Skip header and navigation

Refine By

374 records – page 1 of 38.

20th International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time: biological mechanisms, recovery, and risk management in the 24-h society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124129
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2012 Jun;29(5):531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Göran Kecklund
Lee Di Milia
John Axelsson
Arne Lowden
Torbjörn Åkerstedt
Author Affiliation
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm Unversity, Stockholm, Sweden. goran.kecklund@stress.su.se
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2012 Jun;29(5):531-6
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Congresses as topic
Humans
Light - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Risk
Risk Management
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Work
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
This dedicated issue of Chronobiology International is devoted to the selected proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28 June to 1 July 2011. It constitutes the fifth such issue of the journal since 2004 dedicated to the selected proceedings to the meetings of the Working Time Society. The key theme of the 20th Symposium was "Biological Mechanisms, Recovery, and Risk Management in the 24-h Society." The collection of papers of this dedicated issue represents the best of contemporary research on the effects of night and rotating shift schedules on worker health and safety. The contents cover such topics as sleep restriction, injuries, health, and performance of night work and rotating shiftwork, plus light treatment as a countermeasure against the circadian disruption of shiftwork. The majority of the papers are observational field studies, including some of large sample size, and three studies are well-designed laboratory experiments.
PubMed ID
22621348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acclimation of Swedish and Italian ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to light intensity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292238
Source
Photosynth Res. 2017 Nov; 134(2):215-229
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Jared J Stewart
Stephanie K Polutchko
William W Adams
Barbara Demmig-Adams
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309-0334, USA.
Source
Photosynth Res. 2017 Nov; 134(2):215-229
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Arabidopsis - anatomy & histology - classification - physiology
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Italy
Light
Photosynthesis - physiology - radiation effects
Plant Leaves - anatomy & histology - physiology - radiation effects
Sweden
Abstract
This study addressed whether ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana from Sweden and Italy exhibited differences in foliar acclimation to high versus low growth light intensity, and compared CO2 uptake under growth conditions with light- and CO2-saturated intrinsic photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphological and vascular features. Differential responses between ecotypes occurred mainly at the scale of leaf architecture, with thicker leaves with higher intrinsic photosynthetic capacities and chlorophyll contents per leaf area, but no difference in photosynthetic capacity on a chlorophyll basis, in high light-grown leaves of the Swedish versus the Italian ecotype. Greater intrinsic photosynthetic capacity per leaf area in the Swedish ecotype was accompanied by a greater capacity of vascular infrastructure for sugar and water transport, but this was not associated with greater CO2 uptake rates under growth conditions. The Swedish ecotype with its thick leaves is thus constructed for high intrinsic photosynthetic and vascular flux capacity even under growth chamber conditions that may not permit full utilization of this potential. Conversely, the Swedish ecotype was less tolerant of low growth light intensity than the Italian ecotype, with smaller rosette areas and lesser aboveground biomass accumulation in low light-grown plants. Foliar vein density and stomatal density were both enhanced by high growth light intensity with no significant difference between ecotypes, and the ratio of water to sugar conduits was also similar between the two ecotypes during light acclimation. These findings add to the understanding of the foliar vasculature's role in plant photosynthetic acclimation and adaptation.
Notes
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2014 Sep;23 (17 ):4304-15 PMID 25039860
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2013 Apr 10;4:78 PMID 23596446
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2014 Sep;23(17):4291-303 PMID 25039363
Cites: Int J Mol Sci. 2013 Jun 18;14(6):12729-63 PMID 23778089
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2008 Apr;31(4):393-406 PMID 18182016
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(1):e30015 PMID 22276140
Cites: Ann Bot. 2006 Mar;97(3):443-52 PMID 16371443
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2014 Jan;27(1):193-9 PMID 24329869
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2014 Dec;152(4):763-72 PMID 24818515
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2012 Nov 20;3:255 PMID 23230444
Cites: J Plant Physiol. 2016 Sep 20;203:29-43 PMID 27185597
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2013 Jun 14;4:194 PMID 23785375
Cites: Photosynth Res. 2007 Nov-Dec;94(2-3):455-66 PMID 17211580
Cites: Plant J. 2015 Nov;84(4):682-93 PMID 26369909
Cites: New Phytol. 2013 Sep;199(4):1069-80 PMID 23721132
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2016 Jul;39(7):1549-58 PMID 26832121
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2009 Oct;32(10):1324-33 PMID 19453480
Cites: New Phytol. 2012 Jun;194(4):1112-22 PMID 22432639
Cites: Ann Bot. 2016 Feb;117(2):249-56 PMID 26637384
Cites: Photosynth Res. 1995 Nov;46(1-2):129-39 PMID 24301575
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2014 Sep;152(1):174-83 PMID 24450755
Cites: Plant Sci. 2016 Oct;251:12-22 PMID 27593459
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2015 Jul;115(1):73-82 PMID 26059971
Cites: J Exp Bot. 2013 Oct;64(13):3965-81 PMID 24123453
Cites: New Phytol. 2007;173(4):722-31 PMID 17286821
Cites: Nat Commun. 2012 May 15;3:837 PMID 22588299
Cites: Plant Cell Physiol. 2005 Sep;46(9):1525-39 PMID 16024910
Cites: New Phytol. 2010 Jan;185(2):481-92 PMID 19925555
Cites: Tree Physiol. 2000 Sep;20(15):1007-18 PMID 11305455
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2017 May;160(1):98-110 PMID 28074485
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2013 Jul 22;4:264 PMID 23898338
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2014 Feb 06;5:24 PMID 24567735
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2014 Sep;152(1):164-73 PMID 24450735
Cites: Planta. 2015 Dec;242(6):1277-90 PMID 26189001
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2015 Apr 09;6:167 PMID 25914696
Cites: Plant Mol Biol. 2004 Mar;54(5):767-81 PMID 15356394
Cites: Plant Physiol. 2010 Oct;154(2):571-7 PMID 20921187
Cites: BMC Plant Biol. 2012 Jan 11;12:6 PMID 22236032
Cites: Plant Physiol. 2005 Nov;139(3):1304-12 PMID 16244146
Cites: Photosynth Res. 2012 Sep;113(1-3):207-19 PMID 22791015
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Dec 24;110(52):21077-82 PMID 24324156
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Sep 6;102(36):12968-73 PMID 16120679
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2016 Jul 25;7:1026 PMID 27504111
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2016 Aug;25(15):3632-44 PMID 27247130
Cites: Front Plant Sci. 2013 Jul 05;4:240 PMID 23847643
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Jul 5;113(27):7590-5 PMID 27330113
Cites: Planta. 2004 Mar;218(5):793-802 PMID 14648116
Cites: Photosynth Res. 2012 Sep;113(1-3):181-9 PMID 22791016
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2012 Aug;35(8):1407-18 PMID 22339445
Cites: New Phytol. 2013 Jun;198(4):983-1000 PMID 23600478
Cites: Planta. 2000 Jun;211(1):105-11 PMID 10923710
Cites: Photosynth Res. 2012 Sep;113(1-3):75-88 PMID 22790560
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2015 Jul;38(7):1321-32 PMID 25388923
Cites: Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2017 Jun;37:34-41 PMID 28410523
Cites: Am J Bot. 2006 Oct;93(10):1490-500 PMID 21642096
Cites: New Phytol. 2008;180(1):90-9 PMID 18631290
Cites: Evolution. 2017 Mar;71(3):550-564 PMID 27859214
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2015 Feb;24(4):785-97 PMID 25640699
Cites: New Phytol. 2013 Mar;197(4):1321-31 PMID 23311994
PubMed ID
28861679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of astaxanthin by a new Haematococcus pluvialis strain BM1 from the white sea coastal rocks (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261314
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Konstantin Chekanov
Elena Lobakova
Irina Selyakh
Larisa Semenova
Roman Sidorov
Alexei Solovchenko
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotenoids - metabolism
Chlorophyta - metabolism
Cytoplasm - metabolism
Ecosystem
Environment
Light
Lipids
Nitrogen - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Russia
Salinity
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Temperature
Xanthophylls - metabolism
Abstract
We report on a novel arctic strain BM1 of a carotenogenic chlorophyte from a coastal habitat with harsh environmental conditions (wide variations in solar irradiance, temperature, salinity and nutrient availability) identified as Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow. Increased (25‰) salinity exerted no adverse effect on the growth of the green BM1 cells. Under stressful conditions (high light, nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation), green vegetative cells of H. pluvialis BM1 grown in BG11 medium formed non-motile palmelloid cells and, eventually, hematocysts capable of a massive accumulation of the keto-carotenoid astaxanthin with a high nutraceutical and therapeutic potential. Routinely, astaxanthin was accumulated at the level of 4% of the cell dry weight (DW), reaching, under prolonged stress, 5.5% DW. Astaxanthin was predominantly accumulated in the form of mono- and diesters of fatty acids from C16 and C18 families. The palmelloids and hematocysts were characterized by the formation of red-colored cytoplasmic lipid droplets, increasingly large in size and number. The lipid droplets tended to merge and occupied almost the entire volume of the cell at the advanced stages of stress-induced carotenogenesis. The potential application of the new strain for the production of astaxanthin is discussed in comparison with the H. pluvialis strains currently employed in microalgal biotechnology.
Notes
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1987 Jul;4(4):406-253447015
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1997 Jul;14(7):685-959254330
Cites: J Biol Chem. 1957 May;226(1):497-50913428781
Cites: J Cell Biol. 1963 Apr;17:208-1213986422
Cites: Plant Physiol. 2005 May;138(1):490-51515849308
Cites: J Mol Evol. 1985;22(2):160-743934395
Cites: Histochem J. 1979 May;11(3):299-31037195
Cites: Bioresour Technol. 2010 Jun;101(11):3801-720117928
Cites: BMC Evol Biol. 2010;10:820067610
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Nov 1;23(21):2947-817846036
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2006;7:43917032440
Cites: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2007 Apr;74(6):1163-7417277962
Cites: Photosynth Res. 2010 Nov;106(1-2):155-7720706789
Cites: Syst Biol. 2010 May;59(3):307-2120525638
Cites: J Chem Soc Perkin 1. 1975;(21):2195-2204415
Cites: Bacteriol Rev. 1971 Jun;35(2):171-2054998365
Cites: Trends Biotechnol. 2003 May;21(5):210-612727382
Cites: Trends Biotechnol. 2000 Apr;18(4):160-710740262
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2012 Feb;88(2):189-9622062087
PubMed ID
25196836 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of glutathione-S-transferase in the blood plasma, liver and crystalline lens tissues as affected by low doses of ionizing radiation and polychromatic light]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51029
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1997 May-Jun;69(3):54-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N F Leus
S G Kolomiichuk
V B Lishchenko
Author Affiliation
V.P. Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Odessa.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1997 May-Jun;69(3):54-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
English Abstract
Glutathione Transferase - blood - metabolism - radiation effects
Lens, Crystalline - enzymology - radiation effects
Light
Liver - enzymology - radiation effects
Male
Rabbits
Abstract
The developmental dynamics of pathologic changes in the lenses and activity of glutathione-S-transferase in the blood plasma, liver and lens tissues of rabbits under chronic influence (2 months) of small doses of X-ray radiation (total dose 2 Gy) and polychromatic light have been researched. It was shown, that polychromatic light and X-ray irradiation of rabbits significantly affected the lens nativity and increased the developmental frequency and the intensity of lens opacities. It was determined, that activity of glutathione-S-transferase in blood plasma increased for 1 month after the beginning of X-ray effects. The same effect on the enzymatic activity was shown by the summary influence of polychromatic light and X-ray irradiation. Glutathione-S-transferase activity decreased during 2 months as compared with the initial values, before irradiation of the animals. The enzymatic activity was increased in rabbit-liver cytoplasm by X-ray irradiation in 2 months. A decrease of glutathione-S-transferase activity in the liver, cortex and lens nucleus was determined under the influence of both X-ray radiation and polychromatic light.
PubMed ID
9505362 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective responses to changes in day length in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45723
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brian J Prendergast
Randy J Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. prendergast@uchicago.edu
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anxiety - psychology
Attention - physiology
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Cricetinae
Depression - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Exploratory Behavior - physiology
Female
Light
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Phodopus
Photoperiod
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smell - physiology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Swimming - psychology
Abstract
The goal of these experiments was to test the hypothesis that day length influences anxious- and depressive-like behaviors in reproductively photoperiodic rodents. Male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were exposed to long (16 h light/day; LD) or short (8 h light/day; SD) photoperiods beginning at the time of weaning (day 18). Two weeks later hamsters were subjected to a series of behavioral tests to quantify anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. In an elevated plus maze, SD males exhibited longer latencies to enter an open arm, entered fewer open arms, and spent less time exploring open arms relative to LD hamsters. SD males were likewise slower to enter either of the distal arms of a completely enclosed T-maze, and in a hunger-motivated exploratory paradigm SD males were slower to enter an open arena for food as compared to LD males. In a forced-swimming model of behavioral despair, SD males exhibited immobility sooner, more often, and for a greater total amount of time relative to LD males. Total activity levels, aversiveness to light, olfactory function, and limb strength were unaffected by SD, suggesting that the behavioral changes consequent to SD are not attributable to sensory or motor deficits, but rather may arise from changes in general affective state. The anxiogenic and depressive effects of SD were largely absent in female hamsters. Together the results indicate that adaptation to short photoperiods is associated with increased expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors relative to those observed under LD photoperiod conditions.
PubMed ID
15721056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related changes in the transmission properties of the human lens and their relevance to circadian entrainment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98067
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Feb;36(2):308-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Line Kessel
Jesper Holm Lundeman
Kristina Herbst
Thomas Vestergaard Andersen
Michael Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Nordre Ringvej 57, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. linkes01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Feb;36(2):308-12
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Humans
Lens, Crystalline - physiology - radiation effects
Light
Middle Aged
Photoperiod
Rod Opsins - metabolism
Spectrum Analysis
Tissue Donors
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: To characterize age-related changes in the transmission of light through noncataractous human lenses. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. METHODS: The spectral transmission of white light was measured along the visual axis in the most central part of the lens in vitro in intact human donor lenses over a wide range of ages. RESULTS: The study evaluated 28 intact human donor lenses of 15 donors aged 18 to 76 years. Increasing age was associated with gradually decreasing transmission at all visible wavelengths, most prominently at shorter wavelengths. Empirical formulas describing the age-related loss of transmission were created for each spectral color. At 480 nm, the absorption peak for melanopsin, transmission decreased by 72% from the age of 10 years to the age of 80 years. CONCLUSION: The age-related decrease in spectral transmission through the human lens could be modeled by a simple algorithm that may be useful in the design of intraocular lenses that mimic the characteristics of the human lens and in studies of color vision, psychophysics, and melanopsin activation.
PubMed ID
20152615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in chlorophyll a/b binding proteins in Solanaceae cybrids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69077
Source
Mol Gen Genet. 1995 Dec 20;249(6):648-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-1995
Author
E. Babiychuk
R. Schantz
N. Cherep
J H Weil
Y. Gleba
S. Kushnir
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Mol Gen Genet. 1995 Dec 20;249(6):648-54
Date
Dec-20-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Carrier Proteins - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Cell Compartmentation
Cell Nucleus - genetics
Chimera
Chloroplasts - genetics
Gene Expression
Genes, Plant
Hybrid Cells
Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes
Molecular Sequence Data
Multigene Family
Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Photosystem II Protein Complex
Plant Proteins
Plants - genetics
Plants, Toxic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Tobacco - genetics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
In this study we have constructed a number of plants (cybrids), in which the nuclear genome of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia is combined with the plastome of Atropa belladonna, or the nuclear genome of N. tabacum with plastomes of Lycium barbarum, Scopolia carniolica, Physochlaine officinalis or Nolana paradoxa. Our biochemical and immunological analyses prove that in these cybrids the biogenesis of the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins (CAB) of the light harvesting complex II (LHCII) is altered. Besides normal sized CAB polypeptides of 27, 25.5 and 25 kDa, which become less abundant, the cybrids analyzed have additional polypeptides of 26, 24.5 and 24 kDa. Direct protein micro-sequencing showed that at least two truncated 26 kDa CAB polypeptides in plant cells containing a nucleus of N. plumbaginifolia and plastids of A. belladonna are encoded by the type 1 Lhcb genes. These polypeptides are 11-12 amino acids shorter at the N-terminus than the expected size. Based on the available data we conclude that the biogenesis of the LHCII in vivo may depend on plastome-encoded factor(s). These results suggest that plastome-encoded factors that cause specific protein degradation and/or abnormal processing might determine compartmental genetic incompatibility in plants.
PubMed ID
8544830 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternating light-darkness-influenced human electrocardiographic magnetoreception in association with geomagnetic pulsations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6054
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 2001;55 Suppl 1:63s-75s
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Otsuka
S. Oinuma
G. Cornélissen
A. Weydahl
Y. Ichimaru
M. Kobayashi
S. Yano
B. Holmeslet
T L Hansen
G. Mitsutake
M J Engebretson
O. Schwartzkopff
F. Halberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, Daini Hospital, Nishiogu, Japan. frtotk99@ba2.so-net.ne.jp
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 2001;55 Suppl 1:63s-75s
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Cardiovascular Physiology - radiation effects
Darkness
Electrocardiography - radiation effects
Electromagnetic fields
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Light
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Abstract
Geomagnetic variations of partly interplanetary origin, with cyclic signatures in human affairs and pathology include the incidence of various diseases, regarding which this study of healthy subjects attempted to determine an underlying mechanism by worldwide archival and physiological monitoring, notably of heart rate variability (HRV). In the past half-century, the possible health and other hazards of natural, solar variability-driven temporal variations in the earth's magnetic field have become a controversial subject in view of the inconsistent results. Some well-documented claims of associations between geomagnetic storms and myocardial infarction or stroke have been rejected by a study based on more comprehensive data analyzed by rigorous methods - covering, however, only part of a solar cycle in only part of a hemisphere. It seems possible that inter-solar cycle and geographic variability, if not geographic differences, may account for discrepancies. Herein, we examine the start of a planetary study on any influence of geomagnetic disturbances that are most pronounced in the auroral oval, on human HRV. The magnetic field variations exhibit complex spectra and include the frequency band between 0.001-10 Hz, which is regarded as ultra-low frequency by physicists. Since the 'ultra-low-frequency' range, like other endpoints used in cardiology, refers to much higher frequencies than the about-yearly changes that are here shown to play a role in environmental-organismic interactions revealed by HRV, the current designations used in cardiology are all placed in quotation marks to indicate the need for possible revision. Whether or not this suggestion has an immediate response, we have pointed to a need for the development of instrumentation and software that renders the assessment of circadian, infradian and even infra-annual (truly low frequency) modulations routinely feasible. HRV was examined on the basis of nearly continuous 7-day records by ECG between December 10, 1998, and November 2, 2000, on 19 clinically healthy subjects, 21 to 54 years of age, in Alta, Norway. A geomagnetic record was obtained from the Auroral Observatory of the University of Tromsø. First, frequency-domain measures of HRV were compared for each person in 24-hour spans of high geomagnetic disturbance versus quiet conditions. Second, cross-spectra between geomagnetic activity and HRV measures were quantified via the squared coherence spectrum using 7-day time series. A 7.5% increase in the 24-hour average of heart rate, HR (P = 0.00020) and a decrease in HRV were documented on days of high geomagnetic disturbance. The decrease in HRV was validated statistically for the 'total frequency', 'TF' endpoint (18.6% decrease, P= 0.00009). The decrease in spectral power was found primarily in the 'circaminutan frequency', 'VLF' (21.9% decrease, P
PubMed ID
11774870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambient temperature effects on photo induced gonadal cycles and hormonal secretion patterns in Great Tits from three different breeding latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95553
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Silverin Bengt
Wingfield John
Stokkan Karl-Arne
Massa Renato
Järvinen Antero
Andersson Nils-Ake
Lambrechts Marcel
Sorace Alberto
Blomqvist Donald
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, University of Göteborg, Sweden. bengt.silverin@zool.gu.se
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Geography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood - secretion
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Light
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Passeriformes - blood - metabolism - physiology
Photoperiod
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Temperature
Testis - anatomy & histology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
The present study determines how populations of Great Tits (Parus major) breeding in southern, mid and northern European latitudes have adjusted their reproductive endocrinology to differences in the ambient temperature during the gonadal cycle. A study based on long-term breeding data, using the Colwell predictability model, showed that the start of the breeding season has a high predictability ( approximately 0.8-0.9) at all latitudes, and that the environmental information factor (I(e)) progressively decreased from mid Italy (I(e)>4) to northern Finland (I(e)
PubMed ID
18402961 View in PubMed
Less detail

374 records – page 1 of 38.