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318 records – page 1 of 32.

Abortion, sterilization, and sex education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250232
Source
Int Dig Health Legis. 1977;28(3): 614-620 1977):Unknown
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K H Beine
Author Affiliation
Hans-Prinzhorn-Klinik, Hemer.
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Date
1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Liability, Legal
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional Impairment - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The phenomenon of patient homicides committed by health service employees has, in the previous years, repeatedly aroused much attention. The cases made known in Germany, the USA, Holland, Norway, and Austria appear to provide evidence to the effect that we are not only dealing with unique incidents. The scientific investigation of this especially sensitive taboo-topic is, to date, missing. The judicial trials carried out emphatically indicate that culprit motives, colleague behavior, but also to a large extent decisions made by superiors remain unclear. It remains controversial, what effect working conditions, strain of employees, their level of education and personal viewpoints over such criminal acts they possess. Finally, the long latency period between the first internal suspicions and the responsible parties' appropriate reactions requires duplicatable explanation. The following paper presents a German single-case study of patient homicide by a female nurse. The focus on causality rests on the presentation of developments up to the point where the long-fermenting suspicion could no longer be dismissed, and appropriate consequences took place. The account largely avoids the "definite" findings required during the judicial process. It concerns rather above all an open, uncertain, and possibly without external influence course of development which in stages each colleague in the health professions can trace, to the point where the uncertain and horrifying suspicion became a certainty. With this single-case study in hand it is made understandable in which ways personal circumstances and professional conditions at the worksituation can intertwine in such a way that the original motivation to help turns into its abysmal opposite. It is the author's intention to make preventive learning possible through this single case study. Every employee in the health professions should proceed on the assumption that such occurrences could also in his own field of work come to pass. In this respect, it is of considerable importance to differentiate between hasty and untenable incriminations and original increasing early-warning signs.
PubMed ID
7785282 View in PubMed
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Access to cardiac resources in Canada: who is responsible? Who is liable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202874
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
H E Scully
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Cardiovascular Diseases - therapy
Emergencies
Ethics, Medical
Hospital Departments
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Liability, Legal
Malpractice
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Oct;15(10):1085-810523473
PubMed ID
10079772 View in PubMed
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Addressing the emergence of pediatric vaccination concerns: recommendations from a Canadian policy analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169730
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kumanan Wilson
Meredith Barakat
Edward Mills
Paul Ritvo
Heather Boon
Sunita Vohra
Alejandro R Jadad
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. Kumanan.Wilson@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Compensation and Redress
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs
Liability, Legal - economics
Organizational Objectives
Pediatrics
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Ever since the advent of pediatric vaccination, individuals have expressed concerns about both its risks and benefits. These concerns have once again resurfaced among some segments of the population and could potentially undermine national vaccination programs. The views of the public, however, must be considered and respected in the formulation of vaccination policy. We have conducted an analysis of the pediatric vaccination "debate" in the Canadian context. We believe that there is common ground between those who support pediatric vaccination and those who are concerned about these programs. Based on our findings, we believe that the goal of public health authorities should be to maintain trust in vaccines by continuing to meet certain reciprocal responsibilities. To do so, we recommend the following: 1) increased investment in adverse event reporting systems; 2) request for proposals for consideration of a no-fault compensation program; 3) developing pre-emptive strategies to deal with potential vaccine risks; 4) further examination of mechanisms to improve communication between physicians and parents concerned about vaccination. All of these approaches would require additional investment in pediatric vaccination. However, such an investment is easy to justify given the benefits offered by pediatric vaccination and the ramifications of failing to maintain confidence in vaccination programs or missing a vaccine-related adverse event.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-916619991
PubMed ID
16620003 View in PubMed
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Anticipatory refusals and the action of 'wrongful living'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180966
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;5(1):67-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
C. Gavaghan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Glasgow, UK.
Source
Med Law Int. 2000;5(1):67-80
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directive Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Euthanasia, Passive - legislation & jurisprudence
Great Britain
Humans
Liability, Legal
Life Support Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Malpractice
Physicians - legislation & jurisprudence
Treatment Refusal - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Wrongful Life
Abstract
After years of debate, opinion among bioethicists and medical lawyers seems to have accepted that anticipatory refusals of medical treatment can, and furthermore should, be accorded the same legal status as contemporaneous refusals. But what would be the legal repercussions for a medic who treated an incompetent patient in contravention of such a directive? What remedies would be available to the claimant whose life had been extended contrary to his express wishes? This issue has never been explicitly addressed by the UK courts, but this paper looks at some of the conclusions and inferences we can perhaps draw from other, possible analogous areas of law. It also considers several North American cases that have addressed this issue, and asks what lessons we can learn therefrom.
PubMed ID
15040378 View in PubMed
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318 records – page 1 of 32.