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148 records – page 1 of 15.

The -629C>A polymorphism in the CETP gene does not explain the association of TaqIB polymorphism with risk and age of myocardial infarction in Icelandic men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53840
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Eiriksdottir
M K Bolla
B. Thorsson
G. Sigurdsson
S E Humphries
V. Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Hjartavernd, Icelandic Heart Association, Lagmuli 9, 108, Reykjavik, Iceland. gudny@hjarta.is
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Homozygote
Humans
Iceland
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether the well-established effect of the common TaqIB polymorphism in intron 1 of the gene for cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), could be explained by the recently identified -629C>A functional polymorphism in the promoter. Non-fatal MI cases (388 male) and a control group of 794 healthy men were recruited from the 30 year long prospective Reykjavik Study. In the healthy men the frequency of the TaqIB B2 allele was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.44-0.50) and there was a strong allelic association with the -629A allele (D=-0.21, P
PubMed ID
11689220 View in PubMed
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Absence of association between genetic variation in the LIPC gene promoter and plasma lipoproteins in three Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5558
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
J H Brunt
T K Young
A J Hanley
B. Zinman
P W Connelly
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medicine, London, Ont., Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Arteriosclerosis - genetics
Canada
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Lipase - blood - genetics
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Liver - enzymology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Population Surveillance
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Trans-Activation (Genetics)
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
The promoter sequence variant -480T in the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) has been shown to be significantly associated with low post-heparin hepatic lipase activity. Some studies have also found that the -480T variant is associated with elevation in plasma HDL cholesterol. We tested for associations of LIPC -480T with plasma lipoprotein traits in samples taken from three distinct Canadian populations: 657 Alberta Hutterites, 328 Ontario Oji-Cree and 210 Keewatin Inuit. Plasma HL activity was not available for analyses. The LIPC -480T allele frequencies in these three groups, respectively, were 0.219, 0.527 and 0.383, and the prevalence of LIPC -480T/T homozygotes was, respectively, 0.042, 0.274 and 0.167. No significant association was found between LIPC -480T and plasma HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein AI concentration, after adjusting for covariates including gender and body mass index. There was no consistent relationship between the population mean plasma HDL cholesterol concentration and the population LIPC -480T frequency. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the common promoter variation in LIPC, which has been reported to be associated with variation in post heparin HL activity and HDL triglyceride concentration, is not always associated with variation in plasma HDL cholesterol concentration, possibly due to yet unspecified environmental or genetic factors.
PubMed ID
10487498 View in PubMed
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Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, and risk of ischaemic heart disease: six year follow up in the Copenhagen male study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11258
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):736-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1996
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiological Research Unit, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):736-41
Date
Mar-23-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between use of alcohol, concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and risk of ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN: Prospective study with controlling for several relevant confounders, including concentrations of other lipid fractions. SETTING: Copenhagen male study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 2826 men aged 53-74 years without overt ischaemic heart disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of ischaemic heart disease during a six year follow up period. RESULTS: 172 men (6.1%) had a first ischaemic heart disease event. There was an overall inverse association between alcohol intake and risk of ischaemic heart disease. The association was highly dependent on concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In men with a high concentration (> or = 5.25 mmol/l) cumulative incidence rates of ischaemic heart disease were 16.4% for abstainers, 8.7% for those who drank 1-21 beverages a week, and 4.4% for those who drank 22 or more beverages a week. With abstainers as reference and after adjustment for confounders, corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.4 (0.2 to 1.0; P or = 3.63 mmol/l who abstained from drinking alcohol was 43% (10% to 64%). CONCLUSIONS: In middle aged and elderly men the inverse association between alcohol consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease is highly dependent on the concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. These results support the suggestion that use of alcohol may in part explain the French paradox.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 1996 Sep-Oct;125(2):51
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Aug 10;313(7053):365-68760765
Erratum In: BMJ 1996 Apr 20;312(7037):1007
PubMed ID
8605458 View in PubMed
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An eight-month controlled study of a low-fat high-fibre diet: effects on blood lipids and blood pressure in healthy young subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62169
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Feb;46(2):95-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
B. Sandström
P. Marckmann
N. Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Feb;46(2):95-109
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Dietary Fiber - pharmacology
Energy intake
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The effects on blood lipids and blood pressure of a diet corresponding to present Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, i.e. less than 30% of energy from fat and with a fibre content exceeding 3 g/MJ, were studied in 18 men and 12 women (mean age, 24 years) under strict dietary control over 8 months. Blood sampling, blood pressure and body weight measurement were performed at four occasions on their habitual diet and once a month during the intervention period. An age-matched control group (17 men, 8 women) was followed with monthly measurements parallel to the intervention group. The habitual diets, assessed by 7-day records, showed an average fat content corresponding to 36% of energy. Initial levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol (X +/- SD) were 4.21 +/- 0.61 and 1.23 +/- 0.23 mmol/l for the men in the intervention group; 4.35 +/- 0.79 and 1.21 +/- 0.26 mmol/l for the male controls; 4.61 +/- 0.59 and 1.46 +/- 0.31 mmol/l for the women in the intervention group and 4.48 +/- 0.64 and 1.48 +/- 0.29 mmol/l for the female controls. Significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol throughout the experimental period were seen for both sexes in the intervention group. Total cholesterol fell 0.49 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.41-0.56) in the male subjects and 0.49 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.39-0.59) in the female subjects. The fall in HDL cholesterol was 0.16 mmol/l (95% C: 0.13-0.18) and 0.18 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.12-0.23), respectively. Total cholesterol changes were independent of initial values. All subjects were normotensive at the start of the study with an average blood pressure of 122/68 mmHg for men and 112/68 mmHg for the women. Systolic blood pressure dropped gradually and significantly in the male subjects of the intervention group. A minimum of 6 mmHg below initial values was noted after six months of dietary intervention. No significant changes in dietary intake and blood lipids were observed in the control group. Thus, changes of present dietary habits of young healthy Danish subjects to an intake in accordance with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 1989 will favourably affect suggested risk factors for disease.
PubMed ID
1313761 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drugs as predictors of type 2 diabetes among subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47792
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2000 Dec;50(3):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
U. Rajala
Q. Qiao
M. Laakso
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Aapistie 1, 90220, Oulu, Finland. urajala@ccoulu.fi
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2000 Dec;50(3):231-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology - physiopathology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
AIMS: to examine the incidence rate of progression to Type 2 diabetes and baseline prognostic risk factors, focusing on hypertension and antihypertensive medication, in a cohort (n=207) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). METHODS: after 2 and 4.6 (1. 9-6.4) years new cases of diabetes were diagnosed by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Hypertension (BP 160/95 or antihypertensive medication) was included in multiple regression analyses to assess the effect of risk factors on the development of diabetes. RESULTS: diabetes developed in 32 subjects (19%), an incidence of 41/1000 (95% CI 28-57/1000) person-years. In univariate analyses, progression to diabetes was associated with a high (>9.0 mmol/l) 2-h OGTT value (P=0.008), a high fasting insulin (>12.0 mU/l) level (P=0.000), a high triglyceride (>/=1.3 mmol/l) level (P=0.028), a high BMI (>/=28.0 kg/m(2)) (P=0.013) and hypertension (P=0.003). The risk for the development of diabetes was not increased in hypertensive subjects without antihypertensive medication compared with normotensive subjects (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.3-2. 6). However, it was increased in subjects with on medication, especially diuretics alone or in combination with other drugs. Hypertensive subjects on diuretics had higher levels of fasting insulin and triglycerides and higher BMIs at baseline than normotensive subjects. After adjustment for 2-h OGTT, fasting insulin, triglycerides and BMI, the OR for diabetes was 7.7 (95% CI 2.1-28.2) in hypertensive subjects using diuretics alone or in combination with other drugs and 2.6 (95% CI 1.0-6.7) in those using other drugs compared with normotensive subjects. The OR of diabetes corresponding to a one-unit increase in the 2-h OGTT concentration was 2.5 (95% CI 1.6-4.0) in the whole cohort. CONCLUSIONS: the rate of progression from IGT to Type 2 diabetes in this population was similar to that seen in other studies among Caucasian populations. The use of antihypertensive medication, especially diuretics, and a high 2-h OGTT level were significant predictors of subsequent deterioration to diabetes.
PubMed ID
11106838 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein A-IV polymorphism in Saami and Finns: frequency and effect on serum lipid levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75039
Source
Ann Med. 1998 Apr;30(2):218-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Lehtinen
P. Luoma
S. Näyhä
J. Hassi
C. Ehnholm
T. Nikkari
N. Peltonen
H. Jokela
T. Koivula
T. Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 1998 Apr;30(2):218-23
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Apolipoproteins A - genetics
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is a glycoprotein constituent of triglyceride-rich and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and may thus play an important role in lipid metabolism. In Finland two common isoforms (A-IV-1 and A-IV-2) of apoA-IV have been found. The isoforms are the result of the G to T substitution in the third base of the codon 360 in the apoA-IV-2 allele of the apoA-IV gene. The purpose of the study was to determine the apoA-IV allele frequencies in the Saami and the Finns, and to relate the apoA-IV phenotypes to serum lipids. The sample was drawn in connection with a Reindeer Herders' Health Survey performed in northern Finland in 1989. The study group included 248 men with known ethnic origin, Saami and Finns, who lived in the area of the nine northernmost municipalities of Finland. ApoA-IV phenotypes from 71 Saami (both parents Saami) and 177 Finns (both parents Finns) were determined by isoelectric focusing and Western blotting. Serum lipids were determined enzymatically. ApoA-IV allele frequencies in the Saami and the Finns were for A-IV-1 0.894 vs 0.944 and for A-IV-2 0.106 vs 0.056, respectively (chi2-test, P
PubMed ID
9667802 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein B and A-I in relation to serum cholesterol and triglycerides in 43,000 Swedish males and females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55179
Source
Int J Clin Lab Res. 1992;21(3):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
I. Jungner
G. Walldius
I. Holme
W. Kolar
E. Steiner
Author Affiliation
CALAB Medical Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Clin Lab Res. 1992;21(3):247-55
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Apolipoprotein A-I - analysis
Apolipoproteins B - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - etiology
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - epidemiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - blood - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Automated methods for the determination of apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-I were developed, tested, and applied in screening programs of large populations to improve information about the composition and degree of hyperlipoproteinemia. Apolipoproteins B and A-I, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured in 25,659 males and 18,144 females between 20 and 79 years of age, the majority subjectively healthy. The immunoturbidimetric methods used for apolipoproteins B and A-I were shown to be stable over time, and the errors of the methods were below 7%. Apolipoprotein B correlated with total cholesterol (r = 0.86, P less than 0.001) for each age decile group and for both sexes (r = 0.82-0.87, P less than 0.001). For a subsample comparable to the large population, apolipoprotein B correlated with cholesterol in low density (i.e., the atherogenic particle), r = 0.89, P less than 0.001. The mean values for apolipoprotein B increased with age for both sexes, with much higher levels in males than in females under 50 years of age. Apolipoprotein A-I was lower in males than in females in all age-groups. At all cholesterol levels males had higher apolipoprotein B, and at the same triglyceride level, also lower apolipoprotein A-I and hence a higher B/A-I ratio than females. Using apolipoprotein B and A-I (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) particles and adopting Swedish consensus criteria for the diagnosis of risk of ischemic heart disease, examples are given showing that many individuals, especially females, with high or borderline total serum cholesterol can be excluded from further investigation/treatment for hypercholesterolemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1591376 View in PubMed
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Are regional variations in ischaemic heart disease related to differences in coronary risk factors? The project 'myocardial infarction in mid-Sweden'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48673
Source
Eur Heart J. 1991 Mar;12(3):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
C. Nerbrand
L. Olsson
K. Svärdsudd
S. Kullman
G. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Family Medicine, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1991 Mar;12(3):309-14
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previous report, a large regional variation was reported in total mortality and mortality rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in mid-Sweden. In this report, IHD prevalence and risk factor data are presented. A postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of men aged 45-64 years in each of 40 communities. 14,675 men (88%) responded. Based on a validity study, IHD cases were defined as those with a history of myocardial infarction and/or angina pectoris. Age, smoking habits, antihypertensive treatment, body mass index, food habits, stress and physical activity during leisure time were used as risk factors. IHD prevalence showed the same geographical variation as IHD mortality, with a low prevalence in the east and a high prevalence in the west. There was a moderate variation in risk factor levels over the 40 communities. When this variation was taken into account the geographical IHD variation was somewhat smaller but still substantial. Other factors may involve socio-economics, drinking water qualities, mineral soil content or other environmental factors. Which of these cause the largest IHD variation is at present unknown, but is subject to systematic examination in this project.
PubMed ID
2040312 View in PubMed
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Association between blood pressure and serum lipids in a population. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12039
Source
Circulation. 1991 Apr;83(4):1305-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
K H Bønaa
D S Thelle
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Circulation. 1991 Apr;83(4):1305-14
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND. High blood pressure has been associated with elevated atherogenic blood lipid fractions, but epidemiological surveys often give inconsistent results across population subgroups. A better understanding of the relation between blood pressure and blood lipids may provide insight into the mechanism(s) whereby hypertension is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS. We assessed the cross-sectional relations of serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol (total minus HDL cholesterol), and triglyceride levels with blood pressure in a population of 8,081 men 20-54 years old and 7,663 women 20-49 years old. Stratified analyses and multivariable methods were used to control for potential confounding anthropometric and lifestyle variables. Total and non-HDL cholesterol levels increased significantly with increasing systolic or diastolic blood pressure in both sexes. Men 20-29 years old had steeper regression slopes for blood pressure by total cholesterol level than did women of similar age. In men, the association between blood pressure and total cholesterol level decreased with age, whereas in women, it increased with age. Body mass index modified the relation, whereas smoking, physical activity, and alcohol consumption had little influence on the association. Triglyceride levels increased with blood pressure, but this relation was weak in lean subjects. HDL cholesterol level correlated positively with blood pressure in population subgroups having a high alcohol consumption. CONCLUSION. These results support the hypothesis that there are biological interrelations between blood pressure and blood lipids that may influence the mechanisms whereby blood pressure is associated with risk of coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
2013148 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.