Skip header and navigation

Refine By

52 records – page 1 of 6.

Benzodiazepine prescription to middle-aged women: it is done indiscriminately by family physicians?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243325
Source
Postgrad Med. 1982 Apr;71(4):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1982
Author
W W Rosser
Source
Postgrad Med. 1982 Apr;71(4):115-20
Date
Apr-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Marriage
Middle Aged
Oxazepam - therapeutic use
Physician's Role
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - drug therapy
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
It has been frequently suggested that physicians' indiscriminate prescribing has caused the high level of patient use of benzodiazepines. To determine whether this was true at Ottawa Civic Hospital's Family Medicine Centre, patient charts of women aged 45 to 65-the age-sex group that received the highest number of new prescriptions for diazepam (Valium) or oxazepam (Serax) - were studied. Middle-aged women who received a new prescription for one of these drugs visited the office significantly more often, had more marital problems, and experienced significantly more life crisis situation than a control group of nonrecipients. These results suggest that the high rate of prescribing is related to high levels of reported life stress in middle-aged women. Further studies in other centers are needed to conclusively disprove the popularly held idea that benzodiazepines are indiscriminately prescribed by physicians.
PubMed ID
6122203 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comment on Sune Nyström. Relation of prevention of social problems to virtues and morality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243663
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1982;10(1):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Coping among the non-institutionalised ill elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236906
Source
Med J Malaysia. 1986 Jun;41(2):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
V. Thambypillai
Source
Med J Malaysia. 1986 Jun;41(2):116-22
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged - psychology
Denmark
Humans
Life Change Events
Sick Role
PubMed ID
3821606 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 24;150(43):2561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-1988
Author
G. Odden Petersen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 24;150(43):2561-2
Date
Oct-24-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crisis Intervention
Disaster planning
Humans
Life Change Events
Netherlands
Norway
PubMed ID
3206658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression in unemployed Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46719
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(12):1349-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
E M Hall
J V Johnson
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(12):1349-55
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Life Change Events
Marriage
Personality Inventory
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Unemployment
Abstract
Two groups of Swedish women--51 employed and 96 unemployed--were compared in terms of their scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). It was hypothesized that unemployed women would be more depressed than their employed counterparts and further that the distress of unemployment would be reflected in elevations in cortisol values among those who were out of work. It was found, even when controlling for social support, stressful life events and marital status, that depression as seen in the BDI scores, was greater in the unemployed group. However, no relationship was observed between either cortisol and employment status or cortisol and depression.
PubMed ID
3238455 View in PubMed
Less detail

A descriptive study of life change events, health risk/benefit habits and illness/injury in an Anchorage population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292879
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1984
Author
Michaud, Marilyn
Date
1984
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Life change events -- Alaska
Stress (Physiology)
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Notes
RC 455.4.L53 M53 1984
Less detail

Employment, marital status and alcohol consumption of young Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238105
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1985 Nov;46(6):538-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
N. Layne
P C Whitehead
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1985 Nov;46(6):538-40
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Canada
Employment
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Marriage
Unemployment
Abstract
This article focuses on heavy alcohol consumption among young Canadian men drinkers aged 15-29 and examines how employment status and marital status interact with age. The study found that the highest percentages of heavy drinkers occurred in men over the age of 18 who are single (divorced, separated or never married) and in the labor force, whether employed or unemployed. This study, based on cohort data, generated hypotheses that need to be tested with longitudinal data in order to better understand developmental differences and other factors that affect drinking practices.
PubMed ID
4087917 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiological studies of the association between psychosocial factors and gastrointestinal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235961
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1987;128:132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987

Factors influencing doctors' awareness of the life problems of middle-aged patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238120
Source
Med Care. 1985 Nov;23(11):1276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
M J Yaffe
M A Stewart
Source
Med Care. 1985 Nov;23(11):1276-82
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Awareness
Cognition
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patients - psychology
Personality
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Single Person
Social Support
Abstract
Because individuals who deal effectively with life events may be healthier, doctors may need to be aware of the important events in their patients' lives. This study was designed to document the actual level of awareness that 20 community family practitioners had of their middle-aged patients' life events. A total of 116 patients completed a life events questionnaire when they visited their family doctors. The physicians completed a similar questionnaire for each patient. A comparison between the patients' and physicians' responses provided the measure of doctors' awareness. Doctors were found to be aware of approximately 25% of all patients' life events. Awareness was inversely associated with patients' self-reliance and directly associated with age of patients and with those events having a negative effect. The observed level of knowledge may be unacceptably low, in which case physicians must find ways to improve their knowledge. Alternatively, this level of knowledge may be realistic, given that some patients may not need to discuss their life events, particularly self-reliant patients or patients experiencing events that did not affect them negatively. If this is the case, family physicians need to find ways of determining the patients and events for which their knowledge would be helpful.
PubMed ID
4068795 View in PubMed
Less detail

52 records – page 1 of 6.