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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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A 6 year longitudinal study of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272785
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Maria Hagströmer
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Michael Sjöström
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2015 Sep;18(5):553-7
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate changes over six years in physical activity and sedentary behavior assessed with accelerometry in a representative sample of Swedish adults.
A longitudinal study over six years.
The cohort consisted of 1172 participants (46% males) in 2002 and 511 participants (46% males) in 2008, of which 478 (45% males) had valid data on both occasions. Mean (SD) age at baseline was 45 (15) years. To analyze changes over time, a mixed linear model for average intensity physical activity (counts/min) and time in sedentary behavior and light- and moderate- or higher-intensity physical activity was conducted, stratified for sex and age, and adjusted for BMI, education, self-rated health and ? wear time.
Over a six year period no significant changes were seen in the total cohort for average intensity and time in moderate- or higher intensity physical activity. A significant decrease in average intensity physical activity was found for men (p=0.006) and those aged 60+ years at baseline (p
PubMed ID
25277849 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of root filled teeth and periapical health amongst middle aged and elderly women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70741
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
F. Frisk
M. Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. fredrik.frisk@lio.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiography, Panoramic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Tooth, Nonvital - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To describe the endodontic status amongst middle-aged and elderly women longitudinally and cross-sectionally over 24 years. METHODOLOGY: A random sample of 1462 women 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years old, living in Göteborg, Sweden, were sampled in 1968 for medical and dental examinations with a participation rate of 90.1%. The same women were re-examined in 1980 and 1992 together with new 38- and 50-year-old women. The dental examination consisted of questionnaires, clinical and panoramic radiological survey (OPG). The number of teeth, number of root filled teeth (RF) and number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA) were registered. The RF and PA ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional data were analysed by means of anova and longitudinal data by a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample prevalences were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-squared test. In all analysis, the confidence interval (CI) regarded mean difference between groups (95% CI). RESULTS: The RF and PA ratio decreased over time as well as the frequency of edentulous subjects. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a minor increase in frequency of RF and PA and loss of teeth with age. Longitudinally, loss of teeth was evident in all cohorts. In addition, there was a trend of lower number of teeth with PA, and the RF ratio increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periapical disease did not increase with age, probably as a result of root canal treatment and extractions. Data showed that the prevalence of RF teeth and teeth with PA decreased for comparable age cohorts during the 24-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
15810975 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117634
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
P. Brøndum-Jacobsen
M. Benn
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Down-Regulation
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seasons
Time Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D has potential antithrombotic effects, suggesting that vitamin D analogs could be used as adjunctive antithrombotic agents. However, epidemiologic evidence of an association between reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and the risk of venous thromboembolism is lacking.
To test the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population.
We prospectively studied 18 791 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study. During up to 30 years of follow-up, 950 participants were diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were adjusted for seasonal variation.
The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism as a function of age increased with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (log-rank trend: P = 4 × 10(-4) ). On comparison of participants in the lowest and the highest tertile of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, the crude risk estimate in a model adjusted for age and sex was a 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-64%) increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The corresponding risk increase in a model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and cancer was 26% (95% CI 5-51%), and in a multivariable-adjusted model also including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use and lipid-lowering therapy it was 28% (95% CI 6-53%). Furthermore, corresponding risk increases with attempts to correct for regression dilution bias were 103% (95% CI 37-202%), 70% (95% CI 14-155%) and 73% (95% CI 15-160%) in the three models, respectively.
In these large general population studies, we observed a stepwise increasing risk of venous thromboembolism with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations.
PubMed ID
23279309 View in PubMed
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28-Joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137343
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Eva Hallert
Magnus Husberg
Thomas Skogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To explore possible association between disease activity at 3-month follow-up after RA diagnosis and costs over the following 4 years.
Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (= 1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates.
Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of = 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 = 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28
PubMed ID
21292734 View in PubMed
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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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ABCG2 polymorphism markedly affects the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150732
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Aug;86(2):197-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
J E Keskitalo
O. Zolk
M F Fromm
K J Kurkinen
P J Neuvonen
M. Niemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Aug;86(2):197-203
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - genetics
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - pharmacokinetics
Area Under Curve
Cross-Over Studies
Drug Resistance, Multiple
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Finland
Fluorobenzenes - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Genotype
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - pharmacokinetics
Linear Models
Male
Neoplasm Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pyrimidines - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Pyrroles - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Reference Values
Sulfonamides - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Abstract
The ABCG2 c.421C>A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was determined in 660 healthy Finnish volunteers, of whom 32 participated in a pharmacokinetic crossover study involving the administration of 20 mg atorvastatin and rosuvastatin. The frequency of the c.421A variant allele was 9.5% (95% confidence interval 8.1-11.3%). Subjects with the c.421AA genotype (n = 4) had a 72% larger mean area under the plasma atorvastatin concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) than individuals with the c.421CC genotype had (n = 16; P = 0.049). In participants with the c.421AA genotype, the rosuvastatin AUC(0-infinity) was 100% greater than in those with c.421CA (n = 12) and 144% greater than in those with the c.421CC genotype. Also, those with the c.421AA genotype showed peak plasma rosuvastatin concentrations 108% higher than those in the c.421CA genotype group and 131% higher than those in the c.421CC genotype group (P
PubMed ID
19474787 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic diameter is increased in males with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms: results from the Danish VIVA-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260407
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
T M M Joergensen
K. Houlind
A. Green
J S Lindholt
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between participants with male and female relatives with AAA.
Observational population-based cross-sectional study.
18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter.
Standardized ultrasound scan measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication.
From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative diagnosed with AAA, and 38 had AAA. Participants with a family history of AAA (+FH) had a significantly larger mean maximum aortic diameter (20.50 mm) compared with participants without family history of AAA (-FH) (19.07 mm, p
PubMed ID
25443525 View in PubMed
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Abductor Muscle Function and Trochanteric Tenderness After Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281385
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Aleksandra Hanas
Olof G Sköldenberg
Sebastian S Mukka
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - diagnosis - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Hemiarthroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - therapy
Prospective Studies
Psoas Muscles - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the abductor muscle function and trochanteric tenderness in patients operated with hemiarthroplasty using the direct lateral (DL) or posterolateral (PL) approach for displaced femoral neck fracture.
Prospective cohort study.
A secondary teaching hospital.
We enrolled 183 hips operated with hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fracture using the DL or PL approach.
Preoperatively, we evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). At 1 year postoperatively, lucid patients were clinically examined to evaluate the Trendelenburg sign, abductor muscle strength with a dynamometer, and trochanteric tenderness with an electronic algometer. The 1-year HHS and EQ-5D were documented.
The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative Trendelenburg sign, whereas the secondary outcomes included patients' reported limp, abductor muscle strength, trochanteric tenderness, HHS, and EQ-5D.
There were 48 patients (24 in the DL group and 24 in the PL group) who attended the 1-year clinical follow-up. The 2 groups were comparable (P > 0.05). The DL group showed a higher incidence of the Trendelenburg sign (9/24 vs. 1/24, P = 0.02) and limp (12/24 vs. 2/24, P = 0.004). Further analysis with logistic regression showed the surgical approach to be the only factor that resulted in the increment. No differences regarding HHS, EQ-5D, abductor muscle strength, algometer pressure pain threshold, and radiologic measurements were found (P > 0.05).
The incidence of the Trendelenburg sign and limp were significantly higher in the DL approach although this seemed not to influence abductor muscle strength or the incidence of trochanteric tenderness or compromise the clinical outcome.
Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
PubMed ID
27206260 View in PubMed
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2332 records – page 1 of 234.