Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Challenges in listeriosis cluster and outbreak investigations, Province of Quebec, 1997-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106640
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Colette Gaulin
Geneviève Gravel
Sadjia Bekal
Andrea Currie
Danielle Ramsay
Sophie Roy
Author Affiliation
1 Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux , Québec, Québec, Canada .
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health authorities place a high priority on investigating listeriosis outbreaks, and these epidemiological investigations remain challenging. Some approaches have been described in the literature to address these challenges. This review of listeriosis clusters and outbreaks investigated in the Province of Quebec (Quebec) highlights investigative approaches that contributed to identifying the source of these outbreaks.
The Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec (LSPQ) implemented pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) molecular subtyping in 1997 to identify Listeria monocytogenes clusters among isolates from invasive listeriosis cases identified throughout Quebec. A cluster was defined as three cases or more with the same or similar PFGE profiles (=3 band difference) occurring over a 4-month period. An investigation was initiated if the epidemiologic indicators suggested a common source. Listeriosis data from LSPQ's database were reviewed to identify and describe clusters detected from 1997 to 2011, including those that led to an outbreak investigation. Epidemiological reports prepared following each outbreak were also reviewed.
Eleven clusters were identified in the province by LSPQ between 1997 and 2011. Outbreak investigations were initiated for six clusters, four of which involved more than 10 cases. Factors that contributed to identifying the source for three of these outbreaks highlighted the value of (1) making all stakeholders (food safety and inspection services, public health authorities, and laboratories) aware of any ongoing investigation and sharing relevant information even if the source is not yet identified; (2) promptly collecting food samples identified and considered as possible vehicles of infection identified during the interview of a Listeria case; (3) collecting food items and/or environmental samples in locations reported in common by cases in the same cluster.
Multiple approaches should be considered when investigating L. monocytogenes clusters. Networks to facilitate continuous exchange of human and food data between public health and food safety partners should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
24134667 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterisation of Danish isolates of Listeria monocytogenes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224603
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Nørrung
Author Affiliation
Institute of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Animals
Bacteriophage Typing
Cluster analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrophoresis, Starch Gel
Enzymes - analysis - genetics
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - enzymology - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Meat - microbiology
Milk - microbiology
Serotyping
Sewage
Abstract
A total of 84 strains of Listeria monocytogenes were analysed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis at twelve enzyme loci. Eight enzyme loci were polymorphic with between 2 and 4 alleles per locus. Fourteen electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified. Among 62 human clinical isolates from Denmark, 8 different ETs were defined. Two ETs, designated ET 1 and ET 6, accounted for 77% of the human clinical isolates investigated. These ETs are identical with those responsible for several epidemics in Switzerland and in the United States. Comparison of 58 isolates of L. monocytogenes, typed by MEE, in relation to phage typing showed that phage typing was more discriminatory than MEE. The ability of MEE to distinguish between phage types of Epi-type and other phage types, however, was almost optimal. MEE typed 23 of 24 strains of Epi-type as belonging to ET 1. In contrast ET 1 was not found in 26 strains with phage types other than the Epi-type.
PubMed ID
1622759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of human invasive isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden 1986-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154770
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2008 Dec;5(6):755-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Vishal Singh Parihar
Gloria Lopez-Valladares
Marie-Louise Danielsson-Tham
Inoka Peiris
Seved Helmersson
Magnus Unemo
Birgitta Andersson
Malin Arneborn
Elizabeth Bannerman
Sukdevo Barbuddhe
Jacques Bille
Lajos Hajdu
Christine Jacquet
Christina Johansson
Margareta Löfdahl
Gunnel Möllerberg
HÃ¥kan Ringberg
Jocelyne Rocourt
Ingela Tjernberg
Jan Ursing
Birgitta Henriques-Normark
Wilhelm Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, Orebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2008 Dec;5(6):755-61
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - microbiology
Phylogeny
Retrospective Studies
Serotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Since 1986, 68% of the Listeria monocytogenes isolates from human cases of invasive listeriosis in Sweden are available for retrospective studies. The aim of the present study was to characterize 601 human invasive isolates of L. monocytogenes in Sweden from 1986 to 2007 by using serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Since 1996, serovar 4b was permanently reduced to the second or third most common serovar in human cases in Sweden. During the latter period, 2000-2007, only 13% belonged to serovar 4b and 71% to 1/2a. The dendrogram, based on pulsovars, reveals two clusters with different serovars. Cluster 1 exhibits serovars 4b and 1/2b, whereas cluster 2 consists of serovar 1/2a. Serovar 1/2a seems to be more heterogeneous than serovar 4b.
PubMed ID
18847381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sequence typing confirms that a predominant Listeria monocytogenes clone caused human listeriosis cases and outbreaks in Canada from 1988 to 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126958
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 May;50(5):1748-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stephen J Knabel
Aleisha Reimer
Bindhu Verghese
Mei Lok
Jennifer Ziegler
Jeffrey Farber
Franco Pagotto
Morag Graham
Celine A Nadon
Matthew W Gilmour
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA. sjk9@psu.edu
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 May;50(5):1748-51
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Human listeriosis outbreaks in Canada have been predominantly caused by serotype 1/2a isolates with highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST) each identified a diverse population of Listeria monocytogenes isolates, and within that, both methods had congruent subtypes that substantiated a predominant clone (clonal complex 8; virulence type 59; proposed epidemic clone 5 [ECV]) that has been causing human illness across Canada for more than 2 decades.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2001 May-Jun;7(3):382-911384513
Cites: J Food Prot. 2002 Nov;65(11):1811-2912430709
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2004 Feb;70(2):913-2014766571
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Mar 17;95(6):3140-59501229
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006 Spring;3(1):132-716602988
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Apr;138(4):559-7219818199
Cites: PLoS Pathog. 2008;4(9):e100014618773117
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2010;11:12020167121
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2011 May;77(10):3279-9221441318
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Jun;17(6):1110-221749783
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Mar;45(3):835-4617215339
PubMed ID
22337989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Subtyping of a large collection of historical Listeria monocytogenes strains from Ontario, Canada, by an improved multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107964
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Oct;79(20):6472-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
S. Saleh-Lakha
V G Allen
J. Li
F. Pagotto
J. Odumeru
E. Taboada
M. Lombos
K C Tabing
B. Blais
D. Ogunremi
G. Downing
S. Lee
A. Gao
C. Nadon
S. Chen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory Services Division, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Oct;79(20):6472-80
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Minisatellite Repeats
Molecular Typing - methods
Ontario
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for severe and often fatal food-borne infections in humans. A collection of 2,421 L. monocytogenes isolates originating from Ontario's food chain between 1993 and 2010, along with Ontario clinical isolates collected from 2004 to 2010, was characterized using an improved multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). The MLVA method was established based on eight primer pairs targeting seven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci in two 4-plex fluorescent PCRs. Diversity indices and amplification rates of the individual VNTR loci ranged from 0.38 to 0.92 and from 0.64 to 0.99, respectively. MLVA types and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were compared using Comparative Partitions analysis involving 336 clinical and 99 food and environmental isolates. The analysis yielded Simpson's diversity index values of 0.998 and 0.992 for MLVA and PFGE, respectively, and adjusted Wallace coefficients of 0.318 when MLVA was used as a primary subtyping method and 0.088 when PFGE was a primary typing method. Statistical data analysis using BioNumerics allowed for identification of at least 8 predominant and persistent L. monocytogenes MLVA types in Ontario's food chain. The MLVA method correctly clustered epidemiologically related outbreak strains and separated unrelated strains in a subset analysis. An MLVA database was established for the 2,421 L. monocytogenes isolates, which allows for comparison of data among historical and new isolates of different sources. The subtyping method coupled with the MLVA database will help in effective monitoring/prevention approaches to identify environmental contamination by pathogenic strains of L. monocytogenes and investigation of outbreaks.
Notes
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Jun 10;124(3):239-4918457891
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1999 Aug 1;49(1-2):95-10210477075
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Jan;69(1):93-10516416906
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006 Spring;3(1):132-716602988
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006 Spring;3(1):138-4116602989
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Mar;45(3):835-4617215339
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2007 Apr 10;115(2):187-9417174430
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2008 Feb;72(2):141-818096258
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Rev. 2009 Sep;33(5):892-91619453749
Cites: Infect Genet Evol. 2009 Jul;9(4):430-4019460308
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Apr;46(4):1435-5018256218
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Apr;138(4):559-7219818199
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2010;11:12020167121
Cites: Int J Med Microbiol. 2011 Feb;301(2):79-9620708964
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2011 Jul 15;148(1):8-1421550679
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011 Oct 7;60(39):1357-821976119
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Nov;49(11):3997-400021918028
Cites: Int J Med Microbiol. 2011 Dec;301(8):648-5321975141
Cites: Microbiology. 2001 May;147(Pt 5):1095-10411320113
Cites: J AOAC Int. 2002 Mar-Apr;85(2):524-3111990041
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1469-7912682132
Cites: Syst Appl Microbiol. 2003 Jun;26(2):236-4412866850
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Sep;41(9):4388-9412958274
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Jan;42(1):276-8514715765
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2004 Feb;70(2):913-2014766571
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2004 Aug;58(2):213-2215234519
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2004 Aug;70(8):4458-6715294773
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Aug;42(8):3819-2215297538
Cites: J Food Prot. 2004 Aug;67(8):1656-6515330530
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Nov;26(11):2465-63069867
Cites: Microbiol Rev. 1991 Sep;55(3):476-5111943998
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-6010364616
Cites: J Bacteriol. 2005 Aug;187(16):5537-5116077098
PubMed ID
23956391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Surveillance for Listeria monocytogenes and listeriosis, 1995-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148062
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Apr;138(4):559-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
C G Clark
J. Farber
F. Pagotto
N. Ciampa
K. Doré
C. Nadon
K. Bernard
L-K Ng
Author Affiliation
Bacteriology and Enteric Disease Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada. clifford_clark@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2010 Apr;138(4):559-72
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Blood - microbiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
Canadian cases and outbreaks of illness caused by Listeria monocytogenes between 1995 and 2004 were assessed. Isolates (722 total) were characterized by serotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to provide a means of detecting case clusters. Rates of listeriosis remained fairly consistent during the period of study, and patient characteristics were similar to those seen in studies of other populations. Most isolates were obtained from blood and cerebrospinal fluid, although during some outbreak investigations isolates were also obtained from stools. Serotype 1/2a predominated in isolates from patients in Canada, followed by serotypes 4b and 1/2b. Outbreaks caused by L. monocytogenes that occurred during the period of study were caused by isolates with serotypes 1/2a and 4b. A retrospective analysis of PFGE data uncovered several clusters that might have represented undetected outbreaks, suggesting that comprehensive prospective PFGE analysis coupled with prompt epidemiological investigations might lead to improved outbreak detection and control.
PubMed ID
19818199 View in PubMed
Less detail

Surveillance of listeriosis in Finland during 1995-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168646
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(6):82-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
U M Nakari
S. Lukinmaa
E. Kela
N. Nguyen Tran Minh
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(6):82-5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fish Products - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Serotyping
Abstract
We analysed the surveillance data from listeriosis cases notified to the Finnish National Infectious Diseases Register between 1995 and 2004 and describe our recent experience in investigating clusters of listeriosis cases. The number of annual cases varied between 18 and 53 but no trends in incidence were identified (average annual incidence was 7 cases per million inhabitants). Only a few cases affected pregnant women or newborns. Most of the patients were elderly people with non-malignant underlying illnesses; 25% of them died from their infections. By routine sero- and genotyping of the listeria isolates, we detected several clusters; the vehicle for infection was only identified for two outbreaks. At least one quarter of listeriosis cases (78/315) was caused by a certain sero-genotype or closely related genotypes, which have also been found from vacuum-packed cold-smoked or cold-salted fish products. During 2000-2003, Finnish consumers were repeatedly informed about food precautions for risk groups. The information was also given to attending physicians and prenatal clinics.
PubMed ID
16801696 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.