Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Canadian dietitians' attitudes toward functional foods and nutraceuticals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155256
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Judy Sheeshka
Bonnie J Lacroix
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Data Collection
Dietary Supplements - standards
Dietetics - methods - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling
Health Food - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Sciences - education
Questionnaires
Safety
Abstract
A telephone survey was conducted to determine dietitians' views on nutraceuticals and functional foods.
Using systematic sampling with a random start, 238 names were drawn from the Dietitians of Canada membership. A survey instrument containing mostly open-ended questions and two pages of definitions was pretested and revised. Accurate description was used to analyze and summarize the data with a minimum of interpretation.
Of 180 dietitians contacted, 151 (84%) completed interviews. The majority (n=91, 60%) of respondents thought health claims should be permitted on foods, but only with adequate scientific support for claims and government regulation. Participants overwhelmingly (n=122, 81%) felt that dietitians were the most appropriate professionals to recommend functional foods, but held mixed views of the appropriateness of having dietitians recommend nutraceuticals. However, according to a rating scale of 0 to 10, respondents across all areas of practice believed that it is extremely important for dietitians to become knowledgeable about nutraceuticals (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 9.0 +/- 1.2) and functional foods (mean +/- SD = 9.5 +/- 0.9).
Dietitians recommended strict legislation and close monitoring by government; unbiased scientific studies with consensus that the findings support health claims; partnerships with other health professionals, especially pharmacists; and opportunities to gain further knowledge.
PubMed ID
18783636 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Weight of evidence needed to substantiate a health effect for probiotics and prebiotics: regulatory considerations in Canada, E.U., and U.S.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178600
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2005 Aug;44(5):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
M E Sanders
T. Tompkins
J T Heimbach
S. Kolida
Author Affiliation
Dairy and Food Culture Technologies, 7119 S. Glencoe Ct., Centennial (CO) 80122, USA. mes@mesanders.com
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2005 Aug;44(5):303-10
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Consumer Product Safety
Dietary Supplements
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Microbiology
Health Food - standards
Health promotion
Humans
Legislation, Food
Models, Animal
Probiotics
United States
Abstract
Successful and responsible introduction of probiotic and prebiotic products into the worldwide marketplace requires labelling for health benefits that meets consumer needs, adheres to regulatory standards and does not overextend scientific evidence. Regulations differ among countries, but underlying all is an emphasis on scientific credibility of any statements of health benefits. This paper considers the value of different types of evidence offered in substantiation of efficacy and reviews different regulatory approaches to labelling for health claims. Limitations of in vitro, animal and different types of human studies used for efficacy substantiation for probiotics and prebiotics are discussed.
PubMed ID
15338247 View in PubMed
Less detail