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66 records – page 1 of 7.

Acrylamide and cancer: tunnel leak in Sweden prompted studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19084
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002 Jun 19;94(12):876-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-2002

[Animal feeding and feed legislation after the detection of the first indigenous BSE cases in Germany].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188611
Source
Dtsch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Aug;109(8):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
J. Kamphues
Author Affiliation
Institut für Tierenährung, Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover.
Source
Dtsch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Aug;109(8):362-7
Date
Aug-2002
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - adverse effects - analysis - standards
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cattle
Disease Transmission, Infectious - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform - diagnosis - prevention & control
European Union
Food Contamination
Germany
Humans
Legislation, Food
Abstract
In Great Britain, even the earliest tangible signs indicating the epidemiologic significance of meat and bone meal in the spreading of BSE soon gave rise to increasingly rigorous legislative measures regulating animal feedstuffs. In 1994 a ban on the feeding of animal proteins to ruminants was implemented throughout the entire EU. But until the first BSE cases were actually confirmed in locally raised cattle (November 2000), feeding practice and legislation more or less in Germany remained unaffected by the efforts undertaken in Great Britain. This situation was suddenly changed on 1 December, 2000, when the so-called "Verfütterungsverbot" was put into effect, a law which drastically extended bans regarding the feedstuffs (including fishmeal and animal fats) as well as the species concerned (all animals used in food production). In 2001 the "contamination" phenomenon (ingredients of animal origin were detected in mixed feeds) became a vital issue for the feed industry; through the media, the subject "feedstuff safety" gained a previously unseen level of public awareness. Those circles concerned with mixed feed production and animal husbandry were increasingly confronted with the consequences of the "Verfütterungsverbot" (availability and pricing of substitute ingredients; the demand for amino acids and inorganic sources of phosphorus; problems finding adequate substitutes for animal fats; poor digestibility of alternative components such as indigenous legumes or vegetable fats in calf diets; lower utilization rate of original phosphorus in mixed feeds with negative consequences for skeletal development). With the conditional approval of fishmeal (except in feeds for ruminants) the situation has eased again to a certain degree; on the EU level there are increasing signals pointing toward a political intention to reinstate the utilization of by-products of slaughtered animals qualified for human consumption (with the exception of fallen/dead animals and specific risk material) in poultry and swine feeding. In Germany, at least, the question of animal fat utilization for food-producing animals is still unsolved.
PubMed ID
12224466 View in PubMed
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Application of laws, policies, and guidance from the United States and Canada to the regulation of food and feed derived from genetically modified crops: interpretation of composition data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108631
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2013
Author
William D Price
Lynne Underhill
Author Affiliation
12818 Wolfsville Road, Smithsburg, Maryland 21783, United States.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Date
Sep-4-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Canada
Food Analysis - methods
Food Safety - methods
Food, Genetically Modified
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Plants, Genetically Modified - chemistry
Risk assessment
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
With the development of recombinant DNA techniques for genetically modifying plants to exhibit beneficial traits, laws and regulations were adopted to ensure the safety of food and feed derived from such plants. This paper focuses on the regulation of genetically modified (GM) plants in Canada and the United States, with emphasis on the results of the compositional analysis routinely utilized as an indicator of possible unintended effects resulting from genetic modification. This work discusses the mandate of Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as well as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approach to regulating food and feed derived from GM plants. This work also addresses how publications by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and Codex Alimentarius fit, particularly with defining the importance and purpose of compositional analysis. The importance of study design, selection of comparators, use of literature, and commercial variety reference values is also discussed.
PubMed ID
23865444 View in PubMed
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Are taxes on fatty foods having their desired effects on health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119747
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e6885
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

[Biologically active food supplements: legislative and regulator basis. Report 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176364
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(6):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
B P Sukhanov
M G Kerimova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(6):40-2
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Deficiency Diseases - diet therapy
Dietary Supplements - history - standards
Energy intake
Food Additives - history - standards
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Legislation, Food
Licensure
Nutrition Disorders - diet therapy
Nutritive Value
Russia
Abstract
The article presents the history of food supplements' origin. The main requirements to them are given an account of the main legislative and normative documents, regulating the composition and considered as an important instrument for improving the structure and quality of nutrition of the population.
PubMed ID
15685859 View in PubMed
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[Board of Social Welfare, Institute for Public Health, Food Administration and Consumer Protection Department--what are all of you doing to control ineffective weight reducing products?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222710
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Nov 25;89(48):4132-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-1992

Canada's approach to functional foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127837
Source
Health Law Can. 2011 Nov;32(2):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Eileen McMahon
Teresa Reguly
Author Affiliation
Torys LLP, Canada.
Source
Health Law Can. 2011 Nov;32(2):29-34
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Functional Food
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Marketing - legislation & jurisprudence
Nutritive Value
PubMed ID
22259974 View in PubMed
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Canadian dietitians' attitudes toward functional foods and nutraceuticals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155256
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Judy Sheeshka
Bonnie J Lacroix
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):119-25
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Data Collection
Dietary Supplements - standards
Dietetics - methods - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling
Health Food - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Sciences - education
Questionnaires
Safety
Abstract
A telephone survey was conducted to determine dietitians' views on nutraceuticals and functional foods.
Using systematic sampling with a random start, 238 names were drawn from the Dietitians of Canada membership. A survey instrument containing mostly open-ended questions and two pages of definitions was pretested and revised. Accurate description was used to analyze and summarize the data with a minimum of interpretation.
Of 180 dietitians contacted, 151 (84%) completed interviews. The majority (n=91, 60%) of respondents thought health claims should be permitted on foods, but only with adequate scientific support for claims and government regulation. Participants overwhelmingly (n=122, 81%) felt that dietitians were the most appropriate professionals to recommend functional foods, but held mixed views of the appropriateness of having dietitians recommend nutraceuticals. However, according to a rating scale of 0 to 10, respondents across all areas of practice believed that it is extremely important for dietitians to become knowledgeable about nutraceuticals (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 9.0 +/- 1.2) and functional foods (mean +/- SD = 9.5 +/- 0.9).
Dietitians recommended strict legislation and close monitoring by government; unbiased scientific studies with consensus that the findings support health claims; partnerships with other health professionals, especially pharmacists; and opportunities to gain further knowledge.
PubMed ID
18783636 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Clin Pharmacol. 1986 Apr;26(4):232-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986

[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.