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Lineage II (Serovar 1/2a and 1/2c) Human Listeria monocytogenes Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Types Divided into PFGE Groups Using the Band Patterns Below 145.5?kb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286546
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Gloria Lopez-Valladares
Marie-Louise Danielsson-Tham
Richard V Goering
Wilhelm Tham
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2017 Jan;14(1):8-16
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Serogroup
Serotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Among 504 clinical lineage II isolates of Listeria monocytogenes isolated during 1958-2010 in Sweden, 119 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types (AscI) have been identified based on the number and distribution of all banding patterns in each DNA profile. In this study, these types were further divided into PFGE groups based on the configuration of small bands with sizes 145.5?kb.
PubMed ID
27860487 View in PubMed
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Listeria monocytogenes associated kerato-conjunctivitis in four horses in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276795
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Nov 09;57:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-09-2015
Author
Tobias Revold
Takele Abayneh
Hege Brun-Hansen
Signe L Kleppe
Ernst-Otto Ropstad
Robert A Hellings
Henning Sørum
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Nov 09;57:76
Date
Nov-09-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Female - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Horse Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Horses - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Keratoconjunctivitis, Infectious - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Listeria monocytogenes - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Listeriosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Male - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Norway - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - genetics - isolation & purification - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - veterinary
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes has been reported to cause various infectious diseases in both humans and animals. More rarely, ocular infections have been reported. To our knowledge, only two cases of Listeria keratitis have been described in horses. We report kerato-conjunctivitis in four Norwegian horses associated with L. monocytogenes. Clinically, all cases were presented with recurrent unilateral kerato-conjunctivitis. L. monocytogenes bacteria were isolated from swab samples from all cases, and cytology carried out in 3 cases was indicative of L. monocytogenes infection. The present report describes the first known cases in which L. monocytogenes has been isolated from keratitic lesions in horses in Norway. A potential risk factor may be feeding of silage or haylage, but other sources of infection cannot be ruled out. The phenotypic features including antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype of the isolates are described. Laboratory detection of L. monocytogenes demands extra caution since only low numbers of bacteria were detected in the eye-swabs, probably due to the low volume of sample material and the intracellular niche of the bacterium. A general poor response to treatment in all these cases indicates that clinicians should pay extra attention to intensity and duration of treatment if L. monocytogenes is identified in connection with equine kerato-conjunctivitis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26552393 View in PubMed
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[SANITARY SIGNIFICANCE OF SOIL SEA COASTS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268686
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M L Sidorenko
L S Buzoleva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):20-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Oceans and Seas
Russia
Soil - chemistry - standards
Soil Microbiology - standards
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Abstract
There was investigated the dynamics of growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in soils of sea coast (mid-flight and maritime soils). These bacteria were shown to reproduced well in all researched soils, preferring nevertheless maritime soils. The content of the humus was determined to be the one of the limiting factors restricting the multiplication of pathogenic bacteria in studied soils. Abiotic characteristic of soils of sea coast were established to render the direct positive influence on the preservation and reproduction of pathogenic microflora in them. This is promoted by a degree of a saturation by the bases, cation-exchange capacity, quantity of humus. In the formation of environmental policy it should be taken into account and the human-induced load on the soil should be limited
PubMed ID
26625609 View in PubMed
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High-pressure destruction kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes on pork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203314
Source
J Food Prot. 1999 Jan;62(1):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
D M Mussa
H S Ramaswamy
J P Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University, Ste. Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Food Prot. 1999 Jan;62(1):40-5
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Humans
Hydrostatic Pressure
Kinetics
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat - microbiology
Meat-Packing Industry
Swine
Abstract
Packaged fresh pork chops (30-g samples) containing an indigenous bacterial population of approximately 10(7) CFU/g were inoculated with 10(7) CFU of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A per g, heat sealed, and subjected to high-pressure processing at 200 to 400 MPa for up to 90 min. Total counts and the number of surviving L. monocytogenes cells were determined by a spread plate technique on tryptic soy agar and modified Oxford medium, respectively. The pressure destruction was characterized by a dual-behavior, consisting of a step change in the number of survivors (Pk0) with the application of a pressure pulse and a first-order rate drop in the number of survivors during the pressure hold period. Higher pressures resulted in higher rates of microbial inactivation, as indicated by their associated lower D values (and higher k values). The pressure sensitivities of the kinetic parameters were evaluated on the basis of Arrhenius and pressure death time (PDT)-type models. The results suggested that L. monocytogenes was more resistant to pressure inactivation than the indigenous microflora (the volume change of activation, deltaV* [Arrhenius model]), and Zp values (PDT model) were -4.17 x 10(-5) m3 mole(-1) and 134 MPa for indigenous microflora and -3.43 x 10(-5) m3 mole(-1) and 163 MPa for L. monocytogenes respectively.
PubMed ID
9921827 View in PubMed
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Human isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden during half a century (1958-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259026
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
G. Lopez-Valladares
W. Tham
V Singh Parihar
S. Helmersson
B. Andersson
S. Ivarsson
C. Johansson
H. Ringberg
I. Tjernberg
B. Henriques-Normark
M-L Danielsson-Tham
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Nov;142(11):2251-60
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Salmon
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Serotyping - methods
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes (n = 932) isolated in Sweden during 1958-2010 from human patients with invasive listeriosis were characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (AscI). Of the 932 isolates, 183 different PFGE types were identified, of which 83 were each represented by only one isolate. In all, 483 serovar 1/2a isolates were distributed over 114 PFGE types; 90 serovar 1/2b isolates gave 32 PFGE types; 21 serovar 1/2c isolates gave nine PFGE types; three serovar 3b isolates gave one PFGE type; and, 335 serovar 4b isolates gave 31 PFGE types. During the 1980s in Sweden, several serovar 4b cases were associated with the consumption of European raw soft cheese. However, as cheese-production hygiene has improved, the number of 4b cases has decreased. Since 1996, serovar 1/2a has been the dominant L. monocytogenes serovar in human listeriosis in Sweden. Therefore, based on current serovars and PFGE types, an association between human cases of listeriosis and the consumption of vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked salmon is suggested.
PubMed ID
24480252 View in PubMed
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Enhanced immunological memory responses to Listeria monocytogenes in rodents, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), adoptive transfer of DTH, and protective immunity, following Lactobacillus casei Shirota ingestion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57442
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003 Jan;10(1):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
R. de Waard
E. Claassen
G C A M Bokken
B. Buiting
J. Garssen
J G Vos
Author Affiliation
Department of the Science of Food of Animal Origin, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. dewaard@hi.nl
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003 Jan;10(1):59-65
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Hypersensitivity, Delayed
Immunity, Cellular
Immunologic Memory
Lactobacillus casei
Listeria monocytogenes - immunology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Spleen - cytology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
We have investigated the effect of orally administered Lactobacillus casei Shirota (L. casei) on immunological memory, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and acquired cellular resistance (ACR). The studies were performed in animal models in which the animals were rendered immune by a primary Listeria monocytogenes infection. It was shown that orally administered viable L. casei, and not heat-killed L. casei, enhanced significantly the antigen-specific DTH at 24 and 48 h in Wistar rats, Brown Norway rats, and BALB/c mice in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. L. casei had to be administered at least 3 days prior to the DTH assay at a daily dose of 10(9) CFU in order to induce significant effects. Long-term administration of 10(9) CFU of viable L. casei resulted in enhanced ACR, as demonstrated by reduced L. monocytogenes counts in the spleen and liver and diminished serum alanine aminotransferase activity after reinfection. Enhancement of cell-mediated immunological immune responses by L. casei was further established in an adoptive transfer study. Naïve recipient BALB/c mice, which were infused with nonadherent, immunized spleen cells from L. casei-fed donor BALB/c mice, showed significantly enhanced DTH responses at 24 and 48 h compared to recipient mice which received spleen cells from control donor mice. In conclusion, orally administered L. casei enhanced cell-mediated immunological memory responses. The effects relied on lactobacillus dose and viability as well as timing of supplementation and, further, appeared to be independent of host species or genetic background.
PubMed ID
12522040 View in PubMed
Less detail

Efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) for reducing microbial contamination on minimally-processed vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159055
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2008
Author
Maribel Abadias
Josep Usall
Márcia Oliveira
Isabel Alegre
Inmaculada Viñas
Author Affiliation
IRTA, Centre UdL-IRTA, XaRTA-Postharvest, 191 Rovira Roure, 25198-Lleida, Catalonia, Spain. isabel.abadias@irta.cat
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Mar 31;123(1-2):151-8
Date
Mar-31-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Escherichia coli O157 - drug effects - growth & development
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Lettuce - microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Pectobacterium carotovorum - drug effects - growth & development
Salmonella - drug effects - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Consumption of minimally-processed, or fresh-cut, fruit and vegetables has rapidly increased in recent years, but there have also been several reported outbreaks associated with the consumption of these products. Sodium hypochlorite is currently the most widespread disinfectant used by fresh-cut industries. Neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) is a novel disinfection system that could represent an alternative to sodium hypochlorite. The aim of the study was to determine whether NEW could replace sodium hypochlorite in the fresh-cut produce industry. The effects of NEW, applied in different concentrations, at different treatment temperatures and for different times, in the reduction of the foodborne pathogens Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and against the spoilage bacterium Erwinia carotovora were tested in lettuce. Lettuce was artificially inoculated by dipping it in a suspension of the studied pathogens at 10(8), 10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1), depending on the assay. The NEW treatment was always compared with washing with deionized water and with a standard hypochlorite treatment. The effect of inoculum size was also studied. Finally, the effect of NEW on the indigenous microbiota of different packaged fresh-cut products was also determined. The bactericidal activity of diluted NEW (containing approximately 50 ppm of free chlorine, pH 8.60) against E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. innocua and E. carotovora on lettuce was similar to that of chlorinated water (120 ppm of free chlorine) with reductions of 1-2 log units. There were generally no significant differences when treating lettuce with NEW for 1 and 3 min. Neither inoculation dose (10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1)) influenced the bacterial reduction achieved. Treating fresh-cut lettuce, carrot, endive, corn salad and 'Four seasons' salad with NEW 1:5 (containing about 50 ppm of free chlorine) was equally effective as applying chlorinated water at 120 ppm. Microbial reduction depended on the vegetable tested: NEW and sodium hypochlorite treatments were more effective on carrot and endive than on iceberg lettuce, 'Four seasons' salad and corn salad. The reductions of indigenous microbiota were smaller than those obtained with the artificially inoculated bacteria tested (0.5-1.2 log reduction). NEW seems to be a promising disinfection method as it would allow to reduce the amount of free chlorine used for the disinfection of fresh-cut produce by the food industry, as the same microbial reduction as sodium hypochlorite is obtained. This would constitute a safer, 'in situ', and easier to handle way of ensuring food safety.
PubMed ID
18237810 View in PubMed
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Surveillance of listeriosis in Finland during 1995-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168646
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(6):82-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
O. Lyytikäinen
U M Nakari
S. Lukinmaa
E. Kela
N. Nguyen Tran Minh
A. Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(6):82-5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fish Products - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Serotyping
Abstract
We analysed the surveillance data from listeriosis cases notified to the Finnish National Infectious Diseases Register between 1995 and 2004 and describe our recent experience in investigating clusters of listeriosis cases. The number of annual cases varied between 18 and 53 but no trends in incidence were identified (average annual incidence was 7 cases per million inhabitants). Only a few cases affected pregnant women or newborns. Most of the patients were elderly people with non-malignant underlying illnesses; 25% of them died from their infections. By routine sero- and genotyping of the listeria isolates, we detected several clusters; the vehicle for infection was only identified for two outbreaks. At least one quarter of listeriosis cases (78/315) was caused by a certain sero-genotype or closely related genotypes, which have also been found from vacuum-packed cold-smoked or cold-salted fish products. During 2000-2003, Finnish consumers were repeatedly informed about food precautions for risk groups. The information was also given to attending physicians and prenatal clinics.
PubMed ID
16801696 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antibacterial activity of alpha-, beta-unsaturated ketones of the furanic sequence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70219
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1966;28(4):77-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

116 records – page 1 of 12.