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Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption has a protective effect against hematological malignancies: a population-based study in Sweden including 420,489 individuals with alcohol use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262809
Source
Neoplasia. 2014 Mar;16(3):229-34, 234.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Jianguang Ji
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Neoplasia. 2014 Mar;16(3):229-34, 234.e1
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been suggested that alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of a few solid cancers, although studies that examined the association with hematological malignancies have shown inconsistent results. In this study, we examined the risk of hematological malignancies among individuals who had alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in Sweden.
Individuals with AUDs were identified from the nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and Outpatient Register, the Crime Register, and the Prescription Drug Register, and they were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of hematological malignancies, using those Swedes without AUDs as a reference. In addition, we used a quasi-experimental sibling design to investigate the odds ratios among sibling pairs who were discordant with AUDs.
A total of 420,489 individuals were identified with AUDs. After more than 15 million person-years of follow-up, a total of 1755 individuals developed hematological malignancies demonstrating a low risk, i.e., SIR = 0.60 (95% confidence interval = 0.57-0.63). People with AUDs had low risks for developing specific types of malignancies. The lowest risk (0.51) was for leukemia, followed by myeloma (0.52), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (0.65), and Hodgkin disease (0.71). The risk was lower among AUDs identified at an older age. The low risks of hematological malignancies were also noted using sibling analysis.
Our data suggest that alcohol consumption has a protective effect against hematological malignancies. However, further studies are needed to identity the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of alcohol consumption against hematological malignancies.
Notes
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Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2012 Sep 1;30(25):3150-1; author reply 3152-322826277
PubMed ID
24783999 View in PubMed
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Alpha-particle carcinogenesis in Thorotrast patients: epidemiology, dosimetry, pathology, and molecular analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19345
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Y. Ishikawa
I. Wada
M. Fukumoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, The Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo.
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2001;20(4):311-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alpha Particles - adverse effects
Carcinogens - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Cholangiocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
DNA Damage
DNA Mutational Analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genes, p53
Half-Life
Hemangiosarcoma - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - etiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Loss of Heterozygosity
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Thorium Dioxide - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
United States
Abstract
We studied the alpha-radiation risks in patients who received injections of Thorotrast, an X-ray contrast medium used in Europe, Japan, and the United States from 1930 to 1955. Thorotrast was composed of thorium dioxide (ThO2) and Th-232, a naturally occurring radionuclide. Because the physical half-life of ThO2 is 14 billion years and Thorotrast is hardly eliminated from the body, tissues in which it was deposited are irradiated by alpha-radiation for the entire lifetime of the subject. The dosimetry of Thorotrast patients is very complicated, but currently its reliability is quite high compared with other irradiated populations. The major causes of the death of Thorotrast patients are liver cancer, liver cirrhosis, leukemia, and other cancers. Three histologies of liver cancer are found: cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and angiosarcoma. Although cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent, angiosarcoma is characteristic of alpha-radiation. Among blood neoplasms with a higher incidence of increase than the general population, erythroleukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome were remarkable. Thorotrast patients exhaled a high concentration of radon (Rn-220), a progeny of Th-232, but no excesses of lung cancer in the patients of Japan, Germany, and Denmark were reported. Mutation analyses of p53 genes and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies at 17p locus were performed to characterize the genetic changes in Thorotrast-induced liver tumors. Interestingly, LOH, supposedly corresponding to large deletions was not frequent; most mutations were transitions, also seen in tumors of the general population, suggesting that genetic changes of Thorotrast-induced cancers are mainly delayed mutations, and not the result of the direct effects of radiation.
PubMed ID
11797840 View in PubMed
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Animal-related occupations and the risk of leukemia, myeloma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188838
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Lin Fritschi
Kenneth C Johnson
Erich V Kliewer
Rick Fry
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia. linf@dph.uwa.edu.au
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
There is some evidence to suggest that workers in animal-related occupations are at increased risk of developing lymphohematopoietic cancers. This study aimed to examine the risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma associated with occupational exposure to animals.
We used data from a multi-site, population-based case-control study using mailed questionnaires which had taken place in eight of ten Canadian provinces, during 1994-1998. There were 1023 leukemia cases, 1577 NHL cases, and 324 multiple myeloma cases (all histologically confirmed) and 4688 population-based controls. Animal-related occupations were identified from a lifetime occupational history. Subjects in animal-related jobs were compared with others using logistic regression for the risk of leukemia, NHL, and multiple myeloma.
Compared to subjects without occupational exposure to animals, occupational exposure to beef cattle increased the risks of leukemia (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.3) and NHL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9). No other animal exposure was consistently associated with risk of lymphohematopoietic cancer. An unexpected protective association was observed between work as a fisherman and leukemia (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) and NHL (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9).
This population-based case-control study found that those individuals working in occupations associated with beef cattle are at increased risk for developing leukemia and lymphoma while those working in occupations requiring the handling of fish are at decreased risk of leukemia and lymphoma.
PubMed ID
12195646 View in PubMed
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Are sunlight deprivation and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute leukemia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93907
Source
Haematologica. 2007 Nov;92(11):1553-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Timonen Timo
Näyhä Simo
Koskela Tapani
Pukkala Eero
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Haematologica. 2007 Nov;92(11):1553-6
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Influenza, Human - complications
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - epidemiology - etiology
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Month of diagnosis of 7,423 cases of acute leukemia (AL) in Finland during 1964-2003 were linked with data on influenza and solar radiation. Acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) showed the highest risk in the dark season. During the light season, the incidence decreased by 58% (95% confidence interval, 16-79%) per 1,000 kJ/m(2)/d increase of solar radiation. Independent of solar radiation, AML increased by 9% (95% confidence interval, 0-19%) during influenza epidemics. Reoccurring at the same time annually, darkness-related vitamin D deficiency and influenza could cause successive and co-operative mutations leading to AL with a short latency.
PubMed ID
18024404 View in PubMed
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Assessment of selection bias in the Canadian case-control study of residential magnetic field exposure and childhood leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157175
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Jun 15;167(12):1504-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2008
Author
Gabor Mezei
John J Spinelli
Paul Wong
Marilyn Borugian
Mary L McBride
Author Affiliation
Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, USA. gmezei@epri.com
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Jun 15;167(12):1504-10
Date
Jun-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Selection Bias
Social Class
Abstract
The authors evaluated the role of selection bias in the 1999 Canadian case-control study of residential magnetic field exposure and childhood leukemia. They included cases, participating controls, and first-choice nonparticipating controls in their analyses. Exposure was assessed by wire coding, a classification system based on the distribution line characteristics near homes. Although an imperfect measure of magnetic field exposure, wire coding is the only method applicable to nonparticipating subjects. First-choice nonparticipant controls tended to be of lower socioeconomic status than their replacements (non-first-choice participant controls), and lower socioeconomic status was related to higher wire code categories. The odds ratios for developing childhood leukemia in the highest exposure category were 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 2.6) when the actual participating controls were used and 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.8, 2.1) when the first-choice ideal controls were used, regardless of their participation. Overall, the authors conclude that, although there is some evidence for control selection or participation bias in the Canadian study, it is unlikely to explain entirely the observed association between magnetic field exposure and childhood leukemia. Inherent problems in exposure assessment for nonparticipating subjects, however, limit the interpretations of these results, and the role of selection bias cannot entirely be dismissed on the basis of these results alone.
PubMed ID
18483123 View in PubMed
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Association between influenza during pregnancy and childhood leukaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254198
Source
Br Med J. 1973 Nov 3;4(5887):265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-1973
Author
T. Hakulinen
L. Hovi
Karkinen-Jääskeläinen
K. Penttinen
L. Saxén
Source
Br Med J. 1973 Nov 3;4(5887):265-7
Date
Nov-3-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Orthomyxoviridae - isolation & purification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Abstract
This report based on the data available from the Finnish Cancer Registry and from virus isolations gives further support to the association (P=0.04) between maternal influenza of the 1957 "Asian" type and subsequent later leukaemia in the infants. No such association was found from other influenza epidemics.
Notes
Cites: Ann Clin Res. 1969 Dec;1(4):291-3005371916
Cites: Lancet. 1971 Dec 18;2(7738):1346-74108264
Cites: Br Med J. 1972 May 27;2(5812):485-84337948
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1972 Sep 15;114(2):239-424628993
Cites: Br Med J. 1972 Dec 16;4(5841):631-44674941
Cites: Br Med J. 1973 Mar 24;1(5855):706-84348514
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1972;47(4):449-524540994
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1960;49:114-2614442130
PubMed ID
4753239 View in PubMed
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Cancer among children of parents with autoimmune diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20053
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Apr;82(7):1353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
F. Alexander
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Apr;82(7):1353-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - complications - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Lymphoma - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Abstract
Many different aetiologies for childhood cancer have been suggested, but few are well established. One is that parental autoimmune disease is linked with susceptibility for haematopoietic malignancies in their offspring during childhood. The present study is the first to investigate this hypothesis using a follow-up design. A cohort of 53,811 children of more than 36,000 patients diagnosed with a systemic, organ-specific or suspected autoimmune disease were followed up for cancer incidence in the Danish Cancer Registry during 1968-1993. The parents were identified through the National Registry of Patients, while their children were traced in the Central Population Register. Cancer incidence among the offspring was compared with that in the corresponding childhood population of Denmark. In total, 115 cancers were observed among children aged 0-19 years, yielding a non-significant standardized incidence ratio of 1.07. Lymphomas contributed 21 cases to the overall number of tumours, 60% more than expected (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.4); leukaemia contributed 37 cases representing an excess of 30% (95% CI 0.9-1.8). Our results give some support to the hypothesis that parental autoimmune disease is associated with childhood lymphoma and leukaemia.
PubMed ID
10755414 View in PubMed
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[Cancer and magnetic fields in persons living close to high voltage power lines in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24266
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 9;89(50):4371-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1992
Author
M. Feychting
A. Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Båda vid Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 9;89(50):4371-4
Date
Dec-9-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Housing
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1993 May 26;90(21):20288502045
PubMed ID
1469972 View in PubMed
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Cancer at sea: a case-control study among male Finnish seafarers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188737
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Sep;59(9):613-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Heikki Saarni
J. Pentti
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20500 Turku, Finland. heikki.saarni@occuphealth.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Sep;59(9):613-9
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the possible work related reasons for the increased incidence of many cancers among seafarers.
A case-control study, nested in a cohort of all male seafarers (n = 30 940) who, according to the files of the Seamen's Pension Fund, had worked on board Finnish ships for any time during the period 1960-80. Cases of cancer of the lung, nervous system, kidney, and pancreas, leukaemia, lymphoma, and all cases histologically defined as mesotheliomas were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry in 1967-92. The preceding numbers of years at sea in various occupational categories were collected according to the type of ship (dry cargo ship, tanker, passenger vessel, icebreaker, other vessel).
The incidence for lung cancer among engine crew increased with the increase in employment time, the odds ratio (OR) after three years being 1.68 (95% CI 1.17 to 2.41). The OR of lung cancer for deck officers was 0.42 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.61). Deck personnel on icebreakers had a significantly increased risk of lung cancer > or =20 years after first employment (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.23 to 9.49). The OR for mesothelioma among engine crew with a latency of 20 years was 9.75 (95% CI 1.88 to 50.6). The OR for renal cancer among deck officers after three years employment was 2.15 (95% CI 1.14 to 4.08), but there was no increase by employment time or by latency. A rise of OR for lymphoma was detected among deck personnel on tankers, if the employment had lasted over three years (OR 2.78, 95% CI 0.98 to 7.92). The risk pattern for leukaemia was similar to that of lymphoma, the OR among deck personnel on tankers varying from 2.26 (95% CI 1.01 to 5.06) to 6.86 (95% CI 1.62 to 28.8) depending on the length of employment.
Results indicate that occupational exposures of deck crews on tankers add to their risk of renal cancer, leukaemia, and possibly lymphoma. Engine crews have an asbestos related risk of mesothelioma, and the engine room conditions also seem to increase risk of lung cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12205234 View in PubMed
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93 records – page 1 of 10.