology
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Two hundred seventy-nine cases of human listeriosis (92 pregnancy-related cases and 187 non-pregnancy-related cases) caused by a serovar 4b and phagovar 2389:2425:3274:2671:47:108:340 strain were identified in France between March and December 1992. Epidemiological investigations included a case-control study (not described here) and microbiological analyses of foods. Results of the case-control study and characterization of food isolates identified pork tongue in jelly, a ready-to-eat meat product, as the major vehicle of this outbreak, and to a lesser extent, delicatessen products contaminated secondarily during handling in food stores. As far as serotyping, phage typing, DNA macrorestriction pattern analysis (obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]), and ribotyping are concerned, this epidemic strain is phenotypically and genomically closely related to strains responsible for major outbreaks of listeriosis previously observed in Europe and North America. The epidemic strain sensu stricto as defined by PFGE (2/1/3) displayed the same serovar, phagovar, ribovar, and ApaI and NotI PFGE patterns as the epidemic strains from outbreaks in Switzerland, California, and Denmark, but it consistently showed differences in the SmaI PFGE profile. This information greatly contributed to the identification of the major food vehicle (pork tongue in jelly) and further allowed exclusion of other foods (cheese) as possible sources of this major listeriosis epidemic.
PubMed ID
7793944 View in PubMed
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Lineage II (Serovar 1/2a and 1/2c) Human Listeria monocytogenes Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Types Divided into PFGE Groups Using the Band Patterns Below 145.5?kb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286546
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Gloria Lopez-Valladares
Marie-Louise Danielsson-Tham
Richard V Goering
Wilhelm Tham
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Serogroup
Serotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Among 504 clinical lineage II isolates of Listeria monocytogenes isolated during 1958-2010 in Sweden, 119 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types (AscI) have been identified based on the number and distribution of all banding patterns in each DNA profile. In this study, these types were further divided into PFGE groups based on the configuration of small bands with sizes 145.5?kb.
PubMed ID
27860487 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes: a continuing challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194105
Source
Nutr Rev. 2001 Jun;59(6):183-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
C W Donnelly
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, The University of Vermont, Burlington, 05405, USA.
Source
Nutr Rev. 2001 Jun;59(6):183-94
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Disease Outbreaks
Food Contamination
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meat - microbiology - standards
Quality Control
Safety
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As a leading cause of death from a foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes continues to cause sporadic cases and outbreaks of illness. The most recent of these outbreaks in the United States involved consumption of hot dogs, with 101 cases of illness and 21 deaths reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the years 1998-1999. Epidemiologic analysis determined that contamination levels in hot dogs were remarkably low (0.3 CFU [colony-forming units] L monocytogenes serotype 4b/g). That same year, manufacturers of hot dogs and luncheon meats collectively recalled more than 500,000 pounds of product owing to possible Listeria contamination. This article, through focus on issues such as reexamination of zero-tolerance policies, improvements in detection and enumeration procedures, the impact of epidemiologic innovations, and measures needed to further reduce the incidence of listeriosis will highlight why L monocytogenes remains a continuing challenge for the food industry.
PubMed ID
11444596 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.