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Decomposition of recalcitrant carbon under experimental warming in boreal forest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285643
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179674
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Adriana L Romero-Olivares
Steven D Allison
Kathleen K Treseder
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179674
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - metabolism
Forests
Global warming
Lignin - metabolism
Abstract
Over the long term, soil carbon (C) storage is partly determined by decomposition rate of carbon that is slow to decompose (i.e., recalcitrant C). According to thermodynamic theory, decomposition rates of recalcitrant C might differ from those of non-recalcitrant C in their sensitivities to global warming. We decomposed leaf litter in a warming experiment in Alaskan boreal forest, and measured mass loss of recalcitrant C (lignin) vs. non-recalcitrant C (cellulose, hemicellulose, and sugars) throughout 16 months. We found that these C fractions responded differently to warming. Specifically, after one year of decomposition, the ratio of recalcitrant C to non-recalcitrant C remaining in litter declined in the warmed plots compared to control. Consistent with this pattern, potential activities of enzymes targeting recalcitrant C increased with warming, relative to those targeting non-recalcitrant C. Even so, mass loss of individual C fractions showed that non-recalcitrant C is preferentially decomposed under control conditions whereas recalcitrant C losses remain unchanged between control and warmed plots. Moreover, overall mass loss was greater under control conditions. Our results imply that direct warming effects, as well as indirect warming effects (e.g. drying), may serve to maintain decomposition rates of recalcitrant C compared to non-recalcitrant C despite negative effects on overall decomposition.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28622366 View in PubMed
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[Effect of aromatic compounds and Mn2+ on the ligninolytic enzyme complex from the fungus Pleurotus floridae (FRIES) Kummer--a white-rot wood fungus]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10466
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1999 Jul-Aug;71(4):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
O M Dombrovs'ka
S S Kostyshyn
Author Affiliation
Yu. Fedkovich Chernivtsi State University, Ukraine.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1999 Jul-Aug;71(4):45-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzyl Alcohols - pharmacology
Carbohydrate Dehydrogenases - biosynthesis - metabolism
English Abstract
Enzyme Induction
Hydrolysis
Laccase
Lignin - metabolism
Manganese - pharmacology
Oxidoreductases - biosynthesis - metabolism
Peroxidases - biosynthesis - metabolism
Pleurotus - enzymology
Vanillic Acid - pharmacology
Abstract
The influence of aromatic compounds and Mn ions on activities of ligninolityc enzymes from white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridae has been studied. The specific inducers: vanillic acid and vanillyl alcohol--for activity of manganese-dependent peroxidase; vanillyl alcohol--for activity of cellobiose: quinone oxidoreductase during submerged, fermentation of Pleurotus floridae in Kirk's medium have been revealed. The inducers of laccase activity among studied aromatic compounds have not been revealed. The influence of Mn2+ in concentration range 0.4-68.4 mM on activities of ligninolytic enzymes of submerged culture of fungus P. floridae has been studied. Concentration of Mn ions 32.4 mM was optimal for manganese-dependent peroxidase activity.
PubMed ID
10791056 View in PubMed
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Effects of redox environment on hydrothermal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass under acidic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304539
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2021 Jan; 319:124211
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2021
Author
Dimitrios Ilanidis
Guochao Wu
Stefan Stagge
Carlos Martín
Leif J Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2021 Jan; 319:124211
Date
Jan-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomass
Hydrolysis
Lignin - metabolism
Norway
Oxidation-Reduction
Abstract
The effects of the redox environment on acidic hydrothermal pretreatment were investigated in experiments with sugarcane bagasse (190 °C, 14 min) and Norway spruce (205 °C, 5 min). To modulate the redox environment, pretreatment was performed without gas addition, with N2, or with O2. Analyses covered pretreated solids, pretreatment liquids, condensates, enzymatic digestibility, and inhibitory effects of pretreatment liquids on yeast. Addition of gas, especially O2, resulted in increased severity, as reflected by up to 18 percent units lower recoveries of pretreated solids, up to 31 percent units lower glucan recoveries, improved hemicellulose removal, formation of pseudo-lignin, improved overall glucan conversion, and increased concentrations of several microbial inhibitors. Some inhibitors, such as formaldehyde and coniferyl aldehyde, did not, however, follow that pattern. TAC (Total Aromatic Content) values reflected inhibitory effects of pretreatment liquids. This study demonstrates how gas addition can be used to modulate the severity of acidic hydrothermal pretreatment.
PubMed ID
33045548 View in PubMed
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Winter warming in Alaska accelerates lignin decomposition contributed by Proteobacteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305694
Source
Microbiome. 2020 06 05; 8(1):84
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
06-05-2020
Author
Xuanyu Tao
Jiajie Feng
Yunfeng Yang
Gangsheng Wang
Renmao Tian
Fenliang Fan
Daliang Ning
Colin T Bates
Lauren Hale
Mengting M Yuan
Linwei Wu
Qun Gao
Jiesi Lei
Edward A G Schuur
Julian Yu
Rosvel Bracho
Yiqi Luo
Konstantinos T Konstantinidis
Eric R Johnston
James R Cole
C Ryan Penton
James M Tiedje
Jizhong Zhou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 73019, USA.
Source
Microbiome. 2020 06 05; 8(1):84
Date
06-05-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Burkholderia - metabolism
Climate change
Hot Temperature
Lignin - metabolism
Permafrost
Proteobacteria - metabolism
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Abstract
In a warmer world, microbial decomposition of previously frozen organic carbon (C) is one of the most likely positive climate feedbacks of permafrost regions to the atmosphere. However, mechanistic understanding of microbial mediation on chemically recalcitrant C instability is limited; thus, it is crucial to identify and evaluate active decomposers of chemically recalcitrant C, which is essential for predicting C-cycle feedbacks and their relative strength of influence on climate change. Using stable isotope probing of the active layer of Arctic tundra soils after depleting soil labile C through a 975-day laboratory incubation, the identity of microbial decomposers of lignin and, their responses to warming were revealed.
The ß-Proteobacteria genus Burkholderia accounted for 95.1% of total abundance of potential lignin decomposers. Consistently, Burkholderia isolated from our tundra soils could grow with lignin as the sole C source. A 2.2?°C increase of warming considerably increased total abundance and functional capacities of all potential lignin decomposers. In addition to Burkholderia, a-Proteobacteria capable of lignin decomposition (e.g. Bradyrhizobium and Methylobacterium genera) were stimulated by warming by 82-fold. Those community changes collectively doubled the priming effect, i.e., decomposition of existing C after fresh C input to soil. Consequently, warming aggravates soil C instability, as verified by microbially enabled climate-C modeling.
Our findings are alarming, which demonstrate that accelerated C decomposition under warming conditions will make tundra soils a larger biospheric C source than anticipated. Video Abstract.
PubMed ID
32503635 View in PubMed
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