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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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Fate of Listeria monocytogenes on fully ripened Greek Graviera cheese stored at 4, 12, or 25 degrees C in air or vacuum packages: in situ PCR detection of a cocktail of bacteriocins potentially contributing to pathogen inhibition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151703
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Eleni Giannou
Athanasia Kakouri
Bojana Bogovic Matijasic
Irena Rogelj
John Samelis
Author Affiliation
National Agricultural Research Foundation, Dairy Research Institute, Katsikas, 45221 Ioannina, Greece.
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):531-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteriocins - isolation & purification
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Enterococcus faecium - metabolism
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Oxygen - metabolism
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Risk assessment
Temperature
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The behavior of Listeria monocytogenes on fully ripened Greek Graviera cheese was evaluated. Three batches (A, B, and C) were tested. Batches A and C were prepared with a commercial starter culture, while in batch B the starter culture was combined with an enterocin-producing Enterococcus faecium Graviera isolate. Cheese pieces were surface inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes at ca. 3 log CFU/cm2, packed under air or vacuum conditions, stored at 4, 12, or 25 degrees C, and analyzed after 0, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. L. monocytogenes did not grow on the cheese surface, regardless of storage conditions. However, long-term survival of the pathogen was noted in all treatments, being the highest (P
PubMed ID
19343941 View in PubMed
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Febrile gastroenteritis after eating on-farm manufactured fresh cheese--an outbreak of listeriosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13906
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
J J Carrique-Mas
I. Hökeberg
Y. Andersson
M. Arneborn
W. Tham
M L Danielsson-Tham
B. Osterman
M. Leffler
M. Steen
E. Eriksson
G. Hedin
J. Giesecke
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE-17182 Solna, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Feb;130(1):79-86
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cheese - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis affected consumers of on-farm manufactured dairy products from a summer farm in Sweden. Symptoms included diarrhoea, fever, stomach cramps and vomiting in 88, 60, 54 and 21% of cases identified. The median incubation period was 31 h. A cohort study with 33 consumers showed an attack rate of 52% and an association between the total amount of product eaten and illness (P=0.07). Twenty-seven of 32 (84%) stool samples cultured for Listeria monocytogenes tested positive, although there was no association between clinical disease and the isolation of L. monocytogenes. In addition, gene sequences for VTEC and ETEC were detected in 6 and 1 subjects, respectively. Bacteriological analysis of cheese samples revealed heavy contamination with L. monocytogenes and coagulase positive staphylococci in all of them and gene markers for VTEC in one of them. Molecular profiles for L. monocytogenes isolated from dairy products, stool samples and an abscess from 1 patient who developed septic arthritis were identical. Results of both microbiological and epidemiological analyses point to L. monocytogenes as the most likely cause of this outbreak. The finding of markers for VTEC in some humans and cheese samples means that a mixed aetiology at least in some cases cannot be conclusively ruled out.
PubMed ID
12613748 View in PubMed
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Microbial background flora in small-scale cheese production facilities does not inhibit growth and surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261690
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2013 Oct;96(10):6161-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
B C T Schirmer
E. Heir
T. Møretrø
I. Skaar
S. Langsrud
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2013 Oct;96(10):6161-71
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibiosis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Bacterial Adhesion
Cheese - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Food Safety
Lactococcus lactis - isolation & purification - physiology
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - physiology
Microbiota - physiology
Norway
Salts
Yeasts - isolation & purification - physiology
Abstract
The background microbiota of 5 Norwegian small-scale cheese production sites was examined and the effect of the isolated strains on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. Samples were taken from the air, food contact surfaces (storage surfaces, cheese molds, and brine) and noncontact surfaces (floor, drains, and doors) and all isolates were identified by sequencing and morphology (mold). A total of 1,314 isolates were identified and found to belong to 55 bacterial genera, 1 species of yeast, and 6 species of mold. Lactococcus spp. (all of which were Lactococcus lactis), Staphylococcus spp., Microbacterium spp., and Psychrobacter sp. were isolated from all 5 sites and Rhodococcus spp. and Chryseobacterium spp. from 4 sites. Thirty-two genera were only found in 1 out of 5 facilities each. Great variations were observed in the microbial background flora both between the 5 producers, and also within the various production sites. The greatest diversity of bacteria was found in drains and on rubber seals of doors. The flora on cheese storage shelves and in salt brines was less varied. A total of 62 bacterial isolates and 1 yeast isolate were tested for antilisterial activity in an overlay assay and a spot-on-lawn assay, but none showed significant inhibitory effects. Listeria monocytogenes was also co-cultured on ceramic tiles with bacteria dominating in the cheese production plants: Lactococcus lactis, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus equorum, Rhodococcus spp., or Psychrobacter spp. None of the tested isolates altered the survival of L. monocytogenes on ceramic tiles. The conclusion of the study was that no common background flora exists in cheese production environments. None of the tested isolates inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes. Hence, this study does not support the hypothesis that the natural background flora in cheese production environments inhibits the growth or survival of L. monocytogenes.
PubMed ID
23891302 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods in Sweden 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119081
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2012 Nov 1;160(1):24-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2012
Author
S Thisted Lambertz
C. Nilsson
A. Brådenmark
S. Sylvén
A. Johansson
Lisa-Marie Jansson
M. Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Science Department, National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2012 Nov 1;160(1):24-31
Date
Nov-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Fish Products - microbiology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - isolation & purification
Meat Products - microbiology
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An increasing trend in human listeriosis cases over the past five years (2005-2009) in Sweden encouraged the authorities to examine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods in 2010. The combined results of two surveys are presented: the Swedish part of an EU-wide survey and a national survey. A total of 1590 samples covering three categories of RTE food able to support growth of L. monocytogenes: (i) soft and semi-soft cheeses (mould- and smear-ripened); (ii) heat-treated meat products; and (iii) smoked and gravad fish, were collected at retail outlets and analysed at the end of shelf life. L. monocytogenes was detected in 0.4% of 525 cheese samples, 1.2% of 507 meat-product samples and 12% of 558 fish samples. In the latter category, L. monocytogenes was found in 14% of both gravad and cold-smoked fish samples and in approximately 2% of hot-smoked fish samples. The percentage of cold-smoked or gravad fish testing positive for L. monocytogenes was significantly lower in samples processed in Sweden (8%) than in samples processed in other countries (45%). Levels of L. monocytogenes exceeding 100 cfu/g were found in one (0.2%) of the cheese samples and in three (0.5%) of the fish samples. The high prevalence of contaminated cold-smoked and gravad fish samples suggests that these products constitute the main problem. This has induced the development of a national strategy plan with the aim to halve the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in cold-smoked and gravad fish at retail in Sweden by the end of year 2015.
PubMed ID
23141642 View in PubMed
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Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes in Norwegian raw milk cheese production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136658
Source
Food Microbiol. 2011 May;28(3):492-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ragnhild Aakre Jakobsen
Ragna Heggebø
Elin Bekvik Sunde
Magne Skjervheim
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute Bergen, P.O. Box 1263 Sentrum, N-5811 Bergen, Norway. ragnhild.jakobsen@vetinst.no
Source
Food Microbiol. 2011 May;28(3):492-6
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Fermentation
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Goats
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - isolation & purification
Milk - microbiology
Norway
Prevalence
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development - isolation & purification
Abstract
The aim of this study was to survey the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes during the cheese making process in small-scale raw milk cheese production in Norway. The prevalence of S. aureus in bovine and caprine raw milk samples was 47.3% and 98.8%, respectively. An increase in contamination during the first 2-3 h resulted in a 73.6% prevalence of contamination in the bovine curd, and 23 out of 38 S. aureus-negative bovine milk samples gave rise to S. aureus-positive curds. The highest contamination levels of S. aureus were reached in both caprine and bovine cheese after 5-6 h (after the first pressing). There was no contamination of L. monocytogenes in caprine cheeses and only one (1.4%) contaminated bovine cheese. This work has increased our knowledge about S. aureus and L. monocytogenes contamination during the process of raw milk cheese production and gives an account of the hygiene status during the manufacture of Norwegian raw milk cheeses.
PubMed ID
21356456 View in PubMed
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Widespread listeriosis outbreak attributable to pasteurized cheese, which led to extensive cross-contamination affecting cheese retailers, Quebec, Canada, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128206
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Jan;75(1):71-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Colette Gaulin
Danielle Ramsay
Sadjia Bekal
Author Affiliation
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, 1075 chemin Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada G1S 2M1. Colette.gaulin@msss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Jan;75(1):71-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
A major Listeria monocytogenes outbreak occurred in the province of Quebec, Canada, in 2008, involving a strain of L. monocytogenes (LM P93) characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and associated with the consumption of pasteurized milk cheese. This report describes the results of the ensuing investigation. All individuals affected with LM P93 across the province were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Microbiological and environmental investigations were conducted by the Quebec's Food Inspection Branch of Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec among retailers and cheese plants involved in the outbreak. Between 8 June and 31 December 2008, 38 confirmed cases of LM P93 were reported to public health authorities, including 16 maternal-neonatal cases (14 pregnant women, and two babies born to asymptomatic mothers). The traceback of many brands of cheese that tested positive for LM P93 collected from retailers identified two cheese plants contaminated by L. monocytogenes strains on 3 and 4 September. PFGE profiles became available for both plants on 8 September, and confirmed that a single plant was associated with the outbreak. Products from these two plants were distributed to more than 300 retailers in the province, leading to extensive cross-contamination of retail stock. L. monocytogenes is ubiquitous, and contamination can occur subsequent to heat treatment, which usually precedes cheese production. Contaminated soft-textured cheese is particularly prone to bacterial growth. Ongoing regulatory and industry efforts are needed to decrease the presence of Listeria in foods, including pasteurized products. Retailers should be instructed about the risk of cross-contamination, even with soft pasteurized cheese and apply methods to avoid it.
PubMed ID
22221357 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.