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Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
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PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
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Acute care hospital days and mental diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116831
Source
Health Rep. 2012 Dec;23(4):61-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Helen Johansen
Philippe Finès
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. helen.johansen@gmail.com
Source
Health Rep. 2012 Dec;23(4):61-5
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
Data from the Discharge Abstract Database of the Canadian Institute for Health Information were used to examine acute care hospital days for patients with a mental condition coded as the most responsible diagnosis or a comorbid diagnosis. In 2009/2010, patients with a mental diagnosis represented 11.8% of people who had been hospitalized and 25.5% of acute care hospital days. Those for whom the mental condition was the most responsible diagnosis accounted for 9.0% of hospital days (1.2 million), and those with a comorbid mental diagnosis accounted for 16.5% of hospital days (2.3 million). Mental diagnoses were often associated with physical conditions. The average hospitalization with a mental diagnosis was two and a half times as long as the average for hospitalizations without a mental diagnosis. About one-quarter of hospital days with a mental diagnosis were designated as alternate level of care days.
PubMed ID
23356047 View in PubMed
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Acute care hospital utilization under Canadian national health insurance: the British Columbia experience from 1969 to 1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103710
Source
Inquiry. 1990;27(4):352-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
G M Anderson
I R Pulcins
M L Barer
R G Evans
C. Hertzman
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Services Research and Development, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Inquiry. 1990;27(4):352-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - economics - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost Control
Female
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Infant
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - trends
Abstract
This paper uses hospital separation abstracts to assess trends in acute care hospital utilization in British Columbia over the first 18 years of publicly funded health insurance in the province. Between 1969 and fiscal year 1987-88, the overall separation rate decreased by 16%, accompanied by a 23% decrease in average length of stay. For the elderly, the separation rate increased by 14% and three quarter of this increase was for surgical procedures, mostly new high-technology procedures. For the nonelderly, separation rates decreased by 25%. Lengths of stay decreased in both age groups. Over the last two decades overall separation rates in British Columbia were higher than or equal to separation rates in the United States, and lengths of stay were consistently higher in British Columbia. Since access to hospitals by the elderly is similar in the two countries, lower hospital costs in Canada result from factors other than lower overall hospital utilization or decreased access for the elderly.
PubMed ID
2148308 View in PubMed
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Acute care utilization due to hospitalizations for pediatric lower respiratory tract infections in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118363
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:451
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Pablo Santibanez
Katherine Gooch
Pamela Vo
Michelle Lorimer
Yurik Sandino
Author Affiliation
Abbott Laboratories, 200 Abbott Park Road, Abbott Park, IL 60064, USA.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:451
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Critical Care - utilization
Databases, Factual
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay - trends
Respiratory Tract Infections - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Pediatric LRTI hospitalizations are a significant burden on patients, families, and healthcare systems. This study determined the burden of pediatric LRTIs on hospital settings in British Columbia and the benefits of prevention strategies as they relate to healthcare resource demand.
LRTI inpatient episodes for patients
Notes
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Cites: Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2003 May;9(3):227-3212682569
Cites: J Pediatr. 2003 Nov;143(5 Suppl):S118-2614615710
Cites: J Pediatr. 2003 Nov;143(5 Suppl):S150-614615714
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 1;188(11):1764-714639549
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1991 Feb;66(2):227-312001109
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1997 Jul;131(1 Pt 1):113-79255201
Cites: Home Healthc Nurse. 2007 Jul-Aug;25(7):429-3217667001
PubMed ID
23217103 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study on increased length of stay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103251
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
L. McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Izaak Walton Killam Hospital, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine, Halifax.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):28-31
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Special - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay - trends
Mortality
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Patient Discharge - trends
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The epidemiologic triad of causation states that all illness results from a disequilibrium between host, agent and environmental factors. The "illness" investigated in this report--increased LOS--resulted from a combination of: patient factors--the increased prevalence of chronic diseases in childhood, a revolution in neonatal survival and an increase in survivorship in general for severe diseases, such as congenital anomalies and genetic diseases; agent factors--the transition from agents of infectious disease to agents of chronic disease as well as iatrogenesis; and health care environmental factors--equity issues involving the ethics of treatment, changes in medical technology and patterns of medical practice. The use of preadmission testing, increased participation by parents in the care of their children, an investigation of the appropriate venue for care of chronically ill children and the back transfer of recovering children to their home hospitals were recommended and considered by the hospital's administration and board of governors.
PubMed ID
2107108 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of mitral valve procedures using the European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155041
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(3):254-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
T. Kaartama
L. Heikkinen
A. Vento
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(3):254-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - surgery
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the usefulness of the Euroscore in the choice and outcome of mitral valve procedures undertaken at the Helsinki University Central Hospital.
Data from 378 patients was collected. predicted mortalities were calculated for all patients using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and different mitral valve procedures were compared with 30-day mortality, length of hospital care and rate of post-operative complications.
The mortality rate in the mitral valve repair (MVP) group decreased gradually from 5.9% (in 1999) to 2.2% (2003). The variation of annual mortality was higher in the mitral valve replacement (MVR) group. The predicted mortality given by Euroscore increased over the years in both groups. The mortality in the MVR group was nearly four times higher than in the MVP group. the length of both intensive and overall hospital stay decreased in patients with MVP procedures. Post-operative survival was 89% in the MVP patients and 74% in mvr patients after three years.
The results of mitral valve operations have improved. This is observed as decreased mortality rates and lengths of hospital care in the MVP group, although the predicted mortality rate was increased.
PubMed ID
18812276 View in PubMed
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Appendectomy in Sweden 1989-1993 assessed by the Inpatient Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33696
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1998 Oct;51(10):859-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
P. Blomqvist
H. Ljung
O. Nyrén
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1998 Oct;51(10):859-65
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Appendectomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Appendicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - trends
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Registries
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We analyzed all appendectomies in Sweden 1989-1993 (n = 60,306) recorded in the national Inpatient Registry. Our focus was on diagnostic accuracy, incidence rate of appendicitis, perforative appendicitis, and length of stay by day of admission and hospital category. The incidence rate of appendectomy decreased by 9.8% in women compared to 4.1% in men. Since the number of patients with an end diagnosis of appendicitis remained almost constant, diagnostic accuracy increased each year. This was more pronounced in women than men, seen in all hospital categories, and was higher for those admitted during periods of low capacity (weekends/ holidays). Perforated appendicitis did not increase. Duration of hospital stay decreased continuously, especially among the oldest. We found no indications of an increased frequency of complications, such as increases in the incidence rate of perforations or in the length of stay.
PubMed ID
9762879 View in PubMed
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[A study in Sollentuna 1984-1987: reduced utilization of hospital beds--mostly among the oldest patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231063
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 29;86(13):1141-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1989

Availability of data when heart failure patients are admitted to hospice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129487
Source
Congest Heart Fail. 2011 Nov-Dec;17(6):303-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sue Wingate
Kevin T Bain
Sarah J Goodlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Kaiser Permanente Mid-Atlantic States, Silver Spring, MD, USA. suzanne.j.wingate@kp.com
Source
Congest Heart Fail. 2011 Nov-Dec;17(6):303-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Heart Failure - therapy
Hospices - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
Guidelines recommend hospice care for patients with advanced heart failure (HF) who are approaching end of life. However, little is known about the data available when HF patients are admitted to hospice. This pilot study surveyed the staff from 100 hospices in the United States and Canada about how frequently data were provided to or obtained by the hospice when admitting HF patients and how important they perceived the data. The survey response rate was 66%. Overall, data were less often provided or obtained than rated important (aggregate mean difference, P
PubMed ID
22103922 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.