Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Canadian dietitians' attitudes toward functional foods and nutraceuticals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155256
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Judy Sheeshka
Bonnie J Lacroix
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Data Collection
Dietary Supplements - standards
Dietetics - methods - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling
Health Food - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Sciences - education
Questionnaires
Safety
Abstract
A telephone survey was conducted to determine dietitians' views on nutraceuticals and functional foods.
Using systematic sampling with a random start, 238 names were drawn from the Dietitians of Canada membership. A survey instrument containing mostly open-ended questions and two pages of definitions was pretested and revised. Accurate description was used to analyze and summarize the data with a minimum of interpretation.
Of 180 dietitians contacted, 151 (84%) completed interviews. The majority (n=91, 60%) of respondents thought health claims should be permitted on foods, but only with adequate scientific support for claims and government regulation. Participants overwhelmingly (n=122, 81%) felt that dietitians were the most appropriate professionals to recommend functional foods, but held mixed views of the appropriateness of having dietitians recommend nutraceuticals. However, according to a rating scale of 0 to 10, respondents across all areas of practice believed that it is extremely important for dietitians to become knowledgeable about nutraceuticals (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 9.0 +/- 1.2) and functional foods (mean +/- SD = 9.5 +/- 0.9).
Dietitians recommended strict legislation and close monitoring by government; unbiased scientific studies with consensus that the findings support health claims; partnerships with other health professionals, especially pharmacists; and opportunities to gain further knowledge.
PubMed ID
18783636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Concentrations of bisphenol A in the composite food samples from the 2008 Canadian total diet study in Quebec City and dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134088
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):791-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
X-L Cao
C. Perez-Locas
G. Dufresne
G. Clement
S. Popovic
F. Beraldin
R W Dabeka
M. Feeley
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Xu-Liang.Cao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):791-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Canada
Child
Cooking
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Surveys
Endocrine Disruptors - administration & dosage - analysis - isolation & purification
Fast Foods - analysis - standards
Female
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Food, Preserved - analysis - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis - standards
Legislation, Food
Male
Phenols - administration & dosage - analysis - isolation & purification
Quebec
Abstract
A total of 154 food composite samples from the 2008 total diet study in Quebec City were analysed for bisphenol A (BPA), and BPA was detected in less than half (36%, or 55 samples) of the samples tested. High concentrations of BPA were found mostly in the composite samples containing canned foods, with the highest BPA level being observed in canned fish (106 ng g(-1)), followed by canned corn (83.7 ng g(-1)), canned soups (22.2-44.4 ng g(-1)), canned baked beans (23.5 ng g(-1)), canned peas (16.8 ng g(-1)), canned evaporated milk (15.3 ng g(-1)), and canned luncheon meats (10.5 ng g(-1)). BPA levels in baby food composite samples were low, with 2.75 ng g(-1) in canned liquid infant formula, and 0.84-2.46 ng g(-1) in jarred baby foods. BPA was also detected in some foods that are not canned or in jars, such as yeast (8.52 ng g(-1)), baking powder (0.64 ng g(-1)), some cheeses (0.68-2.24 ng g(-1)), breads and some cereals (0.40-1.73 ng g(-1)), and fast foods (1.1-10.9 ng g(-1)). Dietary intakes of BPA were low for all age-sex groups, with 0.17-0.33 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for infants, 0.082-0.23 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children aged from 1 to 19 years, and 0.052-0.081 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for adults, well below the established regulatory limits. BPA intakes from 19 of the 55 samples account for more than 95% of the total dietary intakes, and most of the 19 samples were either canned or in jars. Intakes of BPA from non-canned foods are low.
Notes
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2001 Jan;18(1):69-7511212549
Cites: J Nutr. 2001 Feb;131(2):409S-20S11160571
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2002 Aug;19(8):796-80212227943
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2003 Jun;20(6):596-60612881134
Cites: J AOAC Int. 1993 Jan-Feb;76(1):14-258448438
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2005 Jan;22(1):65-7215895613
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(21-22):1327-3520077204
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Mar 26;56(6):2041-718284199
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Sep 10;56(17):7919-2418702469
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2009 Feb;47(2):506-1019121362
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Feb 25;57(4):1307-1119170636
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jun 24;57(12):5345-5119459630
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2007 Jan;24(1):103-1217164221
PubMed ID
21623504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumer responses to communication about food risk management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160751
Source
Appetite. 2008 Mar-May;50(2-3):340-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heleen van Dijk
Julie Houghton
Ellen van Kleef
Ivo van der Lans
Gene Rowe
Lynn Frewer
Author Affiliation
Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands. Heleen.vanDijk@wur.nl
Source
Appetite. 2008 Mar-May;50(2-3):340-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Consumer Product Safety
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Food, Genetically Modified
Germany
Great Britain
Greece
Humans
Legislation, Food
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mycotoxins - analysis
Norway
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Risk assessment
Risk Management
Abstract
Recent emphasis within policy circles has been on transparent communication with consumers about food risk management decisions and practices. As a consequence, it is important to develop best practice regarding communication with the public about how food risks are managed. In the current study, the provision of information about regulatory enforcement, proactive risk management, scientific uncertainty and risk variability were manipulated in an experiment designed to examine their impact on consumer perceptions of food risk management quality. In order to compare consumer reactions across different cases, three food hazards were selected (mycotoxins on organically grown food, pesticide residues, and a genetically modified potato). Data were collected from representative samples of consumers in Germany, Greece, Norway and the UK. Scores on the "perceived food risk management quality" scale were subjected to a repeated-measures mixed linear model. Analysis points to a number of important findings, including the existence of cultural variation regarding the impact of risk communication strategies-something which has obvious implications for pan-European risk communication approaches. For example, while communication of uncertainty had a positive impact in Germany, it had a negative impact in the UK and Norway. Results also indicate that food risk managers should inform the public about enforcement of safety laws when communicating scientific uncertainty associated with risks. This has implications for the coordination of risk communication strategies between risk assessment and risk management organizations.
PubMed ID
17945386 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mandatory folic acid fortification in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161563
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2007;68(3):143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Barbara V Roebothan
Joy Carmichael
Valerie Barter
Jane Aucoin
Madonna Murphy
Author Affiliation
Deivision of Community Health, Memorial University, St. John's, NL.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2007;68(3):143-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food, Fortified
Humans
Legislation, Food
Male
Neural Tube Defects - prevention & control
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Abstract
Dietary folic acid (FA) intakes were analyzed in random samples of 302 young women (aged 18 to 34) and 337 seniors (aged 65 to 74) residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). The analyses were an attempt to estimate the amount of FA they would consume solely because of mandatory fortification of foods.
Secondary analysis was performed on raw data collected through single 24-hour recalls as part of a larger study.
The dietary FA contributed by fortified foods eaten in the specified amounts was estimated to be 136 to 148 mcg/day (226 to 247 DFE/day) for young women and 151 to 160 mcg/day (252 to 267 DFE/day) for seniors. Most of this FA was contributed to the diet by enriched white flour.
Mandatory fortification of foods appears to have improved the total mean intake of folate by young women and seniors residing in NL.
PubMed ID
17784973 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Safety of food supplements containing plant components].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172167
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(4):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
V G Kukes
V M Bulaev
D A Sychev
E V Shikh
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(4):22-6
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dietary Supplements
Drug Interactions
Drug Labeling
Female
Food Additives - adverse effects
Food-Drug Interactions
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Legislation, Food
Male
Plant Structures - adverse effects
Plants, Medicinal - adverse effects
Russia
Safety
Abstract
For today the biologically active additives (BAA) extensively use by people as a source essential substances. However majoriry of people don't know, that BAA which contain vegetable components may induces various undiserable effects (UE). Review contain information about frequency of serious UE, first of all induced BAA, which contain medicinal plants. Discussed problem of charge efficacy and safety drugs when its use jointly with BAA. Think that need to give in BAA instruction additional information about possibility UE BAA.
PubMed ID
16265911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Survey of current vitamin D food fortification practices in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119420
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mona S Calvo
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, 8301 Muirkirk Road, Laurel, MD 20708, USA. mona.calvo@fda.hhs.gov
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:211-3
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Food, Fortified
Humans
Legislation, Food - trends
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Widespread poor vitamin D status in all age and gender groups in the United States (USA) and Canada increases the need for new food sources. Currently ~60% of the intake of vitamin D from foods is from fortified foods in these countries. Those groups in greatest need are consuming significantly lower amounts of commonly fortified foods such as milk. Both countries allow voluntary vitamin D fortification of some other foods, although in Canada this practice is only done on a case-by-case basis. Novel approaches to vitamin D fortification of food in both countries now include "bio-addition" in which food staples are fortified through the addition of another vitamin D-rich food to animal feed during production, or manipulation of food post-harvest or pre-processing. These bio-addition approaches provide a wider range of foods containing vitamin D, and thus appeal to differing preferences, cultures and possibly economic status. An example is the post-harvest exposure of edible mushrooms to ultraviolet light. However, further research into safety and efficacy of bio-addition needs to be established in different target populations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.
PubMed ID
23104118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thyroid nodules in an 11-year DanThyr follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266925
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Dec;99(12):4749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anne Krejbjerg
Lena Bjergved
Inge Bülow Pedersen
Nils Knudsen
Torben Jørgensen
Hans Perrild
Lars Ovesen
Lone Banke Rasmussen
Peter Laurberg
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Dec;99(12):4749-57
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food, Fortified
Humans
Incidence
Iodine
Legislation, Food
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sodium Chloride, Dietary
Thyroid Nodule - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
Limited longitudinal data are available on changes in the thyroid gland structure in a population and how this is influenced by iodine fortification (IF).
Our objective was to clarify how IF influenced thyroid gland structure in 2 regions with different iodine intake at baseline (Copenhagen, mild iodine deficiency [ID]; Aalborg, moderate ID).
We conducted a longitudinal population-based study (DanThyr) where participants were examined before (1997) and after (2008) the Danish mandatory IF of salt (2000).
We examined 2465 adults, and ultrasonography was performed by the same sonographers using the same equipment, after controlling performances.
Change in thyroid gland structure was evaluated.
The follow-up period saw an increased prevalence of multinodularity (9.8%-13.8 %, P
PubMed ID
25233154 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin B-12 and homocysteine status in a folate-replete population: results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131488
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Oct;94(4):1079-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Amanda J MacFarlane
Linda S Greene-Finestone
Yipu Shi
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada. amanda.macfarlane@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Oct;94(4):1079-87
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Erythrocytes
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Folic Acid Deficiency - epidemiology - prevention & control
Food, Fortified - analysis
Health Surveys
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Legislation, Food
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Obesity - complications
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency - blood - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Vitamin B-12 is an important cofactor required for nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Vitamin B-12 deficiency causes anemia and neurologic abnormalities-a cause for concern for the elderly, who are at increased risk of vitamin B-12 malabsorption. Vitamin B-12 deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects and hyperhomocysteinemia. The metabolism of vitamin B-12 and folate is interdependent, which makes it of public health interest to monitor biomarkers of vitamin B-12, folate, and homocysteine in a folic acid-fortified population.
The objective was to determine the vitamin B-12, folate, and homocysteine status of the Canadian population in the period after folic acid fortification was initiated.
Blood was collected from a nationally representative sample of ~5600 participants aged 6-79 y in the Canadian Health Measures Survey during 2007-2009 and was analyzed for serum vitamin B-12, red blood cell folate, and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy).
A total of 4.6% of Canadians were vitamin B-12 deficient (1090 nmol/L).
Approximately 5% of Canadians are vitamin B-12 deficient. One percent of adult Canadians have metabolic vitamin B-12 deficiency, as evidenced by combined vitamin B-12 deficiency and high tHcy status. In a folate-replete population, vitamin B-12 is a major determinant of tHcy.
PubMed ID
21900461 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.