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104 records – page 1 of 11.

Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1999 Nov;65(11):4793-810543788
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1999 Jan 8;47(51-52):1117-89921730
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Cites: J Bacteriol. 1999 Jan;181(2):418-259882654
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1969 May;98(2):486-934977480
PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a infections from butter in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198523
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
T. Autio
R. Maijala
P. Ruutu
T. Honkanen-Buzalski
M. Miettinen
M. Hatakka
J. Mikkola
V J Anttila
T. Johansson
L. Rantala
T. Aalto
H. Korkeala
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. outi.lyytikainen@ktl. fi.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2000 May;181(5):1838-41
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butter - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Dairying
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
In February 1999, an outbreak of listeriosis caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotype 3a occurred in Finland. All isolates were identical. The outbreak strain was first isolated in 1997 in dairy butter. This dairy began delivery to a tertiary care hospital (TCH) in June 1998. From June 1998 to April 1999, 25 case patients were identified (20 with sepsis, 4 with meningitis, and 1 with abscess; 6 patients died). Patients with the outbreak strain were more likely to have been admitted to the TCH than were patients with other strains of L. monocytogenes (60% vs. 8%; odds ratio, 17.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.8-136.8). Case patients admitted to the TCH had been hospitalized longer before cultures tested positive than had matched controls (median, 31 vs. 10 days; P=.008). An investigation found the outbreak strain in packaged butter served at the TCH and at the source dairy. Recall of the product ended the outbreak.
PubMed ID
10823797 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59040
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
A. Eklöw
M L Danielsson-Tham
S. Loncarevic
L O Mentzing
I. Persson
H. Unnerstad
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Obstetric labor, premature
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported.
PubMed ID
9350756 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in Denmark 1958-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176428
Source
APMIS. 2005 Jan;113(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Joanna M Hansen
Peter Gerner-Smidt
Brita Bruun
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hillerød Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. jmh07@dadlnet.dk
Source
APMIS. 2005 Jan;113(1):31-6
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Evolution
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects
Listeriosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In order to see whether the susceptibility of Danish Listeria monocytogenes strains has changed over the years we examined a collection of human isolates from the period 1958-2001. We, furthermore, wanted to compare L. monocytogenes susceptibility testing using a disc diffusion assay with MIC measurements performed by the E-test. 106 strains isolated predominantly from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluids were examined together with three reference strains. Susceptibility to the following antibiotics was tested by the E-test and by Oxoid discs using Iso-sensitest agar: penicillin G, ampicillin, meropenem, gentamicin, sulphamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The strains were in the main sensitive to all antibiotics examined using both methods, except for ciprofloxacin, where the strains were intermediate sensitive. However, for penicillin, ampicillin and sulphamethoxazole, while the disc diffusion assay found the strains to be sensitive, MIC measurements generally placed the strains one dilution above the breakpoint for sensitivity in the intermediate sensitive group. Based on the MIC measurements, the antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes has not changed in Denmark from 1958 to 2001, and the multiresistant strains found in human infections elsewhere have not been found in Denmark.
PubMed ID
15676012 View in PubMed
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Anti-listerial inhibitory lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial cold smoked salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80840
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Tomé Elisabetta
Teixeira Paula
Gibbs Paul A
Author Affiliation
Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, R. Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibiosis
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food contamination - analysis
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Lactobacillus - growth & development - physiology
Listeria - growth & development
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Salmon - microbiology
Seafood - microbiology
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The natural microflora of cold-smoked fish at the end of shelf-life are lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Some of these display a capacity to inhibit spoilage as well as several strains of pathogenic micro-organisms, e.g. Listeria monocytogenes which is isolated frequently from cold-smoked salmon (CSS). Eight batches of sliced vacuum-packed CSS from Norway, Scotland and Spain were collected at retail. Packs were stored at 5 degrees C and examined for chemical and microbiological characteristics, at purchase date and at expiration date. pH, water activity and salt content were similar to available data on lightly preserved fish products. There was a consistent pattern in the development of the microflora on CSS; the initial level of LAB was low on freshly produced CSS (10(2) cfu g(-1)); however, storage in vacuum packaging at refrigeration temperature was elective for LAB. At the end of the stated shelf-life these micro-organisms, represented mainly by Lactobacillus spp., attained ca.10(7) cfu g(-1) while Enterobacteriaceae counts were consistently lower (10(5) cfu g(-1)), which indicates the ability of LAB to grow and compete with few carbohydrates available and in the presence of moderate salt concentrations. L. monocytogenes was not found in any sample. Forty-one percent of LAB strains isolated exhibited inhibitory capacity against Listeria innocua, in a plate assay. A majority of the inhibitory effects were non-bacteriocinogenic, but nevertheless were very competitive cultures which may provide an additional hurdle for improved preservation by natural means.
PubMed ID
16943030 View in PubMed
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Applicability of biological time temperature integrators as quality and safety indicators for meat products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146076
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Mar 31;138(1-2):119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2010
Author
M. Ellouze
J-C Augustin
Author Affiliation
CRYOLOG SA Département R&D. 58, Nantes, France. mellouze@vet-alfort.fr
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Mar 31;138(1-2):119-29
Date
Mar-31-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology - standards
Oxygen - metabolism
Poultry Products - microbiology - standards
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate (eO), a biological time temperature integrator (TTI) as a quality and safety indicator for ground beef packed under modified atmosphere and spiced cooked chicken slices packed under modified atmosphere. Storage trials and challenge tests were thus performed on several batches of the studied food to monitor and model the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and the indigenous food flora. Then, two different prototypes of the TTI (eO) were set and manufactured according to the studied products shelf lives. The TTI evolution with time at static and dynamic temperatures was monitored and modeled. Finally, exposure assessment models were set and used under several realistic storage profiles to assess the distributions of the concentration of the indigenous food flora and the distributions of the increase in the pathogens populations obtained at the end of the product shelf life or at the end point of the TTI, taking into account the TTIs batch variability. Results showed that in case of poor storage conditions, TTI can reduce the consumer exposure to altered or hazardous foods.
PubMed ID
20074826 View in PubMed
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Application of molecular genetic methods in diagnostics and epidemiology of food-borne bacterial pathogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176690
Source
APMIS. 2004 Nov-Dec;112(11-12):908-29
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Nov-Dec;112(11-12):908-29
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Campylobacter jejuni - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Clostridium perfringens - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Databases, Genetic
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Enterobacteriaceae - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Finland - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Molecular Biology - methods
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Salmonella enterica - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Yersinia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Abstract
Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter and Yersinia species, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium perfringens are the bacterial pathogens constituting the greatest burden of food-borne disease in Finland. Several molecular genetic methods have been applied to diagnose, discriminate and survey these bacteria. PCR, PCR-RFLP and PFGE are the most widely and successfully used. However, these methods are unable to replace conventional and internationally standardised phenotyping. Electronic database libraries of the different genomic profiles will enable continuous surveillance of infections and detection of possible infection clusters at an early stage. Furthermore, whole-genome sequence data have opened up new insights into epidemiological surveillance. Laboratory-based surveillance performed in a timely manner and exploiting adequate methods, and co-operation at local, national and international levels are among the key elements in preventing food-borne diseases. This paper reviews different applications of molecular genetic methods for investigating enteric bacterial pathogens and gives examples of the methods successfully used in diagnostics and epidemiological studies in Finland.
PubMed ID
15638843 View in PubMed
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Application of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis in studies of the epidemiology of Listeria monocytogenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220463
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B. Nørrung
N. Skovgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1993 Sep;59(9):2817-22
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrophoresis, Starch Gel
Enzymes - genetics - isolation & purification
Fishes
Food Microbiology
Genetic Variation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - enzymology - genetics
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Sheep
Abstract
A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. These strains were isolated from human and animal cases of listeriosis as well as from different kinds of raw and processed foods. Thirty-three electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified among the 245 strains. The strains investigated included all human clinical strains isolated in Denmark during 1989 and 1990. Seventy-three percent of the strains isolated in this period were assigned to one of only two ETs (ET 1 and ET 4). ET 1, which was found to be the most frequently occurring ET among strains isolated from human clinical cases, was also found to occur rather frequently in animal clinical cases. ET 1 was, however, found only sporadically among strains isolated from foods and food factories. The data indicate that there might be something distinctive about the physiology or ecology of the ET 1 clone which makes it more likely to bring about disease in human beings either because of high pathogenicity or because of a special ability to multiply to infectious doses in processed foods. Another type, designated ET 4, was found to be the next most frequently occurring ET, after ET 1, among human clinical isolates. This could be explained by the fact that ET 4 was found to be the most frequently occurring ET within food isolates.
Notes
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 27;308(4):203-66401354
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1986 May;51(5):873-842425735
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1987 Jul;63(1):1-113115937
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1989 May;86(10):3818-222498876
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1992 Jan-Feb;15(1-2):51-91622759
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1990 Jul;56(7):2133-412117880
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1988 May;6(3):229-423152796
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Cites: J Infect. 1990 May;20(3):251-92341735
PubMed ID
8215357 View in PubMed
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Bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281743
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-02-2016
Author
L-L Nousiainen
S. Joutsen
J. Lunden
M-L Hänninen
M. Fredriksson-Ahomaa
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Date
Sep-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Finland
Food Labeling
Food Microbiology
Food Quality
Food Safety
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology - prevention & control
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Oxygen
Plant Leaves - microbiology
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia - isolation & purification
Abstract
Consumption of packaged fresh leafy vegetables, which are convenient ready-to-eat products, has increased during the last decade. The number of foodborne outbreaks associated with these products has concurrently increased. In our study, (1) label information, (2) O2/CO2 composition, (3) bacterial quality and (4) safety of 100 fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level were studied in Finland during 2013. Bacterial quality was studied using aerobic bacteria (AB) and coliform bacteria (CB) counts, and searching for the presence of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Yersinia. The safety was studied by the presence of Salmonella, ail-positive Yersinia, stx-positive E. coli (STEC) and Listeria monocytogenes using PCR and culturing. Important label information was unavailable on several packages originating from different companies. The packaging date was missing on all packages and the date of durability on 83% of the packages. Storage temperature was declared on 62% of the packages and 73% of the packages contained information about prewashing. The batch/lot number was missing on 29% of the packages. Very low oxygen (O2) (
PubMed ID
27257744 View in PubMed
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Behavior of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Chouri├žo de Vinho, a dry fermented sausage made from wine-marinated meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114836
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J García Díez
L. Patarata
Author Affiliation
Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Centre of Studies in Animal and Veterinary Science, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Fermentation
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Abstract
Portuguese chouriço de vinho is made by drying coarsely minced meat and fat that has been previously marinated with wine (usually red), salt, and garlic for 1 to 2 days at a low temperature (4 to 8 °C). This procedure may improve the microbiological safety of the product. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of three pathogens in this product, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, to establish the minimum period of drying and maturation necessary to render safe products. The pathogens were inoculated in the chouriço de vinho batter. A factorial design was used to study the following variables in the fermentation process: (i) the presence or absence of an indigenous Lactobacillus sakei starter culture; (ii) the presence or absence of fermentable carbohydrates; and (iii) the salt level (1.5 or 3%). The samples were analyzed 24 h after the preparation of the batter (at stuffing); after 7, 15, and 30 days of drying; and after 30 days of storage at 4 °C under vacuum. Under all of the conditions studied, the levels of the three pathogens decreased during the drying period. In the early stages of drying, the addition of L. sakei starter culture and/or carbohydrates resulted in lower levels of gram-positive pathogens. After 15 days of drying, populations of all pathogens decreased by ca. 2 log in all samples. At that sampling time, L. monocytogenes was undetectable in the chouriço de vinho with L. sakei starter culture and carbohydrates. The mean count of S. aureus after 15 days of drying was below 1 log CFU/g. After 30 days of drying, no pathogens were detected. The drying period could be shortened to 15 days when considering only the gram-positive pathogens studied and the use of a starter culture and carbohydrates. Due to the low infective dose of Salmonella spp., the product should be considered safe after 30 days, when this pathogen became undetectable.
PubMed ID
23575119 View in PubMed
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104 records – page 1 of 11.