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Canadian listeriosis reference service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169874
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006;3(1):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Franco Pagotto
Lai-King Ng
Clifford Clark
Jeff Farber
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Products and Food Branch, Ontario, Canada. Franco_Pagotto@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006;3(1):132-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Databases, Factual
Disease Notification
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Public Health
Virulence
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes, a psychrotrophic organism capable of growing at refrigeration temperatures, is of major concern in extended shelf life, refrigerated foods. Considering that as much as 80-90% of human listeriosis cases are linked to the ingestion of contaminated food, human cases are predominantly seen in high-risk individuals, including organ-transplant recipients, patients with AIDS and HIV-infected individuals, pregnant women, cancer patients, and the elderly. In 2001, the Canadian Listeriosis Reference Service (LRS) was created by the Bureau of Microbial Hazards (Health Canada) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (now part of the Public Health Agency of Canada). Major goals of the LRS include investigation of listeriosis cases and maintenance of a national collection of isolates. The LRS intends to create a comprehensive molecular epidemiological database of all isolates in Canada for use as a resource for outbreak investigations, research and other microbiological investigations. The PFGE profiles are being established and stored for clinical, food, environmental, and possibly animal strains of L. monocytogenes. The LRS pursues research activities for investigation and implementation of other molecular methods for characterizing L. monocytogenes isolates. Ribotyping, Multi-locus Sequence Typing (MLST), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR), Multi-locus virulence sequence typing (MLVA), microarray- based technologies and sequence-based typing schemes, are being investigated on selected diversity sets. The LRS has also used PFGE typing for outbreak investigations. The molecular epidemiological data, timely coordination and exchange of information should help to reduce the incidence of listeriosis in Canada. In Canada, listeriosis is not a national notifiable disease, except for the province of Quebec, where it has been since 1999. The LRS, Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network, and federal epidemiologists are currently working on making human listeriosis notifiable throughout Canada.
PubMed ID
16602988 View in PubMed
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Cold growth behaviour and genetic comparison of Canadian and Swiss Listeria monocytogenes strains associated with the food supply chain and human listeriosis cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256814
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Carolina Arguedas-Villa
Jovana Kovacevic
Kevin J Allen
Roger Stephan
Taurai Tasara
Author Affiliation
Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Canada
Food chain
Food Microbiology
Food Supply
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Phylogeny
Switzerland
Temperature
Abstract
Sixty-two strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Canada and Switzerland were investigated. Comparison based on molecular genotypes confirmed that strains in these two countries are genetically diverse. Interestingly strains from both countries displayed similar range of cold growth phenotypic profiles. Based on cold growth lag phase duration periods displayed in BHI at 4??C, the strains were similarly divided into groups of fast, intermediate and slow cold adaptors. Overall Swiss strains had faster exponential cold growth rates compared to Canadian strains. However gene expression analysis revealed no significant differences between fast and slow cold adapting strains in the ability to induce nine cold adaptation genes (lmo0501, cspA, cspD, gbuA, lmo0688, pgpH, sigB, sigH and sigL) in response to cold stress exposure. Neither was the presence of Stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1) analysed by PCR associated with enhanced cold adaptation. Phylogeny based on the sigL gene subdivided strains from these two countries into two major and one minor cluster. Fast cold adaptors were more frequently in one of the major clusters (cluster A), whereas slow cold adaptors were mainly in the other (cluster B). Genetic differences between these two major clusters are associated with various amino acid substitutions in the predicted SigL proteins. Compared to the EGDe type strain and most slow cold adaptors, most fast cold adaptors exhibited five identical amino acid substitutions (M90L, S203A/S203T, S304N, S315N, and I383T) in their SigL proteins. We hypothesize that these amino acid changes might be associated with SigL protein structural and functional changes that may promote differences in cold growth behaviour between L.?monocytogenes strains.
PubMed ID
24549201 View in PubMed
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Coliforms and prevalence of Escherichia coli and foodborne pathogens on minimally processed spinach in two packing plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152389
Source
J Food Prot. 2008 Dec;71(12):2398-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sanja Ilic
Joseph Odomeru
Jeffrey T LeJeune
Author Affiliation
Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio 44691, USA.
Source
J Food Prot. 2008 Dec;71(12):2398-403
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli O157 - isolation & purification
Food contamination - analysis
Food Handling - methods
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Shigella - isolation & purification
Spinacia oleracea - microbiology
United States
Abstract
Minimally processed spinach has been recently associated with outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. This study investigated the effect of commercial minimal processing of spinach on the coliform and Escherichia coli counts and the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on two types of spinach before and after minimal processing. A total of 1,356 spinach samples (baby spinach, n = 574; savoy spinach, n = 782) were collected daily in two processing plants over a period of 14 months. Raw spinach originated from nine farms in the United States and three farms in Canada. Overall, the proportion of samples positive for coliforms increased from 53% before minimal processing to 79% after minimal processing (P 0.1) was observed. E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella spp. were not isolated from any of the samples. Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were isolated from 0.4 and 0.7% of samples, respectively. Results demonstrate that commercial minimal processing of spinach based on monitored chlorine washing and drying may not decrease microbial load on spinach leaves as expected. Further research is needed to identify the most appropriate measures to control food safety risk under commercial minimal processing of fresh vegetables.
PubMed ID
19244890 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241209
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J W Davies
E P Ewan
P. Varughese
S E Acres
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - congenital - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Since its first isolation by Murray in 1926 Listeria monocytogenes has become recognized as a significant pathogen occurring worldwide and involving a wide range of wild and domestic animals including man. The first confirmed human listeriosis case in Canada was published by Stoot in 1951. A later survey based on records maintained at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa showed 101 cases detected over a 21 year period in nine provinces. The overall mortality was 30%. The most frequently isolated serotype was 4b followed by 1 and 1b. Prior to the Nova Scotia epidemic (41 cases) of 1981, fewer than 15 cases per annum had been diagnosed based on hospital discharge records. The Nova Scotia epidemic was unique in that the source and mode of transmission of the organism were determined. Sixty-three strains isolated from this outbreak were typed, and with the exception of one 1a strain, were identified as 4b. These were subsequently classified mainly as phage type 00 042 0000 and 00 002 0000. Listeriosis appears to be a common infection in the animal population in Canada primarily in cattle, sheep, chinchillas, chickens and goats. Outbreaks have been described in rabbits, goats, and chinchillas. Chinchilla farms were affected in one outbreak (serotype 1) in Nova Scotia which was attributed to feeding a new batch of meal containing beet pulp. Many aspects of the epidemiology of listeriosis are obscure. A cycle involving contaminated soil and consumption of raw vegetables has been confirmed as the cause of the Nova Scotia epidemic and could explain a proportion of the sporadic cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6442654 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254504
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1973
Author
E J Bowmer
J A McKiel
W H Cockcroft
N. Schmitt
D E Rappay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim
Date
Jul-21-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antigens, Bacterial
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes
Listeriosis - blood - cerebrospinal fluid - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - mortality
Male
Meningitis - etiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Rabbits - immunology
Sepsis - etiology
Skin Manifestations
Abstract
Between 1951 and January 1972 listeriosis was diagnosed bacteriologically in 101 Canadian patients. This study adds 80 cases to the 21 reported from Metropolitan Toronto by Sepp and Roy in 1963. The Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, collated epidemiological and clinical data. Serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes included 4b (53), 1 (15), 1b (6), 1a (2), 2 and 3. Clinically, 54 patients had meningitis and 23 septicemia. The mortality rate was 30%.Between 1954 and January 1972 listeriosis affected 15 British Columbian patients: nine were male and six female; 12 were less than 1 or more than 45 years old. Among the patients were a pregnant mother and the son to whom she gave premature birth. A day-old infant and an elderly man died.
Notes
Cites: Bacteriol Rev. 1966 Jun;30(2):309-824956900
Cites: Am J Med. 1968 Dec;45(6):904-214972645
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Sep 9;285(11):598-6034998254
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Sep 14;99(10):494-55006478
Cites: Am J Med Sci. 1951 Mar;221(3):343-5214810715
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Mar 16;88:549-6113987999
Cites: Can J Med Technol. 1954 Dec;16(4):142-613230961
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1955 Sep 1;73(5):402-513250472
Cites: Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1958 Feb 7;83(6):211-413512052
Cites: Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1962 Dec 28;87:2682-413963030
Cites: AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954 Apr;93(4):515-2713137627
PubMed ID
4198595 View in PubMed
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Listeriosis at Vancouver General Hospital, 1965-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243994
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1981
Author
A G Skidmore
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Date
Dec-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Alcoholism - complications
Canada
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sepsis - microbiology
Abstract
The records were reviewed of all patients treated at the Vancouver General Hospital over the 15 years from 1965 through 1979 for infections proved by culture to have been caused by Listeria monocytogenes. Although listeriosis is not common in humans, certain groups seem to be susceptible - immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, neonates and the elderly. All these groups were represented among the 22 cases reviewed. There were 17 adults, 3 of whom were pregnant women who had only a mild influenza-like illness. Of the remaining 14 adults 9 were immunocompromised and 5 apparently immunocompetent; 7 presented with meningitis and 7 with bacteremia only. Of the five infants with neonatal listeriosis, two had early-onset disease (bacteremia) and three had the late-onset form (meningitis). Seven patients were treated with penicillin alone, seven with ampicillin alone and eight with penicillin or ampicillin combined with kanamycin, gentamicin or chloramphenicol. There were eight deaths: several were directly attributable to the listeriosis, but in others the severity of the underlying illness was an important factor. Serotypes 1 and 4b were equally common among the 16 specimens of L. monocytogenes that were typed.
Notes
Cites: Bacteriol Rev. 1966 Jun;30(2):309-824956900
Cites: Appl Microbiol. 1971 Mar;21(3):516-94994904
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1973 May;127(5):610-14698647
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim4198595
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1972 Jan;1(1):30-44207757
Cites: J Pediatr. 1976 Mar;88(3):481-3812974
Cites: Mt Sinai J Med. 1977 Jan-Feb;44(1):42-59403404
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Br Emp. 1963 Jun;70:481-213972833
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1964 Aug 1;89:915-2314207559
PubMed ID
6800624 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.