Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Immunisation against infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes in sheep.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57802
Source
Vet Rec. 1989 Jul 29;125(5):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-1989
Author
R. Gudding
L L Nesse
H. Grønstøl
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Rec. 1989 Jul 29;125(5):111-4
Date
Jul-29-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects
Lethal Dose 50
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Listeria monocytogenes - immunology
Mice
Norway
Questionnaires
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Silage
Vaccination - veterinary
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
Immunisation against listeriosis in sheep using a live, attenuated vaccine was introduced in Norway in 1984. Since then 65,000 to 80,000 animals have been vaccinated annually. Information obtained by a questionnaire showed that the incidence of listeriosis decreased from approximately 4.0 per cent before the introduction of the vaccine to 1.5 per cent after vaccination started. The incidence of abortions was 0.7 per cent in vaccinated flocks compared to 1.1 per cent in unvaccinated flocks. There were a few adverse reactions in the vaccinated sheep.
PubMed ID
2505430 View in PubMed
Less detail

Listeria monocytogenes infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241209
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J W Davies
E P Ewan
P. Varughese
S E Acres
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):315-20
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Listeriosis - congenital - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Abstract
Since its first isolation by Murray in 1926 Listeria monocytogenes has become recognized as a significant pathogen occurring worldwide and involving a wide range of wild and domestic animals including man. The first confirmed human listeriosis case in Canada was published by Stoot in 1951. A later survey based on records maintained at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa showed 101 cases detected over a 21 year period in nine provinces. The overall mortality was 30%. The most frequently isolated serotype was 4b followed by 1 and 1b. Prior to the Nova Scotia epidemic (41 cases) of 1981, fewer than 15 cases per annum had been diagnosed based on hospital discharge records. The Nova Scotia epidemic was unique in that the source and mode of transmission of the organism were determined. Sixty-three strains isolated from this outbreak were typed, and with the exception of one 1a strain, were identified as 4b. These were subsequently classified mainly as phage type 00 042 0000 and 00 002 0000. Listeriosis appears to be a common infection in the animal population in Canada primarily in cattle, sheep, chinchillas, chickens and goats. Outbreaks have been described in rabbits, goats, and chinchillas. Chinchilla farms were affected in one outbreak (serotype 1) in Nova Scotia which was attributed to feeding a new batch of meal containing beet pulp. Many aspects of the epidemiology of listeriosis are obscure. A cycle involving contaminated soil and consumption of raw vegetables has been confirmed as the cause of the Nova Scotia epidemic and could explain a proportion of the sporadic cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6442654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Listeriosis at Vancouver General Hospital, 1965-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243994
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1981
Author
A G Skidmore
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Dec 1;125(11):1217-21
Date
Dec-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Alcoholism - complications
Canada
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sepsis - microbiology
Abstract
The records were reviewed of all patients treated at the Vancouver General Hospital over the 15 years from 1965 through 1979 for infections proved by culture to have been caused by Listeria monocytogenes. Although listeriosis is not common in humans, certain groups seem to be susceptible - immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, neonates and the elderly. All these groups were represented among the 22 cases reviewed. There were 17 adults, 3 of whom were pregnant women who had only a mild influenza-like illness. Of the remaining 14 adults 9 were immunocompromised and 5 apparently immunocompetent; 7 presented with meningitis and 7 with bacteremia only. Of the five infants with neonatal listeriosis, two had early-onset disease (bacteremia) and three had the late-onset form (meningitis). Seven patients were treated with penicillin alone, seven with ampicillin alone and eight with penicillin or ampicillin combined with kanamycin, gentamicin or chloramphenicol. There were eight deaths: several were directly attributable to the listeriosis, but in others the severity of the underlying illness was an important factor. Serotypes 1 and 4b were equally common among the 16 specimens of L. monocytogenes that were typed.
Notes
Cites: Bacteriol Rev. 1966 Jun;30(2):309-824956900
Cites: Appl Microbiol. 1971 Mar;21(3):516-94994904
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand B Microbiol Immunol. 1972;Suppl 229:1-1574624477
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1973 May;127(5):610-14698647
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Jul 21;109(2):125-9 passim4198595
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1972 Jan;1(1):30-44207757
Cites: J Pediatr. 1976 Mar;88(3):481-3812974
Cites: Mt Sinai J Med. 1977 Jan-Feb;44(1):42-59403404
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Br Emp. 1963 Jun;70:481-213972833
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1964 Aug 1;89:915-2314207559
PubMed ID
6800624 View in PubMed
Less detail

Surveillance of Listeria monocytogenes in human and environmental specimens in Nova Scotia, 1974 to 1981.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241208
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):325-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J A Embil
E P Ewan
S W MacDonald
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1984;7(4):325-7
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cats
Dogs
Environmental Microbiology
Female
Fetal Blood - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification
Male
Nova Scotia
Placenta - microbiology
Pregnancy
Rectum - microbiology
Semen - microbiology
Urine - microbiology
Vagina - microbiology
Abstract
We examined specimens for L. monocytogenes using the "cold enrichment" technique of Gray et al. (J. Bacteriol., 55: 471, 1948) and a nalidixic agar plate (Ann. Inst. Pasteur 111: 90, 1966). Between 1974 and May 1981, we isolated L. monocytogenes from four of 5,255 specimens (rectal, vaginal and placental swabs; blood; spinal fluid; semen; necropsy material) which came from eight human populations (neonates, children, adult men, and pregnant and nonpregnant women) and from 161 animals. Three of the isolated strains were type 1, and they came from a newborn born at 32 weeks' gestation, that child's mother, and another woman who had recently delivered. The fourth (type 4b) came from a newborn twin born at 36 1/2 weeks' gestation. In June through October 1981, in 529 specimens, we isolated L. monocytogenes type 1/2 from two of four larvae tested (four earwigs and five slugs were all negative) and from three of 27 samples of fresh chicken liver (however, 18 samples of coleslaw were negative). At the same time, we isolated L. monocytogenes (not yet typed) from a rectal swab from one of 112 dogs examined. Rectal swabs from 107 cats were negative, as were vaginal swabs from 144 women and urine samples from 108 newborns.
PubMed ID
6442655 View in PubMed
Less detail