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164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173671
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Amar A Sethi
Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Arginine - chemistry
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Denmark
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Glutamic Acid - chemistry
Glutamine - chemistry
Glycine - chemistry
Haplotypes
Heart rate
Heterozygote
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Isoleucine - chemistry
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated with elevated blood pressure.
We genotyped 9185 individuals from the adult Danish general population.
Allele frequencies of 16Arg, 27Glu, and 164Ile were 0.38, 0.44, and 0.01, respectively. Among women never treated with antihypertensive medication those heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had increased diastolic blood pressure (P=0.02). Women heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.30-2.86). Finally, women double heterozygous for Thr164Ile and Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg versus non-carriers at all 3 loci had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 2.49 (1.28-4.85) or 3.19 (1.46-6.97). In men, blood pressure was not influenced by this genetic variation.
In women Thr164Ile heterozygosity is associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, and represent a risk factor for elevated blood pressure in women in the general population. This was most pronounced in those women also heterozygous for Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg.
PubMed ID
16041242 View in PubMed
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The -250G>A promoter variant in hepatic lipase associates with elevated fasting serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol modulated by interaction with physical activity in a study of 16,156 Danish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85800
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andreasen Camilla H
Andersen Mette K
Albrechtsen Anders
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Jørgensen Torben
Schmitz Ole
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 1, Gentofte, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fasting - blood
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipase - genetics
Motor Activity - genetics - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein by involvement in reverse cholesterol transport and the formation of atherogenic small dense low-density lipoprotein. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the impact of variants in LIPC on metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes in a large sample of Danes. Because behavioral factors influence hepatic lipase activity, we furthermore examined possible gene-environment interactions in the population-based Inter99 study. DESIGN: The LIPC -250G>A (rs2070895) variant was genotyped in the Inter99 study (n = 6070), the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care Denmark screening cohort of individuals with risk factors for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 8662), and in additional type 2 diabetic patients (n = 1,064) and glucose-tolerant control subjects (n = 360). RESULTS: In the Inter99 study, the A allele of rs2070895 associated with a 0.057 mmol/liter [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.039-0.075] increase in fasting serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 8 x 10(-10)) supported by association in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care study [0.038 mmol/liter per allele (95% CI 0.024-0.053); P = 2 x 10(-7)). The allelic effect on HDL-c was modulated by interaction with self-reported physical activity (P(interaction) = 0.002) because vigorous physically active homozygous A-allele carriers had a 0.30 mmol/liter (95% CI 0.22-0.37) increase in HDL-c compared with homozygous G-allele carriers. CONCLUSIONS: We validate the association of LIPC promoter variation with fasting serum HDL-c and present data supporting an interaction with physical activity implying an increased effect on HDL-c in vigorous physically active subjects carrying the -250 A allele. This interaction may have potential implications for public health and disease prevention.
PubMed ID
18364377 View in PubMed
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The -629C>A polymorphism in the CETP gene does not explain the association of TaqIB polymorphism with risk and age of myocardial infarction in Icelandic men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53840
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Eiriksdottir
M K Bolla
B. Thorsson
G. Sigurdsson
S E Humphries
V. Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Hjartavernd, Icelandic Heart Association, Lagmuli 9, 108, Reykjavik, Iceland. gudny@hjarta.is
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Homozygote
Humans
Iceland
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether the well-established effect of the common TaqIB polymorphism in intron 1 of the gene for cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), could be explained by the recently identified -629C>A functional polymorphism in the promoter. Non-fatal MI cases (388 male) and a control group of 794 healthy men were recruited from the 30 year long prospective Reykjavik Study. In the healthy men the frequency of the TaqIB B2 allele was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.44-0.50) and there was a strong allelic association with the -629A allele (D=-0.21, P
PubMed ID
11689220 View in PubMed
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ABCB1 and GST polymorphisms associated with TP53 status in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78779
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Nordgard Silje H
Ritchie Marylyn D
Jensrud Sigrid D
Motsinger Alison A
Alnaes Grethe I G
Lemmon Gordon
Berg Marianne
Geisler Stephanie
Moore Jason H
Lønning Per Eystein
Børresen-Dale Anne-Lise
Kristensen Vessela N
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Doxorubicin - therapeutic use
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Norway
Organic Anion Transporters - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Recombination, Genetic
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Many environmental and genetic factors influence the development of chemoresistance. The goal of this study was to characterize the genetic variation in the ABCB1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes, as well as the haplotype structure in the ABCB1 gene. METHODS: Variants in these genes were studied in 109 healthy controls and 93 breast cancer cases, both of Caucasian origin. The cases were analyzed in relation to TP53 mutation status and response to doxorubicin. Both single and multiple single nucleotide polymorphism analyses were performed. RESULTS: Chi-square analyses revealed a significant association between TP53 mutation status and both the GA genotype of ABCB1 exon 11 (Ser400Asn) and the GG genotype of GSTP1 (Ile105Val; P
PubMed ID
17301692 View in PubMed
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Accurate Non-parametric Estimation of Recent Effective Population Size from Segments of Identity by Descent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268195
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):404-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-3-2015
Author
Sharon R Browning
Brian L Browning
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):404-18
Date
Sep-3-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes - genetics
Computer simulation
Finland
Genetics, Population - methods
Great Britain
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Models, Genetic
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Population Density
Software
Abstract
Existing methods for estimating historical effective population size from genetic data have been unable to accurately estimate effective population size during the most recent past. We present a non-parametric method for accurately estimating recent effective population size by using inferred long segments of identity by descent (IBD). We found that inferred segments of IBD contain information about effective population size from around 4 generations to around 50 generations ago for SNP array data and to over 200 generations ago for sequence data. In human populations that we examined, the estimates of effective size were approximately one-third of the census size. We estimate the effective population size of European-ancestry individuals in the UK four generations ago to be eight million and the effective population size of Finland four generations ago to be 0.7 million. Our method is implemented in the open-source IBDNe software package.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26299365 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
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Adipokine genes and prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154045
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Feb 15;124(4):869-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2009
Author
Moore SC
Leitzmann MF
Albanes D
Weinstein SJ
Snyder K
Virtamo J
Ahn J
Mayne ST
Yu H
Peters U
Gunter MJ
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. moorest@mail.nih.gov
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Feb 15;124(4):869-76
Date
Feb-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipokines - metabolism
Adiponectin - metabolism
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Cytokines - metabolism
Finland
Humans
Insulin - metabolism
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Interleukin-6 - metabolism
Leptin - metabolism
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - metabolism - pathology
Receptors, Leptin - metabolism
Risk
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - metabolism
Abstract
Adiposity and adipocyte-derived cytokines have been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. However, the relationship of adipokine gene variants with prostate cancer risk has not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore examined common variants of the IL6, LEP, LEPR, TNF and ADIPOQ genes in relation to prostate cancer in a case-control study nested within a large cohort of Finnish men. The study sample consisted of 1,053 cases of prostate cancer, diagnosed over an average 11 years of follow up, and 1,053 controls matched to the cases on age, intervention group and date of baseline blood draw. Logistic regression was used to model the relative odds of prostate cancer. We also examined genotypes in relation to serum insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-1:IGFBP-3 among 196 controls. Variant alleles at three loci (-14858A>G, -13973A>C, -13736C>A) in a potential regulatory region of the LEP gene conferred a statistically significant 20% reduced risk of prostate cancer. For example, at the -14858A>G locus, heterozygotes and homozygotes for the A allele had an odds ratio (OR) of prostate cancer of 0.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 0.93] and 0.79 (95% CI 0.60, 1.04), respectively. At 13288G>A, relative to the GG genotype, the AA genotype was associated with a suggestive increased risk of prostate cancer (OR = 1.29; 95% CI 0.99,1.67; p(trend) = 0.05). Polymorphisms in the IL6, LEPR, TNF and ADIPOQ genes were not associated with prostate cancer. Allelic variants in the LEP gene are related to prostate cancer risk, supporting a role for leptin in prostate carcinogenesis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19035456 View in PubMed
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Age and origin of two common MLH1 mutations predisposing to hereditary colon cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210534
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1996 Dec;59(6):1243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
A L Moisio
P. Sistonen
J. Weissenbach
A. de la Chapelle
P. Peltomäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1996 Dec;59(6):1243-51
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Chromosome Mapping - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis - genetics
DNA Repair - genetics
DNA, Satellite - genetics
Finland
Genetic markers
Genetics, Population
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Abstract
Two mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1, referred to as mutations 1 and 2, are frequent among Finnish kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). In order to assess the ages and origins of these mutations, we constructed a map of 15 microsatellite markers around MLH1 and used this information in haplotype analyses of 19 kindreds with mutation 1 and 6 kindreds with mutation 2. All kindreds with mutation 1 showed a single allele for the intragenic marker D3S1611 that was not observed on any unaffected chromosome. They also shared portions of a haplotype of 4-15 markers encompassing 2.0-19.0 cM around MLH1. All kindreds with mutation 2 shared another allele for D3S1611 and a conserved haplotype of 5-14 markers spanning 2.0-15.0 cM around MLH1. The degree of haplotype conservation was used to estimate the ages of these two mutations. While some recessive disease genes have been estimated to have existed and spread for as long as thousands of generations worldwide and hundreds of generations in the Finnish population, our analyses suggest that the spread of mutation 1 started 16-43 generations (400-1,075 years) ago and that of mutation 2 some 5-21 generations (125-525 years) ago. These datings are compatible with our genealogical results identifying a common ancestor born in the 16th and 18th century, respectively. Overall, our results indicate that all Finnish kindreds studied to date showing either mutation 1 or mutation 2 are due to single ancestral founding mutations relatively recent in origin in the population. Alternatively, the mutations arose elsewhere earlier and were introduced in Finland more recently.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8940269 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-dependent variation of genotypes in MHC II transactivator gene (CIITA) in controls and association to type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119979
Source
Genes Immun. 2012 Dec;13(8):632-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
A. Gyllenberg
S. Asad
F. Piehl
M. Swanberg
L. Padyukov
B. Van Yserloo
E A Rutledge
B. McNeney
J. Graham
M. Orho-Melander
E. Lindholm
C. Graff
C. Forsell
K. Akesson
M. Landin-Olsson
A. Carlsson
G. Forsander
S A Ivarsson
H. Larsson
B. Lindblad
J. Ludvigsson
C. Marcus
A. Lernmark
L. Alfredsson
T. Olsson
I. Kockum
Author Affiliation
Neuroimmunology Unit, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Molecular Medicine, L8:05, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. alexandra.gyllenberg@ki.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2012 Dec;13(8):632-40
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lectins, C-Type - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Monosaccharide Transport Proteins - genetics
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Trans-Activators - genetics
Abstract
The major histocompatibility complex class II transactivator (CIITA) gene (16p13) has been reported to associate with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and myocardial infarction, recently also to celiac disease at genome-wide level. However, attempts to replicate association have been inconclusive. Previously, we have observed linkage to the CIITA region in Scandinavian type 1 diabetes (T1D) families. Here we analyze five Swedish T1D cohorts and a combined control material from previous studies of CIITA. We investigate how the genotype distribution within the CIITA gene varies depending on age, and the association to T1D. Unexpectedly, we find a significant difference in the genotype distribution for markers in CIITA (rs11074932, P=4 × 10(-5) and rs3087456, P=0.05) with respect to age, in the collected control material. This observation is replicated in an independent cohort material of about 2000 individuals (P=0.006, P=0.007). We also detect association to T1D for both markers, rs11074932 (P=0.004) and rs3087456 (P=0.001), after adjusting for age at sampling. The association remains independent of the adjacent T1D risk gene CLEC16A. Our results indicate an age-dependent variation in CIITA allele frequencies, a finding of relevance for the contrasting outcomes of previously published association studies.
PubMed ID
23052709 View in PubMed
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AHSG gene variant is associated with leanness among Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175447
Source
Hum Genet. 2005 Jun;117(1):54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Catharina Lavebratt
Sofia Wahlqvist
Louise Nordfors
Johan Hoffstedt
Peter Arner
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital L8:00, Stockholm, Sweden. catharina.lavebratt@cmm.ki.se
Source
Hum Genet. 2005 Jun;117(1):54-60
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Blood Proteins - genetics
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Genotype
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sweden
alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein
Abstract
Alpha(2) Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG) is a plasma protein inhibiting the activity of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Ahsg knock-out mice have increased insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that functional variants of the AHSG gene segregating in the human population would reflect variation in body mass index (BMI). We genotyped 356 overweight or obese (BMI: 37.2 [25.0-66.5] kg/m(2)) and 148 lean (BMI: 23.7 [23.4-24.9] kg/m(2)) otherwise healthy Swedish men for three non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within exon 6 (rs4917) and exon 7 (rs4918 and Arg299Cys) and one SNP in intron 1 (rs2593813) of the AHSG gene. The G/G genotype for rs2593813 was more common among lean than among obese and overweight individuals (odds ratio = 2.01, P = 0.009), whereas rs2593813 was in strong linkage disequilibrium (
D'
> or = 0.97) with rs4917 and rs4918. Homozygosity for the rs2593813:G-rs4917:Met-rs4918:Ser haplotype conferred an increased risk for leanness (odds ratio=1.90, P = 0.027). rs4917:Met and rs4918:Ser have previously been associated with lower AHSG protein level. A common variant of AHSG, previously associated with a lower AHSG protein level, is thus more common among lean than obese and overweight men, supporting the results from Ahsg knock-out mice, namely, that AHSG modulates body mass.
PubMed ID
15806395 View in PubMed
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