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172 records – page 1 of 18.

Adolescent experience predicts longevity: evidence from historical epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260065
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A. Falconi
A. Gemmill
R E Dahl
R. Catalano
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
France - epidemiology
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longevity - physiology
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human development reportedly includes critical and sensitive periods during which environmental stressors can affect traits that persist throughout life. Controversy remains over which of these periods provides an opportunity for such stressors to affect health and longevity. The elaboration of reproductive biology and its behavioral sequelae during adolescence suggests such a sensitive period, particularly among males. We test the hypothesis that life expectancy at age 20 among males exposed to life-threatening stressors during early adolescence will fall below that among other males. We apply time-series methods to cohort mortality data in France between 1816 and 1919, England and Wales between 1841 and 1919, and Sweden between 1861 and 1919. Our results indicate an inverse association between cohort death rates at ages 10-14 and cohort life expectancy at age 20. Our findings imply that better-informed and more strategic management of the stressors encountered by early adolescents may improve population health.
PubMed ID
24901655 View in PubMed
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Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
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[Aging of population in Russia and Ukraine: look into the future]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87424
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(2):14-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Pirozhkov S I
Safarova G L
Shcherbov S Ia
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2007;20(2):14-22
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Russia
Ukraine
Abstract
The paper aims at comparative analysis of future trends of population ageing in Russia and Ukraine. The UN Population Prospects (The 2004 Revision) and probabilistic projections for Russia and Ukraine up to the year 2050 are analyzed. A number of ageing characteristics (proportions of the population aged 65+ and 80+, old age dependency ratio, median age) are considered.
PubMed ID
18306685 View in PubMed
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[Aging of population in Russia as cause of increase in mortality from diseases of blood circulation system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167297
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2006 May-Jun;(3):8-16
Publication Type
Article

Alcohol and Russian mortality: a continuing crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149112
Source
Addiction. 2009 Oct;104(10):1630-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
David A Leon
Vladimir M Shkolnikov
Martin McKee
Author Affiliation
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
Source
Addiction. 2009 Oct;104(10):1630-6
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality
Alcohol-Related Disorders - mortality
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Bias (epidemiology)
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Data Collection - methods
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Public Health
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Russia remains in the grip of a mortality crisis in which alcohol plays a central role. In 2007, male life expectancy at birth was 61 years, while for females it was 74 years. Alcohol is implicated particularly in deaths among working-age men.
To review the current state of knowledge about the contribution of alcohol to the continuing very high mortality seen among Russian adults
Conservative estimates attribute 31-43% of deaths among working-age men to alcohol. This latter estimate would imply a minimum of 170 000 excess deaths due to hazardous alcohol consumption in Russia per year. Men drink appreciably more than women in Russia. Hazardous drinking is most prevalent among people with low levels of education and those who are economically disadvantaged, partly because some of the available sources of ethanol are very cheap and easy to obtain. The best estimates available suggest that per capita consumption among adults is 15-18 litres of pure ethanol per year. However, reliable estimation of the total volume of alcohol consumed per capita in Russia is very difficult because of the diversity of sources of ethanol that are available, for many of which data do not exist. These include both illegal spirits, as well as legal non-beverage alcohols (such as medicinal tinctures). In 2006 regulations were introduced aimed at reducing the production and sale of non-beverage alcohols that are commonly drunk. These appear to have been only partially successful.
There is convincing evidence that alcohol plays an important role in explaining high mortality in Russia, in particular among working age men. However, there remain important uncertainties about the precise scale of the problem and about the health effects of the distinctive pattern of alcohol consumption that is prevalent in Russia today. While there is a need for further research, enough is known to justify the development of a comprehensive inter-sectoral alcohol control strategy. The recent fall in life expectancy in Russia should give a renewed urgency to attempts to move the policy agenda forward.
PubMed ID
19681805 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the growing number of deaths of unidentified people in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159626
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Jun;18(3):252-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Evgueni Andreev
William Alex Pridemore
Vladimir M Shkolnikov
Olga I Antonova
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Konrad Zuse Strasse 1, Rostock 18057, Germany.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Jun;18(3):252-7
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Social Isolation
Abstract
We examined mortality among working-age Russian men whose identity could not be determined, focusing on where and how they died.
Employing micro-data from deaths that occurred in Izhevsk (Ural region) between June 2004 and September 2005, we analysed the characteristics of decedent men aged 25-54 (n = 2158). Differences between completely identified (n = 1699) and unidentified deaths (n = 282) were compared via logistic regression. Data on all deaths in Russia in 2002 were used for supplemental comparisons.
We found that relative to identified men, unidentified men were at a higher risk of death from exposure to natural cold, violence, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, acute respiratory infections and poisonings. Our results also revealed that alcohol played an important role in the mortality of unidentified men. The places and causes of death among these unidentified men provide substantial evidence of their homelessness and social isolation.
The increase in deaths among unidentified men of working-age indicates the emergence of a health threat associated with homelessness and social marginalization. This vulnerable group is exposed to different levels and causes of mortality compared with the larger population and represent a new challenge that requires serious and immediate scholarly attention and policy responses.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Nov 3;323(7320):1051-511691766
Cites: Addiction. 2002 Nov;97(11):1413-2512410782
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Oct;57(8):1343-5412927465
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Mar 11;279(10):790-19508158
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jun 16;369(9578):2001-917574092
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Oct;29(10):1884-816269919
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Apr;57(4):44716603735
Cites: Addiction. 2006 Dec;101(12):1719-2917156171
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Aug 1;317(7154):312-89685275
PubMed ID
18160388 View in PubMed
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[A strategy of health for all--are we reaching our target to reduce mortality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24547
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jan 10;112(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1992
Author
B. Guldvog
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for forebyggende og helsefremmende arbeid, Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jan 10;112(1):57-63
Date
Jan-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Health Policy - trends
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
In the late seventies the World Health Organization developed a strategy of Health for all towards year 2000, to which Norwegian health authorities have consented. This article presents and discusses the sub-goals for expectation of life and mortality, and analyzes the possibilities of reaching them. The desired reduction of at least 25% in accident mortality rates and cardiovascular mortality rates in relation to the reference period 1976-80 will probably be reached. In addition, the desired 15% reduction in cancer mortality is likely to be reached for persons under 40 years of age. Infant mortality does not appear to be declining, cancer mortality for people over 40 years of age is increasing, and the suicidal and homicidal rates are increasing faster than any other cause of death. The possibilities of reversing this development require a structured plan and comprehensive changes in the way society is organized, with more emphasis on care, social network planning and reduction of the multicausal risk load that modern life implies. Some of the sub-goals are not sufficiently founded on accessible information, and should be revised.
PubMed ID
1553648 View in PubMed
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Body composition and mortality risk in later life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122413
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Sep;41(5):677-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Fredrik Toss
Peder Wiklund
Peter Nordström
Anna Nordström
Author Affiliation
Sports Medicine - Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå, Sweden. fredrik.toss@idrott.umu.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Sep;41(5):677-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Obesity - complications - mortality
Overweight - complications - mortality
Risk factors
Abstract
body mass index is used widely to define overweight and obesity. Both high and low body mass indices are associated with increased mortality risk during middle age, but the relationship is less clear in later life. Thus, studies on the relationships between other aspects of body composition and mortality among older subjects are needed.
to investigate associations between different aspects of body composition and mortality in older people.
the study population comprised 921 participants aged =65 years who underwent dual-energy X-ray (DXA) absorptiometric examination at the Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University. The main reason for admission was clinical suspicion of osteoporosis. Total, abdominal and gynoid fat masses and lean body mass were measured by DXA absorptiometry at baseline, and the cohort was followed (mean duration, 9.2 years) for mortality events.
during follow-up, 397 participants died. Lean mass was associated negatively with mortality in men and women (P
PubMed ID
22820447 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.