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154 records – page 1 of 16.

[Age and dynamics of the chief blood lipid indices among the adult population of Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240688
Source
Kardiologiia. 1984 Apr;24(4):56-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984
Author
A N Klimov
D B Shestov
V F Triufanov
E G Alksnis
N P Teriukova
Source
Kardiologiia. 1984 Apr;24(4):56-62
Date
Apr-1984
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL
Cholesterol, LDL
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Russia
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Variations in the blood levels of total cholesterol (C), triglycerides, low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol ( LDLPC , HDLPC ) and atherogenicity ratio were examined over time in 4841 men and 2323 women living in Leningrad. The mean values of the parameters studied were established for different age groups. Considerable differences were revealed in the blood lipid profile in men versus women. Higher levels of HDLPC and lower concentrations of LDLPC in women under 50 as compared with age-matched men account for a later development and milder course of coronary heart disease in premenopausal women.
PubMed ID
6233447 View in PubMed
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Alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels in relation to acute myocardial infarction and its risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55926
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 May;40(3):239-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
O. Wiklund
G. Fager
I H Craig
C E Wilhelmsson
A. Vedin
S O Olofsson
G. Bondjers
L. Wilhelmsen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 May;40(3):239-47
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Exertion
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - etiology
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
During 1975-1977 twenty-nine males surviving acute myocardial infarction at an age between 40-44 years were registered in Gothenburg, Sweden. Twenty-five of these were studied and compared with two control groups. One group, the reference group (RG, n = 76), was randomly selected from the male population from which the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) group was derived. A second group, the matched control group (MC, n = 47), consisted of men with no history of coronary heart disease, matched with patients for age, serum cholesterol and body weight index. Serum triglyceride levels were higher and alphalipoprotein cholesterol lower in the AMI group than in RG. Prior to infarction, patients had a higher degree of physical activity at work and a higher tobacco consumption than RG. When AMI cases were compared with MC subjects lower alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels were found in AMI, and they also had a higher tobacco consumption prior to infarction. There was a negative correlation between alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels and tobacco consumption in the RG. The differences in alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels between AMI cases and controls could not attributed to smoking habits, but smoking may at least to some extent exert its effect as a risk factor through influence on alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels.
PubMed ID
7444341 View in PubMed
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Alterations in plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins before the age of 40 in heterozygotes for lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212491
Source
J Lipid Res. 1996 Mar;37(3):640-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
S. Bijvoet
S E Gagné
S. Moorjani
C. Gagné
H E Henderson
J C Fruchart
J. Dallongeville
P. Alaupovic
M. Prins
J J Kastelein
M R Hayden
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Lipid Res. 1996 Mar;37(3):640-50
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Apolipoproteins - blood
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Heterozygote
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type I - blood - genetics
Lipoprotein Lipase - deficiency - genetics
Lipoproteins - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Pedigree
Phenotype
Quebec
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We have assessed the expression of heterozygosity for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency by studying a single large French Canadian family comprising 92 persons including 21 carriers of the catalytically defective P207L mutation. Phenotypic changes distinguishing heterozygotes from controls were seen early, before the age of 40 and often before 20 years of age. In the total cohort these changes included an elevation in the mean very low density (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) triglyceride (+69%; P = 0.01 and +40%; P = 0.001) and cholesterol (+51%; P = 0.03 and +67%; P = 0.007) and apoB levels but decreased HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol, (-32%; P = 0.01 and -15%; P = 0.002 respectively). While the lipid compositions of VLDL and IDL were similar between heterozygotes and controls, the low density (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) of carriers were triglyceride enriched. Heterozygotes also had a markedly lower apoC-III ratio (apoC-III in supernatant/apoC-III in heparin precipitate) (1.46 vs. 3.86 P = 1 x 10(-4)) indicating a substantial enrichment of VLDL and IDL with apoC-III and depletion of HDL apoC-III supporting this ratio as an effective index for efficiency of lipolysis. LpA-I was markedly reduced (0.34 vs. 0.43 P = 1 x 10(-5)) showing that levels of this particle are partly dependent on LPL catalytic activity. Heterozygotes manifest from an early age with a markedly reduced HDL, LpA-I, apoC-III ratio and an increased TC/HDLc ratio which would predict a relatively increased risk of premature coronary artery disease, compared to their normal siblings.
PubMed ID
8728325 View in PubMed
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Altered transfer of cholesteryl esters and phospholipids in plasma from alcohol abusers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10964
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):2940-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
M J Liinamaa
M L Hannuksela
Y A Kesäniemi
M J Savolainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):2940-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Alcoholism - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biological Transport
Carrier Proteins - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol Esters - blood
Comparative Study
Glycoproteins
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Male
Membrane Proteins - blood
Middle Aged
Phospholipid Transfer Proteins
Phospholipids - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temperance
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The net mass transfer (NMT) of cholesteryl esters (CEs), triglycerides (TGs), and phospholipids (PLs) between lipoproteins was measured after incubation of fresh plasma for up to 2 hours from 18 male alcohol abusers and 17 male volunteer control subjects. In alcohol abusers the mean value of CE NMT was 3.7 nmol.mL-1.h-1 from apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (apoB-containing lipoproteins) to HDL and in control subjects 8.7 nmol.mL-1.h-1 from HDL to apoB-containing lipoproteins. The NMT of PL was higher in alcohol abusers than in control subjects (35.0 vs 11.6 nmol.mL-1.h-1 from apoB-containing lipoproteins to HDL, respectively), and plasma PL transfer protein (TP) activity was 33% higher (P
PubMed ID
9409280 View in PubMed
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Ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284204
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Mai C Arlien-Søborg
Astrid S Schmedes
Z A Stokholm
M B Grynderup
J P Bonde
C S Jensen
Å M Hansen
T W Frederiksen
J. Kristiansen
K L Christensen
J M Vestergaard
S P Lund
H A Kolstad
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Manufacturing Industry
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Occupational and residential noise exposure has been related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alteration of serum lipid levels has been proposed as a possible causal pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides when accounting for well-established predictors of lipid levels.
This cross-sectional study included 424 industrial workers and 84 financial workers to obtain contrast in noise exposure levels. They provided a serum sample and wore portable dosimeters that every 5-s recorded ambient noise exposure levels during a 24-h period. We extracted measurements obtained during work and calculated the full-shift mean ambient noise level. For 331 workers who kept a diary on the use of a hearing protection device (HPD), we subtracted 10 dB from every noise recording obtained during HPD use and estimated the mean full-shift noise exposure level at the ear.
Mean ambient noise level was 79.9 dB (A) [range 55.0-98.9] and the mean estimated level at the ear 77.8 dB (A) [range 55.0-94.2]. Ambient and at-the-ear noise levels were strongly associated with increasing levels of triglycerides, cholesterol-HDL ratio, and decreasing levels of HDL-cholesterol, but only in unadjusted analyses that did not account for HPD use and other risk factors.
No associations between ambient or at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels were observed. This indicates that a causal pathway between occupational and residential noise exposure and cardiovascular disease does not include alteration of lipid levels.
PubMed ID
27319006 View in PubMed
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Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123466
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Patricia Blackburn
Isabelle Lemieux
Benoît Lamarche
Jean Bergeron
Patrice Perron
Gérald Tremblay
Daniel Gaudet
Jean-Pierre Després
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec (Québec), Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Logistic Models
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Particle Size
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
It has been suggested that a reduced HDL particle size could be another feature of the atherogenic dyslipidemia found among viscerally obese subjects.
To investigate, in women, the relationship between HDL particle size and coronary artery disease (CAD).
Average HDL particle size was measured in a sample of 239 women on whom CAD was assessed by angiography.
Overall, women who had CAD were characterized by a deteriorated fasting metabolic risk profile, which was accompanied by smaller HDL particles compared to women without CAD (80.4???2.2?? vs. 81.5???2.7??, p?
PubMed ID
22695528 View in PubMed
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[Arterial pressure and concentrations of blood lipids in the populations of Moscow and Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241798
Source
Kardiologiia. 1983 Jul;23(7):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
D B Shestov
A D Deev
M A Akhmeteli
E N Gerasimova
A A Zadoia
Source
Kardiologiia. 1983 Jul;23(7):59-64
Date
Jul-1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Physical Exertion
Risk
Russia
Smoking
Abstract
Epidemiological investigation of two randomized groups of men born in 1916-1935 (3908 men in Moscow, 3907 in Leningrad) has shown that in both populations there is a direct relationship between the arterial pressure (AP) and the level of total cholesterol (CS), triglycerides (TG) and cholesterol lipoproteids of high density (CS-LPHD) in blood plasma. A strong correlation between the level of the systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and age has been established. Age variations of the lipid levels were insignificant. The total CS, TG, SAP levels and the diastolic AP increase with the growth of the relative body weight, while the CS-LPHD level decreases. In the group engaged in manual labour the total CS and TG levels are simultaneously lowered and those of CS-LPHD and SAP elevated. There is a direct relationship between the level of CS-LPHD, AP and alcohol intake. Smoking somewhat lowers the level of CS-LPHD and AP. The direct relationship between AP and the level of CS-LPHD remains after complex analysis including all the factors studied.
PubMed ID
6225900 View in PubMed
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The Association between genetic variations of CHI3L1, levels of the encoded glycoprotein YKL-40 and the lipid profile in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119811
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47094
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Stine Brinkløv Thomsen
Camilla Noelle Rathcke
Tea Skaaby
Allan Linneberg
Henrik Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Dept. of Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. Stine.Brinkloev.Thomsen@.regionh.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47094
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipokines - genetics
Adult
Aged
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - genetics
Lectins - genetics
Lipids - blood - genetics
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood - genetics
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Triglycerides - blood - genetics
Abstract
The inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 seems to play a role in atherosclerosis and is elevated in patients with obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the YKL-40 encoding gene, CHI3L1, are associated with inter-individual YKL-40 levels. One study has described an association between a promoter polymorphism of CHI3L1 and levels of low density lipoprotein. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of YKL-40 on lipid parameters by determining the association between polymorphisms of CHI3L1, serum YKL-40 and levels of the differentiated lipid profile in a Danish general population.
12 SNPs of CHI3L1 were genotyped, and serum YKL-40 and parameters of the lipid profile were measured in 2,656 Danes. Lipid profile and genotypes were available in another Danish population (n?=?6,784) for replication. Cholesterol and triglyceride levels increased with increasing YKL-40 quartile (both p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23071724 View in PubMed
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Association between trans fatty acid intake and cardiovascular risk factors in Europe: the TRANSFAIR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61814
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):126-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L P van de Vijver
A F Kardinaal
C. Couet
A. Aro
A. Kafatos
L. Steingrimsdottir
J A Amorim Cruz
O. Moreiras
W. Becker
J M van Amelsvoort
S. Vidal-Jessel
I. Salminen
J. Moschandreas
N. Sigfússon
I. Martins
A. Carbajal
A. Ytterfors
G. Poppel
Author Affiliation
Department of Consumer Research and Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Zeist, The Netherlands. VandeVijver@Voeding.TNO.NL
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Feb;54(2):126-35
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Europe
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - analysis
Female
Humans
Isomerism
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of trans fatty acids (TFA) have been found to exert an undesirable effect on serum lipid profiles, and thus may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVES: Investigation of the association between TFA intake and serum lipids. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study in eight European countries (Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden) among 327 men and 299 women (50-65 y). Using a dietary history method, food consumption was assessed and TFA intake was calculated with recent figures on TFA levels of foods, collected in the TRANSFAIR study. RESULTS: Mean (+/-s.d.) TFA intake was 2.40+/-1.53 g/day for men and 1.98+/-1.49 g/day for women (0.87+/-0.48% and 0. 95+/-0.55% of energy, respectively), with the highest consumption in Iceland and the lowest in the Mediterranean countries. No associations were found between total TFA intake and LDL, HDL or LDL/HDL ratio after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Additional adjustment for other fatty acid clusters resulted in a significant inverse trend between total TFA intake and total cholesterol (Ptrend
PubMed ID
10694783 View in PubMed
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154 records – page 1 of 16.