Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8397 records – page 1 of 840.

Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Mar 28;90(13):14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-1990

[2 women--2 parents. Interview by Lisbet Harstad.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59428
Source
Jordmorbladet. 1994;(5):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Feb 8;75(6):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-1978
Author
H. Sjövall
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Feb 8;75(6):428-33
Date
Feb-8-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Adolescent
Adult
Birth rate
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
628253 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3 physicians' prescriptions for narcotics criticized].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109253
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Dec 16;67(51):6014-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1970
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Dec 16;67(51):6014-5
Date
Dec-16-1970
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Prescriptions
Drug and Narcotic Control
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Narcotics
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
PubMed ID
5494327 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year follow-up of the National Cancer Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26835
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1984;38(6):282-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
P. Reizenstein
J. Pontèn
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1984;38(6):282-4
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Life Style
Neoplasms - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Sweden
United States
Abstract
No decade has seen as great advances as the 1970's in the understanding of cancer and in treatment results. The discovery of the role of oncogens, of some viruses, carcinogenic chemicals, and life-style in carcinogenesis and the increased cure rates in childhood tumors, leukemias, lymphomas, and breast and testicular carcinomas are some examples. The National Cancer Act must be credited for these advances to an appreciable degree.
PubMed ID
6525429 View in PubMed
Less detail

[10 years with HIV/AIDS. New dimensions in old ethical problems. Abolish compulsory testing, impose time-limit on isolation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8159
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 8;89(28-29):2458-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-1992
Author
O. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 8;89(28-29):2458-60
Date
Jul-8-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - psychology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Adult
Ethics, Medical
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Male
Patient Isolation - psychology
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1993 Sep 8;90(36):29498366718
PubMed ID
1507968 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 15-year national follow-up: legislation is not enough to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162773
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Alice Keski-Valkama
Eila Sailas
Markku Eronen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Jouko Lönnqvist
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa Hospital, PO Box 13, Vaasa, 65381 Finland. alice.keski-valkama@vvs.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Restraint, Physical - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Abstract
Seclusion and restraint are frequent but controversial coercive measures used in psychiatric treatment. Legislative efforts have started to emerge to control the use of these measures in many countries. In the present study, the nationwide trends in the use of seclusion and restraint were investigated in Finland over a 15-year span which was characterised by legislative changes aiming to clarify and restrict the use of these measures.
The data were collected during a predetermined week in 1990, 1991, 1994, 1998 and 2004, using a structured postal survey of Finnish psychiatric hospitals. The numbers of inpatients during the study weeks were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Register.
The total number of the secluded and restrained patients declined as did the number of all inpatients during the study weeks, but the risk of being secluded or restrained remained the same over time when compared to the first study year. The duration of the restraint incidents did not change, but the duration of seclusion increased. A regional variation was found in the use of coercive measures.
Legislative changes solely cannot reduce the use of seclusion and restraint or change the prevailing treatment cultures connected with these measures. The use of seclusion and restraint should be vigilantly monitored and ethical questions should be under continuous scrutiny.
PubMed ID
17598058 View in PubMed
Less detail

[20th century medical debate over venereal disease and prostitution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191749
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):29-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Lundberg
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):29-44
Date
2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Prostitution - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - history
Social Welfare - history
Societies, Medical - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
Women's Rights - history
Abstract
In the early twentieth century a wider debate took place about how Swedish society was to fight the spread of contagious venereal diseases and in 1910 a government committee had written a law proposal that would dramatically reform these measures previously, Swedish physicians had been united against any measures against these diseases that did not involve the regulation of prostitutes, but this consensus was slowly withering away in the early parts of the century. Female doctors and a younger generation of venereologists was drawing the conclusion that mandatory checks of only one out of two sexes was insufficient. This article reviews the debate regarding the regulation of prostitution that took place between conservative and liberal members in the Swedish Medical Association in 1911. It depicts a fierce discussion between members that still clung to nineteenth-century ideas of women as being prone to prostitution if left idle and unemployed, and liberal members that believed social injustices such as low wages laid behind women's decisions. The study gives an insight into the complexities of building the Swedish welfare state.
PubMed ID
11817395 View in PubMed
Less detail

8397 records – page 1 of 840.