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107 records – page 1 of 11.

An empirical analysis of risk-taking in car driving and other aspects of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279332
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2016 Dec;97:57-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Kibrom A Abay
Fred L Mannering
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2016 Dec;97:57-68
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Automobile Driving - psychology
Decision Making
Denmark
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Young Adult
Abstract
The link between risk-taking behavior in various aspects of life has long been an area of debate among economists and psychologists. Using an extensive data set from Denmark, this study provides an empirical investigation of the link between risky driving and risk taking in other aspects of life, including risk-taking behavior in financial and labor-market decisions. Specifically, we establish significant positive correlations between individuals' risk-taking behavior in car driving and their risk-taking behavior in financial and labor-market decisions. However, we find that the strength of these correlations vary significantly between genders, and across risk decisions. These correlations and their differences across genders get stronger when we construct more "homogenous" groups by restricting our sample to those individuals with at least some stock-market participation. Overall, the empirical results in this study suggest that risk-taking behavior in various aspects of life can be associated, and our results corroborate previous evidence on the link between individuals' risk preferences across various aspects of life. This implies that individuals' driving behavior, which is commonly unobservable, can be more fully understood using observable labor market and financial decisions of individuals.
PubMed ID
27566958 View in PubMed
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An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120216
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2012;15(5):369-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
A. Ullenhag
M K Bult
A. Nyquist
M. Ketelaar
R. Jahnsen
L. Krumlinde-Sundholm
L. Almqvist
M. Granlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.ullenhag@ki.se
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2012;15(5):369-85
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Children - psychology
Female
Happiness
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Netherlands
Norway
Play and Playthings - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance.
In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6-17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation.
Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender.
Differences in school- and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most.
PubMed ID
23030304 View in PubMed
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Are changes in occupational physical activity level compensated by changes in exercise behavior?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300388
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):940-943
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Carla F J Nooijen
Borja Del Pozo-Cruz
Gisela Nyberg
Taren Sanders
Maria R Galanti
Yvonne Forsell
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):940-943
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior - physiology
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Physically active occupations with high-energy expenditure may lead to lower motivation to exercise during leisure time, while the reverse can be hypothesized for sedentary occupations. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of changing occupational activity level on exercise behavior.
Data on occupational physical activity and leisure time exercise were taken from a population-based cohort, with surveys completed in 2010 and 2014. Using data on those employed in both years, two trajectories were analyzed: (i) participants who changed from sedentary to active occupations and (ii) participants who changed from active to sedentary occupations. Exercise was reported in hours per week and changes from 2010 to 2014 were categorized as decreased, increased or stable. Associations were expressed as ORs and 95% CIs adjusting for age, gender and education.
Data were available for 12 969 participants (57% women, aged 45 ± 9 years, 57% highly educated). Relative to participants whose occupational activity was stable, participants who changed to active occupations (n = 549) were more likely to decrease exercise (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.02-1.47) and those who changed to sedentary occupations (n = 373) more likely to increase exercise levels (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.52).
People changing from sedentary to active occupations compensate by exercising less, and those changing from physically active to sedentary occupations seem to compensate by exercising more in their leisure time. When developing and evaluating interventions to reduce occupational sedentary behavior or to promote exercise, mutual influences on physical activity of different contexts should be considered.
PubMed ID
29385424 View in PubMed
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Assimilative and Accommodative Coping and Older People's Leisure Activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311464
Source
J Aging Health. 2020 Aug-Sep; 32(7-8):778-786
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Anu Tourunen
Sini Siltanen
Erja Portegijs
Johanna Eronen
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2020 Aug-Sep; 32(7-8):778-786
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Goals
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities - psychology
Mobility Limitation
Physical Functional Performance
Abstract
Objectives: Assimilative and accommodative coping strategies have hardly been studied in relation to leisure activities in old age. We investigated whether tenacious goal pursuit (TGP) and flexible goal adjustment (FGA) influence the association between physical performance and participation in leisure activities. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among 187 community-dwelling people aged 79 to 93 years. TGP, FGA, and leisure activity participation were asked with questionnaires. Physical performance was assessed with the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Results: TGP moderated the relationship between physical performance and leisure activity participation. Despite low physical performance, people with high TGP had close to mean level of leisure activity participation, whereas low TGP was associated with very little activity. Most notably, people without high TGP had fewer outdoor activities and group activities outside home. Similar effects were not found for FGA. Discussion: Persistency, rather than flexibility, in goal pursuit appears to help older people be active in their leisure time.
PubMed ID
31156014 View in PubMed
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Association between health-related quality of life, physical fitness, and physical activity in older adults recently discharged from hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103082
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):405-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Therese Brovold
Dawn A Skelton
Hilde Sylliaas
Morten Mowe
Astrid Bergland
Author Affiliation
Inst. of Physical Therapy, Oslo, and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):405-13
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Norway
Patient Discharge
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among health-related quality of life (HRQOL), physical fitness, and physical activity in older patients after recent discharge from hospital. One hundred fifteen independent-living older adults (ages 70-92 years) were included. HRQOL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey), physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly), and physical fitness (Senior Fitness Test) were measured 2-4 weeks after discharge. Higher levels of physical activity and physical fitness were correlated with higher self-reported HRQOL. Although cause and effect cannot be determined from this study, the results suggest that a particular focus on the value of physical activity and physical fitness while in hospital and when discharged from hospital may be important to encourage patients to actively preserve independence and HRQOL. It may be especially important to target those with lower levels of physical activity, poorer physical fitness, and multiple comorbidities.
PubMed ID
23981441 View in PubMed
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Association between neighbourhood green space and sedentary leisure time in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108033
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):846-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Rikke Lynge Storgaard
Henning Sten Hansen
Mette Aadahl
Charlotte Glümer
Author Affiliation
1Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):846-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary lifestyle
Young Adult
Abstract
Sedentary behaviour is a risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease etc., independently of level of physical activity. Availability of recreational green space is associated with physical activity, but is unknown in relation to sedentary behaviour. The aim of this study is to examine the association between availability of green space and sedentary leisure time in a Danish population.
The study was based on a random sample of 49,806 adults aged 16 + who answered a questionnaire in 2010, including sedentary leisure time. Objective measures of density green were calculated for each respondent using Geographical Information System (GIS). A multilevel regression analysis, taking neighbourhood and individual factors into account, was performed.
65% of the respondents were sedentary in leisure time for more than 3h/day. We found that poor availability of forest and recreational facilities in the neighbourhood is associated with more sedentary leisure time; OR: 1.11 (95% CL: 1.04-1.19), after adjusting for individual, and neighbourhood, level characteristics.
Among adult inhabitants, sedentary leisure time of more than 3h/day was more frequent in neighbourhoods with less green surroundings. Intervention efforts may benefit from emphasising the importance of having recreations options in residential areas to provide alternatives to sedentary activities.
PubMed ID
23945773 View in PubMed
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Association between psychosocial working conditions in mid-life and leisure activity in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311445
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2021 Mar; 49(2):168-175
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2021
Author
Charlotta Nilsen
Ross Andel
Neda Agahi
Johan Fritzell
Ingemar Kåreholt
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2021 Mar; 49(2):168-175
Date
Mar-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Aims: Leisure activity helps people engage with life, and it promotes health and well-being as we age. This study investigated whether individuals with active jobs (high psychological demands, high control) in mid-life were more active during leisure time in old age compared with those with less active jobs. Methods: Two individually linked Swedish surveys were used (N=776) with 23 years of follow-up. Data were analysed with logistic regression. Results: Having an active job in mid-life was associated with greater engagement in intellectual/cultural, social and physical activity in old age, even when leisure activity in mid-life was taken into account. Conclusions: The results suggest that active jobs in mid-life may be replaced by active leisure during retirement. Active job conditions may promote engagement in society in old age, which in turn may have positive health consequences.
PubMed ID
32031469 View in PubMed
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Association between vigor and exhaustion during the workweek: a person-centered approach to daily assessments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262862
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2014;27(5):555-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne Mäkikangas
Sanna Kinnunen
Johanna Rantanen
Saija Mauno
Asko Tolvanen
Arnold B Bakker
Source
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2014;27(5):555-75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Questionnaires
Work - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this quantitative diary study was to investigate daily vigor and exhaustion using a person-centered approach. The study also investigated whether and how experiences of vigor and exhaustion relate to a state of being recovered. A total of 256 Finnish employees filled in a diary questionnaire during five consecutive workdays. Vigor and exhaustion showed strong negative interdependence within and between days. However, by applying a person-centered analysis, we were able to differentiate three groups with meaningful variation in vigor and exhaustion. The groups were labeled as Constantly vigorous (n = 179), Concurrently vigorous and exhausted (n = 30) and Constantly exhausted (n = 43). The vigor-exhaustion groups were also characterized by their recovery experiences: The Constantly vigorous employees recovered well from work strain during the workweek whereas the Constantly exhausted group recovered poorly. Overall, while the results indicate that, typically, vigor and exhaustion are exclusive experiences, it is also possible for them to be experienced simultaneously from day to day at the moderate levels. Thus, positive and negative experiences may co-occur.
PubMed ID
24295506 View in PubMed
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Association of Self-Perceived Physical Competence and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Childhood-A Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287017
Source
J Sch Health. 2017 Apr;87(4):236-243
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lotta Hamari
Olli J Heinonen
Minna Aromaa
Riitta Asanti
Leena Koivusilta
Pasi Koski
Camilla Laaksonen
Jaakko Matomäki
Katja Pahkala
Anni Pakarinen
Sakari Suominen
Sanna Salanterä
Source
J Sch Health. 2017 Apr;87(4):236-243
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physical Fitness - psychology
Self Concept
Abstract
The basis of self-perceived physical competence is built in childhood and school personnel have an important role in this developmental process. We investigated the association between initial self-perceived physical competence and reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) longitudinally in 10-, 12-, and 15-year-old children.
This longitudinal follow-up study comprises pupils from an elementary school cohort (N = 1346) in the city of Turku, Finland (175,000 inhabitants). The self-perceived physical competence (fitness and appearance) and LTPA data were collected with questionnaires. The full longitudinal data were available from 571 pupils based on repeated studies at the ages of 10, 12, and 15 years in 2004, 2006, and 2010. We analyzed the association of self-perceived physical competence and LTPA using regression models.
Self-perceived physical competence was positively associated with LTPA at all ages (10 years p
PubMed ID
28260241 View in PubMed
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The benefits of sustained leisure-time physical activity on job strain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144735
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2010 Aug;60(5):369-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
X. Yang
R. Telama
M. Hirvensalo
M. Hintsanen
T. Hintsa
L. Pulkki-Råback
J S A Viikari
Author Affiliation
LIKES Research Centre for Sport and Health Sciences, Yliopistonkatu 20, Jyväskylä, Finland. xiaolin.yang@likes.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2010 Aug;60(5):369-75
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The long-term effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on job strain have not been assessed in a large prospective population-based cohort study.
To examine the relationship between the LTPA and the prevalence of job strain.
The participants were 861 full-time employees (406 men and 455 women), aged 24-39 years in 2001, from the ongoing Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. LTPA was assessed using a self-report questionnaire in 1992 and in 2001. The participants were grouped into four categories according to tertiles of LTPA index at two time points: persistently active, increasingly active, decreasingly active and persistently inactive. Job strain was measured in 2001 by indicators of job demands and job control.
Baseline LTPA was inversely associated with job strain (P
PubMed ID
20308257 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.