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1045 records – page 1 of 105.

11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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Abstention from smoking extends life and compresses morbidity: a population based study of health expectancy among smokers and never smokers in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67416
Source
Tob Control. 2001 Sep;10(3):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
H. Brønnum-Hansen
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@niph.dk
Source
Tob Control. 2001 Sep;10(3):273-8
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Interviews
Life expectancy
Life tables
Male
Population Surveillance
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate health expectancy--that is, the average lifetime in good health--among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers in Denmark. DESIGN: A method suggested by Peto and colleagues in 1992 for estimating smoking attributable mortality rates was used to construct a life table for never smokers. This life table and relative risks for death for ex-smokers and smokers versus never smokers were used to estimate life tables for ex-smokers and smokers. Life tables and prevalence rates of health status were combined and health expectancy was calculated by Sullivan's method. SETTING: The Danish adult population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The expected lifetime in self rated good health or without longstanding illness for never smokers and smokers. RESULTS: The expected lifetime of a 20 year old man who will never begin to smoke is 56.7 years, 48.7 (95% confidence interval (CI), 46.8 to 50.7) years of which are expected to be in self rated good health. The corresponding figures for a man who smokes heavily are 49.5 years, 36.5 (95% CI 35.0 to 38.1 ) years of which are in self rated good health. A 20 year old woman who will never begin to smoke can expect to live a further 60.9 years, with 46.4 (95% CI 44.9 to 47.8) years in self rated good health; if she is a lifelong heavy smoker, her expected lifetime is reduced to 53.8 years, 33.8 (95% CI 31.7 to 35.9) years of which are in self rated good health. Health expectancy based on long standing illness is reduced for smokers when compared with never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking reduces the expected lifetime in good health and increases the expected lifetime in poor health.
PubMed ID
11544393 View in PubMed
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Access to care, health status, and health disparities in the United States and Canada: results of a cross-national population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169088
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Karen E Lasser
David U Himmelstein
Steffie Woolhandler
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass, USA. klasser@challiance.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - utilization
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs - economics - standards - utilization
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage
Abstract
We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of medical services in the United States and Canada and compared disparities according to race, income, and immigrant status.
We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we used logistic regression to analyze country as a predictor of access to care, quality of care, and satisfaction with care and as a predictor of disparities in these measures.
In multivariate analyses, US respondents (compared with Canadians) were less likely to have a regular doctor, more likely to have unmet health needs, and more likely to forgo needed medicines. Disparities on the basis of race, income, and immigrant status were present in both countries but were more extreme in the United States.
United States residents are less able to access care than are Canadians. Universal coverage appears to reduce most disparities in access to care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16735628 View in PubMed
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[Accidents and accident mortality in Denmark--a comparison with Scandinavia and Europe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11630
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T B Hansen
N D Röck
A. Poulstrup
S. Sabroe
J. Steensberg
B. Netterstrøm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afd 0 og Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Universitets Hospital.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Date
1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
As the development in mean age of the population and life expectancy has been less favourable in Denmark than in the rest of Western Europe, the Ministry of Health decided to investigate statistics for the period, 1972-1990, for the main areas where Danish life expectancy was poorer. A sharp increase in the incidence of accidental poisoning with medical drugs and alcohol during the period was found to be a factor contributing to the poorer Danish statistics during the period. In the subcategory, death after a fall, there was an increase in incidence among the elderly, but the loss of life-years remained constant. The subcategory, fatal road accidents, manifested a marked reduction in incidence, despite the increase in traffic density during the period, and there was a reduction in the loss of life-years. Thus, in the category, accidental deaths, the increase in the incidence of accidental poisonings would appear to be the only factor contributing to the poorer development in mean age and life expectancy in Denmark.
PubMed ID
7937021 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of life tables in predicting overall survival in candidates for radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164042
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Sep 1;69(1):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2007
Author
Jochen Walz
Andrea Gallina
Georg Hutterer
Paul Perrotte
Shahrokh F Shariat
Markus Graefen
Michael McCormack
Francois Bénard
Luc Valiquette
Fred Saad
Pierre I Karakiewicz
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Sep 1;69(1):88-94
Date
Sep-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Humans
Life expectancy
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - radiotherapy
Quebec
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To test the accuracy of life tables (LTs) in predicting survival in men treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.
We selected the records of 3,176 patients treated with radiotherapy and who had no clinical evidence of disease relapse. Life table-derived life expectancy (LE) was defined for every individual using a population-specific LT. Age, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), and LT-derived LE were then used as predictors of overall mortality in Cox regression models. Predictive accuracy (PA) was estimated with the Harrell's concordance index and was internally validated with 200 bootstrap resamples.
The actuarial median survival was 4.7 years (mean, 6.4 years). At radiotherapy, median age was 70.6 years, median CCI was 2, and median LT-derived LE was 12 years. All variables were statistically significant predictors of overall mortality (all p values
PubMed ID
17446004 View in PubMed
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Addressing health inequalities in the US: a life course health development approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128306
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Mar;74(5):671-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Neal Halfon
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Healthier Children Families and Communities, United States. nhalfon@ucla.edu
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Mar;74(5):671-3
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22209674 View in PubMed
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Adolescent experience predicts longevity: evidence from historical epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260065
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A. Falconi
A. Gemmill
R E Dahl
R. Catalano
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
France - epidemiology
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longevity - physiology
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human development reportedly includes critical and sensitive periods during which environmental stressors can affect traits that persist throughout life. Controversy remains over which of these periods provides an opportunity for such stressors to affect health and longevity. The elaboration of reproductive biology and its behavioral sequelae during adolescence suggests such a sensitive period, particularly among males. We test the hypothesis that life expectancy at age 20 among males exposed to life-threatening stressors during early adolescence will fall below that among other males. We apply time-series methods to cohort mortality data in France between 1816 and 1919, England and Wales between 1841 and 1919, and Sweden between 1861 and 1919. Our results indicate an inverse association between cohort death rates at ages 10-14 and cohort life expectancy at age 20. Our findings imply that better-informed and more strategic management of the stressors encountered by early adolescents may improve population health.
PubMed ID
24901655 View in PubMed
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Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
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Adult height and risk of ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and premature death: a population based 36-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105680
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Morten Schmidt
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Pedersen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200, Aarhus, Denmark, morten.schmidt@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality, Premature
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have associated height with cardiovascular diseases other than myocardial infarction. We conducted a population-based 36-year cohort study of 12,859 men born in 1955 or 1965 whose fitness for military service was assessed by Draft Boards in Northern Denmark. Hospital diagnoses for ischemic heart diseases, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and venous thromboembolism were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, covering all Danish hospitals since 1977. Mortality data were obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System. We began follow-up on the 22nd birthday of each subject and continued until occurrence of an outcome, emigration, death, or 31 December 2012, whichever came first. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Compared with short stature, the education-adjusted HR among tall men was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.54-0.84) for ischemic heart disease (similar for myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and heart failure), 1.60 (95 % CI 1.11-2.33) for atrial fibrillation, 1.05 (95 % CI 0.75-1.46) for stroke, 1.04 (95 % CI 0.67-1.64) for venous thromboembolism, and 0.70 (95 % CI 0.58-0.86) for death. In conclusion, short stature was a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and premature death, but a protective factor for atrial fibrillation. Stature was not substantially associated with stroke or venous thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
24337942 View in PubMed
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1045 records – page 1 of 105.