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Acute myeloid leukemia and background radiation in an expanded case-referent study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25084
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;45(6):364-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Flodin
M. Fredriksson
B. Persson
O. Axelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;45(6):364-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure
Gamma Rays - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A case-referent study that investigated possible associations between environmental and occupational exposures and acute myeloid leukemia was performed on 86 cases and 172 referents, all of whom were living. Exposure information was obtained through a questionnaire mailed to each subject. An association was found between time spent in concrete buildings at home and work and leukemia morbidity. In addition, extensive x-ray examinations that occurred more than 5 y prior to diagnosis were more common among cases than referents.
PubMed ID
2270956 View in PubMed
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An ecological analysis of leukemia incidence around the highest 137Cs concentration in Poland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19567
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A. Tukiendorf
Author Affiliation
Technical University, Opole, Poland. antu@po.opole.pl
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Bayes Theorem
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Markov Chains
Poland - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Ukraine
Abstract
Cancer has long been known to be a hazard of exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the assessment of health effects from exposure to radiation is a matter of considerable controversy. This paper presents results of a retrospective study of leukemia incidence (203-207, ICD-9) around the highest 137Cs pollution in Poland (as an effect of the Czarnobyl disaster and/or military bomb tests). The data relating to all the registered leukemias in males and females originated from the Regional Cancer Registry in Opole. The information on 137Cs concentration rates in Opole province was derived from the state monitoring provided by the Polish Geological Institute in Warsaw. The spatial analysis--based on the random-effects Poisson regression model--was carried out via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique (Gibbs sampling) using BUGS software. The model incorporated epidemiological data and an ecological covariate--isotope concentrations--and provided a framework for estimating the strength of a dose-response relationship. The differences in incidence levels were quantified by traditional standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) and presented in thematic maps as well as in combined charts of distance-disease-dose relations. Additionally, to assess spatial disease clustering, a Tango test was adopted. The results of this ecological study suggest that the 137Cs concentrations did not have any negative influence on the exposed population.
PubMed ID
11552713 View in PubMed
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Background radiation, electrical work, and some other exposures associated with acute myeloid leukemia in a case-referent study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26398
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1986 Mar-Apr;41(2):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Flodin
M. Fredriksson
B. Persson
L. Hardell
O. Axelson
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1986 Mar-Apr;41(2):77-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Background Radiation - adverse effects
Catchment Area (Health)
Construction Materials
Electricity
Environmental Exposure
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gamma Rays
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Questionnaires
Radiation, Ionizing - adverse effects
Radiography - adverse effects
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Solvents - poisoning
Sweden
Abstract
The effect of potential risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 59 cases and 354 referents, all of whom were alive. Information on exposure was obtained through a questionnaire mailed to the subjects. The possible effect of background radiation was evaluated by means of a gamma radiation index, which accounted for the differences between cases and referents in this respect, i.e., in time spent in concrete buildings both at home and at work places. In the 20-54 yr old age group, there was an association between leukemia morbidity and index of background radiation. X-ray treatment and electrical work were also associated with increased rate ratios. With regard to solvents, only styrene appeared as a risk factor, but the number of exposed subjects was small. Other exposures were less clearly associated with increased risks.
PubMed ID
3459400 View in PubMed
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Cancer consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Europe outside the former USSR: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22550
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jul 29;67(3):343-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-1996
Author
D. Sali
E. Cardis
L. Sztanyik
A. Auvinen
A. Bairakova
N. Dontas
B. Grosche
A. Kerekes
Z. Kusic
C. Kusoglu
S. Lechpammer
M. Lyra
J. Michaelis
E. Petridou
Z. Szybinski
S. Tominaga
R. Tulbure
A. Turnbull
Z. Valerianova
Author Affiliation
Programme on Radiation and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jul 29;67(3):343-52
Date
Jul-29-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The accident which occurred during the night of April 25-26, 1986 in reactor 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine released considerable amounts of radioactive substances into the environment. Outside the former USSR, the highest levels of contamination were recorded in Bulgaria, Austria, Greece and Romania, followed by other countries of Central, Southeast and Northern Europe. Studies of the health consequences of the accident have been carried out in these countries, as well as in other countries in Europe. This report presents the results of a critical review of cancer studies of the exposed population in Europe, carried out on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident. Overall, three is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the Chernobyl accident in the field of cancer in countries of Europe outside the former USSR.
PubMed ID
8707407 View in PubMed
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A case-control analysis of leukemia in accident emergency workers of Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20341
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2000;19(1-2):143-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A P Konogorov
V K Ivanov
S Y Chekin
S E Khait
Author Affiliation
Medical Radiological Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk, Kaluga Region.
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 2000;19(1-2):143-51
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Power Plants
Risk factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
We estimated the radiation-induced risk of leukemia in 162,684 Chernobyl accident emergency workers (EWs) using the data of the Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry (RNMDR). A system was established for the collection and verification of data in 55 cases of leukemia from 1986 to 1995. The principal analysis included 41 leukemia cases that occurred more than 2 years after the first exposure to radiation. The case-control methodology was used to evaluate the risk of leukemia associated with various factors. Radiation dose, effective exposure dose rate, date of entry into the Chernobyl zone (ChZ), and the duration of stay in the zone were used as risk factors. The relationship between the date of entry and the duration of stay in the zone was investigated. All cases of leukemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), were analyzed. An analysis was also performed on all EWs and on the EWs who worked in the zone from 1986 to 1987 (EWs of 1986 to 1987). No significant association was found between the risk of leukemia and the factors we investigated. Nevertheless, the relative risk estimates for leukemia, excluding CLL, were greater than the value for all leukemia and were greater than one. The estimated excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy was greater for all EWs [ERR = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): -6.25, 8.90 for all leukemia, and ERR = 15.59, 95% CI: -24.92, 56.11 for leukemia, excluding CLL] compared with EWs of 1986 to 1987 (ERR = 0.28, 95% CI: -5.84, 7.41 for all leukemia, and ERR = 9.43, 95% CI: -20.0, 38.86 for leukemia, excluding CLL).
PubMed ID
10905520 View in PubMed
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[Chernobyl--from a forgotten hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24033
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 May 26;93(21):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

Chernobyl-related ionising radiation exposure and cancer risk: an epidemiological review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19088
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2002 May;3(5):269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Kirsten B Moysich
Ravi J Menezes
Arthur M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14226, USA. kirsten.moyisch@roswellpark.org
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2002 May;3(5):269-79
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Air Pollution, Radioactive
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation, Ionizing
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear accident on 26th April, 1986, led to a massive release of radionuclides into the environment. Although vast areas of Europe were affected by Chernobyl-related ionising radiation, the accident had the greatest impact in Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation. Epidemiological studies that have investigated the link between the Chernobyl accident and cancer have largely focused on malignant diseases in children, specifically thyroid cancer and leukaemia. There is good evidence to suggest that rates of thyroid cancer in children from the countries that were formally part of the Soviet Union have risen as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. The findings for childhood leukaemia are less conclusive. Overall rates for this disease do not seem to have been affected by the Chernobyl-related ionising radiation, but there may be a larger risk of infant leukaemia in contaminated areas of Europe. Among adult populations, there is no strong evidence to suggest that risk of thyroid cancer, leukaemia, or other malignant disease has increased as a result of the Chernobyl accident.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Oncol. 2002 Sep;3(9):527-812217789
PubMed ID
12067803 View in PubMed
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Childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma in young people living close to nuclear reprocessing sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222416
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1993;47(10):429-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
L J Kinlen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Primary Care, University of Oxford, UK.
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1993;47(10):429-34
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Fathers
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Japan - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Ontario - epidemiology
Preconception Care
Scotland - epidemiology
Space-Time Clustering
Abstract
An increased incidence of leukaemia and NHL has been recorded close to Britain's two nuclear reprocessing sites at Sellafield in West Cumbria and Dounreay in Northern Scotland. Two hypotheses have been advanced to explain the excesses - paternal preconceptional irradiation (PPI) and an infective basis promoted by population mixing. Subsequent studies have provided no support for the PPI hypothesis and have also shown that this was derived from the analysis of a sub-group. In contrast, support for the population mixing hypothesis has come from a series of studies of residential and occupational situations. One of these showed that the excess near Dounreay was part of a wider increase in rural areas of Scotland affected by the unusual mixing associated with away-from-home work in the North Sea oil industry, being more marked in areas of relatively high social class. It is probable that the excess in Seascale is due to related demographic factors, this parish being extreme in its high social class, geographic isolation and its proximity to Sellafield, the largest, most changing industrial site in rural Britain.
PubMed ID
8061241 View in PubMed
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Childhood leukemia and magnetic fields in infant incubators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19341
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Jan;13(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Karin C Söderberg
Estelle Naumburg
Gert Anger
Sven Cnattingius
Anders Ekbom
Maria Feychting
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Karin.Soderberg@imm.ki.se
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Jan;13(1):45-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incubators, Infant
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In studies of magnetic field exposure and childhood leukemia, power lines and other electrical installations close to the children's homes constitute the most extensively studied source of exposure. We conducted a study to assess whether exposure to magnetic fields in infant incubators is associated with an increased leukemia risk. We identified all children with leukemia born in Sweden between 1973 and 1989 from the national Cancer Registry and selected at random one control per case, individually matched by sex and time of birth, from the study base. We retrieved information about treatment in infant incubators from medical records. We made measurements of the magnetic fields inside the incubators for each incubator model kept by the hospitals. Exposure assessment was based on measurements of the magnetic field level inside the incubator, as well as on the length of treatment. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the risk estimates were close to unity for all exposure definitions. For acute myeloid leukemia, we found a slightly elevated risk, but with wide confidence intervals and with no indication of dose response. Overall, our results give little evidence that exposure to magnetic fields inside infant incubators is associated with an increased risk of childhood leukemia.
PubMed ID
11805585 View in PubMed
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[Cumulative radiation dosage and epidemiological research in the Chernobyl region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23788
Source
Ter Arkh. 1994;66(7):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A I Vorob'ev
E V Domracheva
G A Klevezal'
L M Meshcheriakova
T N Moiseeva
I V Osechinskii
V A Serezhenkov
N E Shklovskii-Kordi
Source
Ter Arkh. 1994;66(7):3-7
Date
1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation - statistics & numerical data
Byelarus - epidemiology
Chromosome Aberrations
Dental Enamel - chemistry - radiation effects
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
English Abstract
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Individual biological dosimetry covering chromosomal analysis and electronic paramagnetic resonance spectrometry has been performed in 1300 subjects exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident. Cumulative radiation doses above 40 ImC were registered in 5%, about 100 ImC in 1% of the examinees. In 1% of cytogenetic investigations there appeared multiaberrant cells indicative of hot particle incorporation. Regional epidemiologists do not record changes in the incidence of hematological diseases. This may be explained by a small percent of the dose carriers, rare occurrence of hematological disorders and the time of radiation-induced oncogenic effects. The above representative group exposed to definite radiation doses may serve the subject of epidemiological surveys on the role of low-dose and low-rate radiation in pathogenesis of human diseases.
PubMed ID
7985124 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.