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Microbiological baseline study of swine carcasses at Swedish slaughterhouses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161544
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Aug;70(8):1790-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
M. Lindblad
H. Lindmark
S Thisted Lambertz
R. Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, P.O. Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden. mats.lindblad@slv.se
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Aug;70(8):1790-7
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Bacteria, Aerobic
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - isolation & purification
Abstract
This 13-month survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence and counts of foodborne pathogenic bacteria and indicator bacteria on swine carcasses in Sweden. A total of 541 swine carcasses were sampled by swabbing prechill at the 10 largest slaughterhouses in Sweden. Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica was detected by PCR in 16% of the samples. The probability of finding Y. enterocolitica increased with increasing counts of Escherichia coli. No samples were positive for Salmonella. The prevalences of Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, and verocytotoxin-producing E. coli were low (1, 2, and 1%, respectively). None of the verocytotoxin-positive enrichments, as determined by a reverse passive latex agglutination assay, tested positive for the virulence genes eaeA or hlyA by PCR. Coagulase-positive staphylococci, E. coli, and Enterobacteriaceae were recovered from 30, 57, and 87% of the samples, respectively, usually at low levels (95th percentiles, 0.79, 1.09, and 1.30 log CFU/cm2, respectively). The mean log level of Enterobacteriaceae was 0.35 log CFU/cm2 higher than that of E. coli on carcasses positive for both bacteria. The mean log level of aerobic microorganisms was 3.48 log CFU/cm2, and the 95th percentile was 4.51 log CFU/cm2. These data may be useful for risk assessment purposes and can serve as a basis for risk management actions, such as the use of E. coli as an alternative indicator organism for process hygiene control.
PubMed ID
17803133 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods in Sweden 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119081
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2012 Nov 1;160(1):24-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2012
Author
S Thisted Lambertz
C. Nilsson
A. Brådenmark
S. Sylvén
A. Johansson
Lisa-Marie Jansson
M. Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Science Department, National Food Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2012 Nov 1;160(1):24-31
Date
Nov-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Fish Products - microbiology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - isolation & purification
Meat Products - microbiology
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An increasing trend in human listeriosis cases over the past five years (2005-2009) in Sweden encouraged the authorities to examine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods in 2010. The combined results of two surveys are presented: the Swedish part of an EU-wide survey and a national survey. A total of 1590 samples covering three categories of RTE food able to support growth of L. monocytogenes: (i) soft and semi-soft cheeses (mould- and smear-ripened); (ii) heat-treated meat products; and (iii) smoked and gravad fish, were collected at retail outlets and analysed at the end of shelf life. L. monocytogenes was detected in 0.4% of 525 cheese samples, 1.2% of 507 meat-product samples and 12% of 558 fish samples. In the latter category, L. monocytogenes was found in 14% of both gravad and cold-smoked fish samples and in approximately 2% of hot-smoked fish samples. The percentage of cold-smoked or gravad fish testing positive for L. monocytogenes was significantly lower in samples processed in Sweden (8%) than in samples processed in other countries (45%). Levels of L. monocytogenes exceeding 100 cfu/g were found in one (0.2%) of the cheese samples and in three (0.5%) of the fish samples. The high prevalence of contaminated cold-smoked and gravad fish samples suggests that these products constitute the main problem. This has induced the development of a national strategy plan with the aim to halve the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in cold-smoked and gravad fish at retail in Sweden by the end of year 2015.
PubMed ID
23141642 View in PubMed
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