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25 records – page 1 of 3.

A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aberrations in plasma phospholipid fatty acids in lung cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128904
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Rachel A Murphy
Taylor F Bureyko
Marina Mourtzakis
Quincy S Chu
M Thomas Clandinin
Tony Reiman
Vera C Mazurak
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, 4-126A Li Ka Shing Centre, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
Lipids. 2012 Apr;47(4):363-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Canada
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Phospholipids - analysis
Survival Rate
Weight Loss
Abstract
Abnormalities in lipid metabolism have been frequently observed in cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis. However, a detailed, longitudinal characterization of fatty acid status is lacking. This study aimed to assess plasma phospholipid fatty acids before chemotherapy, immediately after and 1 month following chemotherapy in a group of 50 patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer and explore factors which may contribute to aberrations in fatty acids. Their mean ± SD characteristics: age 64 ± 8.5 years, 75% advanced stage disease, body mass index 27.0 ± 5.4 kg/m², 6 month weight loss -4.6 ± 6.1%. Compared to patients with early stage disease, patients with advanced disease had abnormal fatty acid profiles including significantly lower (P
PubMed ID
22160451 View in PubMed
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[Activation of reparative processes by phospholipid preparation in the affected organs and tissues in neonathal enteropathology of calves]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83018
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2004 Nov-Dec;76(6):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hryshchenko V A
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2004 Nov-Dec;76(6):111-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - blood - drug therapy
Dyspepsia - blood - drug therapy - veterinary
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Phospholipids - chemistry - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The peculiarities of dynamics of quantitative changes of some classes of lipid and phospholipid spectra of blood plasma of calves recovered after dyspepsia were studied. Obtained reliable changes of the blood plasma lipidogrammas testify to development of dyslipidemia. It is characterized by hypercholesterolemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia of recovered 30 days old calves 3 weeks after diseases symptoms past. These changes give evidence concerning deficiency of phosphatides choline fraction - main structural components of cell membranes. It was established that changes of lipid and phospholipid spectra of blood plasma caused by enteropathology can be corrected by the inclusion of reparative therapy preparations to dyspepsia treatment plan in particular--experimental phospholipid containing a drug, which is prepared on the basis of milk phospholipids--its natural source for newborn calves.
PubMed ID
16350753 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics in second-generation antipsychotic-naïve French Canadian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138355
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Geneviève Roy
Alain Bedard
Paul-André Desmarais
France Jourdain
Sylvie Allen
Danielle Michaud
Leila Ben Amor
Author Affiliation
CHAU Hotel Dieu de Levis, Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Levis, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Weight Gain - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients receiving second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) may experience secondary metabolic effects such as weight gain, as well as changes in lipid and glucose metabolism. These effects are well documented in adults; however, fewer studies are available concerning their occurrence and their evolution in children and adolescents.
The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age-dependent variation in the metabolic effects of SGAs in a drug-naïve population.
Charts of 232 French Canadian patients participating in a program monitoring the metabolic effects of SGAs were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 85 SGA-naïve patients were selected, including 58 youths and 27 adults. Changes, relative to baseline, in weight, body mass index, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride), and fasting blood glucose were assessed, with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months.
With respect to weight gain, in both the youth and adult groups, body mass index significantly increased from baseline at 3 months (10.1% [p?
PubMed ID
21186966 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of interaction of adenylate cyclase modulators and phosphoinositide cell signaling systems with lipid langmuir monolayers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77749
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Nov-Dec;78(6):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liakhov O M
Prokopenko V V
Prokopenko R A
Mohylevych S Ie
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Nov-Dec;78(6):64-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenylate Cyclase - antagonists & inhibitors - chemistry
Cell Membrane - drug effects - metabolism
Cluster analysis
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Membranes, Artificial
Models, Biological
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Phosphatidylcholines - chemistry
Phosphatidylinositols - antagonists & inhibitors - chemistry
Signal Transduction - drug effects
Abstract
Interaction of two groups of bioregulators, which oppositely affect activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphoinositide cellular signaling systems, with the Langmuir monolayer films made of natural lecithin was studied. Most significant influence on the structural and energy characteristics of lipid monolayers was revealed for the group of bioregulators, which inhibit polyphosphoinositide signaling system or/and activate adenylate cyclase signaling system. It is shown, that using the cluster analysis the bioregulators can be divided into two groups according to general orientation of their action on the considered systems of transduction of a signal.
PubMed ID
17494320 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of the therapy of patients with type II diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81793
Source
Lik Sprava. 2000 Oct-Dec;(7-8):92-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bodnar P M
Kononenko L O
Source
Lik Sprava. 2000 Oct-Dec;(7-8):92-4
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight - drug effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Insulin Resistance
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - drug therapy - metabolism
Abstract
The article focuses on the action of sugar-lowering drugs of different groups (metformin, acarbose, gliquidone, diacamf, food fibre, in patients with type II diabetes mellitus presenting with the metabolic syndrome. All studied medicinal agents compensated the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, lowered the body mass, delayed the development of atherosclerosis, which facts were found to alleviate the manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.
PubMed ID
16786661 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic ingestion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose induces cardiac vacuolization and increases mortality in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98552
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2010 Mar 15;243(3):332-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2010
Author
Robin K Minor
Daniel L Smith
Alex M Sossong
Susmita Kaushik
Suresh Poosala
Edward L Spangler
George S Roth
Mark Lane
David B Allison
Rafael de Cabo
Donald K Ingram
Julie A Mattison
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2010 Mar 15;243(3):332-9
Date
Mar-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Glands - drug effects - pathology
Animals
Autophagy - drug effects
Blotting, Western
Body Temperature - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Deoxyglucose - pharmacology - toxicity
Glucose - metabolism
Glycogen - metabolism
Heart - drug effects
Insulin - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Male
Myocardium - pathology - ultrastructure
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Survival Analysis
Vacuoles - drug effects - ultrastructure
Abstract
Calorie restriction (CR), the purposeful reduction of energy intake with maintenance of adequate micronutrient intake, is well known to extend the lifespan of laboratory animals. Compounds like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) that can recapitulate the metabolic effects of CR are of great interest for their potential to extend lifespan. 2DG treatment has been shown to have potential therapeutic benefits for treating cancer and seizures. 2DG has also recapitulated some hallmarks of the CR phenotype including reduced body temperature and circulating insulin in short-term rodent trials, but one chronic feeding study in rats found toxic effects. The present studies were performed to further explore the long-term effects of 2DG in vivo. First we demonstrate that 2DG increases mortality of male Fischer-344 rats. Increased incidence of pheochromocytoma in the adrenal medulla was also noted in the 2DG treated rats. We reconfirm the cardiotoxicity of 2DG in a 6-week follow-up study evaluating male Brown Norway rats and a natural form of 2DG in addition to again examining effects in Fischer-344 rats and the original synthetic 2DG. High levels of both 2DG sources reduced weight gain secondary to reduced food intake in both strains. Histopathological analysis of the hearts revealed increasing vacuolization of cardiac myocytes with dose, and tissue staining revealed the vacuoles were free of both glycogen and lipid. We did, however, observe higher expression of both cathepsin D and LC3 in the hearts of 2DG-treated rats which indicates an increase in autophagic flux. Although a remarkable CR-like phenotype can be reproduced with 2DG treatment, the ultimate toxicity of 2DG seriously challenges 2DG as a potential CR mimetic in mammals and also raises concerns about other therapeutic applications of the compound.
PubMed ID
20026095 View in PubMed
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Dietary fish protein alters blood lipid concentrations and hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the rat model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80453
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Oct;96(4):674-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Shukla Anjali
Bettzieche Anja
Hirche Frank
Brandsch Corinna
Stangl Gabriele I
Eder Klaus
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg, Emil-Abderhalden-Strasse 26, D-06108 Halle/Saale, Germany.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Oct;96(4):674-82
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - analysis - blood
Animals
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Dietary Proteins - pharmacology
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fish Proteins - pharmacology
Food Analysis - methods
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Homeostasis - genetics
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects - genetics
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism
Male
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
It is known that various dietary plant proteins are capable of influencing the lipid metabolism of human subjects and animals when compared with casein. Less, however, is known about the effects of fish protein on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism. Therefore, two experiments were conducted in which rats were fed diets containing 200 g of either fish protein, prepared from Alaska pollack fillets, or casein, which served as control, per kilogram, over 20 and 22 d, respectively. As parameters of lipid metabolism, the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the plasma and liver, the faecal excretion of bile acids and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid homeostasis were determined. In both experiments, rats fed fish protein had higher concentrations of cholesteryl esters in the liver, a lower concentration of cholesterol in the HDL fraction (rho > 1.063 kg/l) and lower plasma triacylglycerol concentrations than rats fed casein (P
PubMed ID
17010226 View in PubMed
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Dietary spices in health and diseases (II).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149813
Source
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2008 Oct-Dec;52(4):327-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
K P Kochhar
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.
Source
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2008 Oct-Dec;52(4):327-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cell Membrane Permeability - drug effects
Diet
Endothelium, Vascular - drug effects
Gastric Acid - secretion
Gastrointestinal Motility - drug effects
Gastrointestinal Tract - drug effects
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Peptic Ulcer - chemically induced
Plant Preparations - pharmacology
Reproduction - drug effects
Spices
Abstract
Dietary spices influence various systems in the body such as gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, reproductive and nervous systems resulting in diverse metabolic and physiologic actions. As inheritors of a long tradition of the use of spices in diet as well as in indigenous medicines we know that these are treatments often honed over centuries with well-established reputations for efficacy. A rigorous review of these manifold beneficial effects may provide a fair basis for prescription in many clinical conditions where confirmed modern drug treatments do not exist or as adjunct therapy to reduce the dosage or the, risk of side effects. This essay attempts to adjudicate the traditional use of dietary spices based on factual research evidence for their multivalent actions as health promoting dietary additives as well as putative therapeutic agents.
PubMed ID
19585751 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic actions of dietary apple polyphenol in rats fed cholesterol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83655
Source
Lipids. 2006 Feb;41(2):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Osada Kyoichi
Suzuki Takashi
Kawakami Yuki
Senda Mineo
Kasai Atsushi
Sami Manabu
Ohta Yutaka
Kanda Tomomasa
Ikeda Mitsuo
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8224, Japan. kyochi@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp
Source
Lipids. 2006 Feb;41(2):133-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Body Weight - drug effects
Cholesterol 7-alpha-Hydroxylase - metabolism
Cholesterol, Dietary
Feces - chemistry
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipids - blood
Liver - drug effects
Male
Malus - chemistry
Organ Size - drug effects
Phenols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Steroids - metabolism
Abstract
The dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of dietary apple polyphenol (AP) from unripe apple, which contains approximately 85% catechin oligomers (procyanidins), were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 wk of age) given a purified diet containing 0.5% cholesterol. Dietary AP at 0.5 and 1.0% levels significantly decreased the liver cholesterol level compared with that in the control (AP-free diet-fed) group. Dietary AP also significantly lowered the serum cholesterol level compared with that in the control group. However, the HDL cholesterol level was significantly higher in the 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Accordingly, the ratio of HDL-cholesterol/total cholesterol was significantly higher in the 0.5% AP-fed group and 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Moreover, the atherogenic indices in the 0.5 and 1.0% AP-fed groups were significantly lower than those in the control group. The activity of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase tended to be increased by dietary AP in a dose-dependent manner. In accord with this observation, dietary AP increased the excretion of acidic steroids in feces. Dietary AP also significantly promoted the fecal excretion of neutral steroids in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that dietary AP at a 0.5 or 1.0% level exerts hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects through the promotion of cholesterol catabolism and inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol.
PubMed ID
17707979 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.