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69 records – page 1 of 7.

Alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203376
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L. Feldman
B. Harvey
P. Holowaty
L. Shortt
Author Affiliation
East York Health Unit, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Parents
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To identify specific alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among local high school students; to determine whether relationships exist between alcohol use and various sociodemographic and lifestyle behaviors; and to assist in the development and implementation of alcohol abuse prevention programs.
This cross-sectional study involved the completion of a questionnaire by 1236 Grade 9-13 students (86% response rate) from 62 randomly selected classrooms in three Canadian urban schools. Data analyzed here are part of a larger lifestyle survey.
A total of 24% of students reported never having tasted alcohol, 22% have tasted alcohol but do not currently drink, 39% are current moderate drinkers, 11% are current heavy drinkers (five or more drinks on one occasion at least once a month), and 5% did not answer. Reasons stated most often for not drinking were "bad for health" and "upbringing," while reasons stated most often for drinking were "enjoy it" and "to get in a party mood." Student drinking patterns were significantly related to gender, ethnicity, grade, and the reported drinking habits of parents and friends. Older male adolescents who describe their ethnicity as Canadian are at higher risk for heavy drinking than students who are younger or female, or identify their ethnicity as European or Asian. Current heavy drinkers are at higher risk than other students for engaging in other high-risk behaviors such as drinking and driving, being a passenger in a car when the driver is intoxicated, and daily smoking.
Heavy alcohol use in adolescents remains an important community health concern. Older self-described Canadian and Canadian-born male adolescents are at higher risk for heavy drinking. Current and heavy drinking rises significantly between Grades 9 and 12. Students who drink heavily are more likely to drink and drive, to smoke daily, and to have friends and parents who drink alcohol.
PubMed ID
9890365 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the physical activity and health status of British Columbian Aboriginal populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127732
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Feb;37(1):127-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Heather J A Foulds
Shannon S D Bredin
Darren E R Warburton
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Feb;37(1):127-37
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Life Style - ethnology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Obesity - diagnosis - ethnology
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - ethnology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal people have experienced elevated rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic conditions that are disproportionate to the general Canadian population. We sampled British Columbian Aboriginal populations to determine the current health status of this population. A total of 882 Aboriginal adults =16 years of age from 25 locations around the province were sampled from 2007-2011. Health measurements evaluated included body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking behaviours, and resting blood pressure as well as histories of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. Nonfasting measures of blood sugar, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were also recorded. We used logistical regression to quantify variations in diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors with age, gender, geographic location, on- and off-reserve and urban-rural areas of residence, smoking, and physical activity behaviour. The prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and high total cholesterol were found to be greater among males, while females experienced greater rates of abdominal obesity and physical inactivity. Rates of chronic conditions were similar across on- and off-reserve, urban-rural areas, and geographic region residences, though rural, on-reserve, and northern residents experienced greater risk of poor health status. Larger proportions of on-reserve, rural, and interior individuals were found to be more physically inactive. Aboriginal populations still experience substantially poorer health status in comparison with the general population. Initiatives to improve the health of this population are urgently needed addressing all sectors of the Aboriginal population, all geographic regions, and all areas of residence, with special emphasis on rural, on-reserve, and northern populations.
PubMed ID
22269025 View in PubMed
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Assessing dietary intake in a population undergoing a rapid transition in diet and lifestyle: the Arctic Inuit in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147869
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Sangita Sharma
Xia Cao
Cindy Roache
Annie Buchan
Rhonda Reid
Joel Gittelsohn
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. sangita_sharma@unc.edu
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Competency
Diet - ethnology - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to (1) characterise the diets of adult Inuit; (2) highlight foods for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme; (3) develop a quantitative FFQ (QFFQ) to evaluate the programme and monitor changes in dietary intake in this population over time. A dietary survey using single 24-h dietary recalls was conducted among Inuit aged between 19 and 87 years in two communities in Nunavut, Canada. Eighty-seven subjects completed the recalls (response rate was approximately 73 %). The mean energy intake for men and women was 9530 and 6939 kJ, respectively. The intakes of dietary fibre and the majority of vitamins and minerals (especially vitamins A, D, and E, total folate and Ca) were far below the recommendations. Traditional foods contributed 40 and 42 %, respectively, to protein and Fe intakes. Non-nutrient-dense store-bought foods were consumed much more frequently than the nutrient-dense traditional foods. Foods high in fat and sugar were highlighted, and will be replaced by healthier, more nutrient-dense alternatives to address the dietary inadequacies for the nutritional intervention programme. A 154-item QFFQ was developed and pilot tested in the Arctic Inuit. The present study highlighted foods to be targeted for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme not previously undertaken in this population. This QFFQ is culturally appropriate and specific for evaluating the effectiveness of the programme, as well as monitoring nutritional transition in this population.
PubMed ID
19840421 View in PubMed
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Association between sucrose intake and acute coronary event risk and effect modification by lifestyle factors: Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282792
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
K. Warfa
I. Drake
P. Wallström
G. Engström
E. Sonestedt
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Incidence
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - ethnology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is positively associated with the risk of a coronary event. However, a few studies have examined the association between sucrose (the most common extrinsic sugar in Sweden) and incident coronary events. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between sucrose intake and coronary event risk and to determine whether these associations are specific to certain subgroups of the population (i.e. according to physical activity, obesity status, educational level, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, intake of fat and intake of fruits and vegetables). We performed a prospective analysis on 26 190 individuals (62 % women) free from diabetes and without a history of CVD from the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Over an average of 17 years of follow-up (457 131 person-years), 2493 incident cases of coronary events were identified. Sucrose intake was obtained from an interview-based diet history method, including 7-d records of prepared meals and cold beverages and a 168-item diet questionnaire covering other foods. Participants who consumed >15 % of their energy intake (E%) from sucrose showed a 37 (95 % CI 13, 66) % increased risk of a coronary event compared with the lowest sucrose consumers (
PubMed ID
27774913 View in PubMed
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Assumptions about culture in discourse on ethnic minority health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117694
Source
Commun Med. 2013;10(2):141-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kirsten Jaeger
Source
Commun Med. 2013;10(2):141-51
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Culture
Denmark
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Communication
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Minority Health - ethnology
Politics
Abstract
This paper is interested in the way the concept of culture is deployed in documents aimed at investigating, informing on and promoting aspects of ethnic minority health. Within a health-political discourse focusing increasingly on individual lifestyles, ethnic minority health became subject to increased political and professional interest in the last decades of the twentieth and the first decade of the twenty-first century. Analysis of the discourse on ethnic minority health emerging in five texts addressing health professionals shows that the culture of ethnic minority citizens is primarily seen as contributing to low levels of knowledge about health and to adverse health behavior. Thus, the texts present cultural beliefs and practices as contributing to the high prevalence of lifestyle diseases among ethnic minority population groups. The analysis, however, demonstrates that a more nuanced discourse is evolving, taking the complexity of the culture concept into account. In accordance with Danish health-political priorities, the most recent text analyzed in this study promotes an individualistic approach to both ethnic minority and Danish ethnic majority citizens.
PubMed ID
24851509 View in PubMed
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Basal metabolic rate in the Yakut (Sakha) of Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6646
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2005 Mar-Apr;17(2):155-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
J Josh Snodgrass
William R Leonard
Larissa A Tarskaia
Vasili P Alekseev
Vadim G Krivoshapkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. j-snodgrass@northwestern.edu
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2005 Mar-Apr;17(2):155-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Human indigenous circumpolar populations have elevated basal metabolic rates (BMRs) relative to predicted values; this metabolic elevation has been postulated to be a physiological adaptation to chronic and severe cold stress. The present study examines BMR in the Yakut, an indigenous high-latitude population from the Sakha Republic of Russia to determine (1) whether the Yakut show evidence of an elevated BMR, (2) if the Yakut display evidence of age-related changes in BMR, and (3) whether lifestyle differences influence BMR. BMR was measured during the late summer in 75 women and 50 men (ages 18-56 years) from the Siberian village of Berdygestiakh. Measured BMR (+/- SEM) of the entire sample was significantly elevated (+6.5%) compared to predictions based on body mass (6,623.7 +/- 94.9 vs. 6,218.2 +/- 84.7 kJ/day; P
PubMed ID
15736182 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in the reindeer breeding Saami population of Sweden, 1961-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18934
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(10):969-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Hassle
P. Sjölander
M. Barnekow-Bergkvist
A. Kadesjö
Author Affiliation
Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(10):969-76
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Animals
Breeding
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Registries
Reindeer
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Saami people are the natives of northern Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula. In a cohort of 2033 Swedish reindeer breeding Saamis, the cancer risks between 1961 and 1997 were studied. In total, 193 cases of cancer were observed versus 322 expected in the general Swedish population and 249 in a geographically matched reference population of non-Saamis. In comparison to non-Saamis living in the same area, the reindeer breeding Saamis showed a statistically significant lower risk of developing cancer of the prostate and of malignant lymphoma, whereas the risk of stomach cancer was significantly higher. Although there were no statistically significant changes of cancer risks over time, temporal trends were indicated towards a decreased risk of cancer in the stomach and the prostate. The results suggest that the explanations of the low cancer risk of the reindeer breeding Saamis, in relation to the non-Saamis in the same environment, are to be found among lifestyle and/or genetic factors.
PubMed ID
12188018 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in Swedish Lapps who breed reindeer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25057
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Dec;132(6):1078-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
K. Wiklund
L E Holm
G. Eklund
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Cancer Epidemiology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Inst. and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Dec;132(6):1078-82
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Breeding
Cohort Studies
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Reindeer
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer risks during the period 1961-1984 were studied in a cohort of 2,034 Swedish reindeer-breeding Lapps, a unique group whose culture and life-style differ considerably from those in the rest of the Swedish population. A total of 100 cases of cancer were observed versus 163 expected. Statistically significantly decreased risks were found for cancers of the colon, respiratory organs, female breast, male genital organs, and kidneys, and for malignant lymphomas. The stomach was the only site with a significantly increased risk. Reindeer-breeding Lapps have ingested fallout products via the lichen-reindeer-man food chain since the 1950s. However, no increased risk was found for the cancer sites considered to be most sensitive to radiation.
PubMed ID
2260539 View in PubMed
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Caring for Strangers: Aging, Traditional Medicine, and Collective Self-care in Post-socialist Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285279
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2017 Mar;31(1):78-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Tatiana Chudakova
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2017 Mar;31(1):78-96
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - ethnology
Anthropology, Medical
Caregivers
Empathy
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Russia - ethnology
Self Care
Abstract
This article explores how aging patients in Russia assemble strategies of care in the face of commercialization of medical services and public health discourses and initiatives aimed at improving the population's lifestyle habits. By focusing on how the formation of pensioner publics intersects with the health-seeking trajectories of elderly patients, it tracks an emerging ethic of collective self-care-a form of therapeutic collectivity that challenges articulations of good health as primarily an extension of personal responsibility or solely as a corollary of access to medical resources. By drawing on traditional medicine, these pensioners rely on and advocate for stranger intimacies that offer tactics for survival in the present through the care of (and for) a shared and embodied post-socialist condition of social, economic, and bodily precarity.
PubMed ID
26756584 View in PubMed
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69 records – page 1 of 7.