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Cold growth behaviour and genetic comparison of Canadian and Swiss Listeria monocytogenes strains associated with the food supply chain and human listeriosis cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256814
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Carolina Arguedas-Villa
Jovana Kovacevic
Kevin J Allen
Roger Stephan
Taurai Tasara
Author Affiliation
Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2014 Jun;40:81-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Canada
Food chain
Food Microbiology
Food Supply
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - microbiology
Phylogeny
Switzerland
Temperature
Abstract
Sixty-two strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Canada and Switzerland were investigated. Comparison based on molecular genotypes confirmed that strains in these two countries are genetically diverse. Interestingly strains from both countries displayed similar range of cold growth phenotypic profiles. Based on cold growth lag phase duration periods displayed in BHI at 4??C, the strains were similarly divided into groups of fast, intermediate and slow cold adaptors. Overall Swiss strains had faster exponential cold growth rates compared to Canadian strains. However gene expression analysis revealed no significant differences between fast and slow cold adapting strains in the ability to induce nine cold adaptation genes (lmo0501, cspA, cspD, gbuA, lmo0688, pgpH, sigB, sigH and sigL) in response to cold stress exposure. Neither was the presence of Stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1) analysed by PCR associated with enhanced cold adaptation. Phylogeny based on the sigL gene subdivided strains from these two countries into two major and one minor cluster. Fast cold adaptors were more frequently in one of the major clusters (cluster A), whereas slow cold adaptors were mainly in the other (cluster B). Genetic differences between these two major clusters are associated with various amino acid substitutions in the predicted SigL proteins. Compared to the EGDe type strain and most slow cold adaptors, most fast cold adaptors exhibited five identical amino acid substitutions (M90L, S203A/S203T, S304N, S315N, and I383T) in their SigL proteins. We hypothesize that these amino acid changes might be associated with SigL protein structural and functional changes that may promote differences in cold growth behaviour between L.?monocytogenes strains.
PubMed ID
24549201 View in PubMed
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Examination of food chain-derived Listeria monocytogenes strains of different serotypes reveals considerable diversity in inlA genotypes, mutability, and adaptation to cold temperatures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117278
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Mar;79(6):1915-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jovana Kovacevic
Carolina Arguedas-Villa
Anna Wozniak
Taurai Tasara
Kevin J Allen
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health Program, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Mar;79(6):1915-22
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
British Columbia
Caco-2 Cells
Cold Temperature
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Epithelial Cells - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - pathogenicity - physiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes strains belonging to serotypes 1/2a and 4b are frequently linked to listeriosis. While inlA mutations leading to premature stop codons (PMSCs) and attenuated virulence are common in 1/2a, they are rare in serotype 4b. We observed PMSCs in 35% of L. monocytogenes isolates (n = 54) recovered from the British Columbia food supply, including serotypes 1/2a (30%), 1/2c (100%), and 3a (100%), and a 3-codon deletion (amino acid positions 738 to 740) seen in 57% of 4b isolates from fish-processing facilities. Caco-2 invasion assays showed that two isolates with the deletion were significantly more invasive than EGD-SmR (P 200 h) adaptors. Intermediate CAG strains (70%) more frequently possessed inlA PMSCs than did fast (20%) and slow (10%) CAGs; in contrast, 87% of fast adaptors lacked inlA PMSCs. In conclusion, we report food chain-derived 1/2a and 4b serotypes with a 3-codon deletion possessing invasive behavior and the novel association of inlA genotypes encoding a full-length InlA with fast cold-adaptation phenotypes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23315746 View in PubMed
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Occurrence and distribution of listeria species in facilities producing ready-to-eat foods in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127483
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Feb;75(2):216-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Jovana Kovacevic
Lorraine F McIntyre
Sarah B Henderson
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health Program, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4. jovanak@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Feb;75(2):216-24
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Dairy Products - microbiology
Fast Foods - microbiology
Fish Products - microbiology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Humans
Listeria - isolation & purification
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat Products - microbiology
Prevalence
Abstract
In British Columbia (BC), Canada, food processing facilities licensed under provincial authority are not required to sample for Listeria monocytogenes in food products or processing environments. In 2009, we conducted a survey of dairy, fish, and meat facilities under BC authority to estimate the prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods and production environments. From August to October, 250 RTE food samples and 258 swabs from the food processing environments of 43 facilities were collected. Standard culture methods were applied to both food samples and swabs. Of swabs collected from all 258 environmental surfaces, 15% were positive for Listeria spp. Significantly (P, 0.001) more fish facilities than dairy and meat facilities had food contact surfaces contaminated with Listeria spp. L. monocytogenes was found in RTE foods from fish facilities alone (5 of 12); in all five of the fish facilities with contaminated product, one or more environmental swabs were also positive for L. monocytogenes. The results suggest that while control of L. monocytogenes in BC-inspected dairy and meat facilities is effective in limiting food contamination, there is a need for provincial inspectors to initiate improved monitoring and management of contamination by L. monocytogenes in RTE fish processing facilities.
PubMed ID
22289580 View in PubMed
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