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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Conservatorship and the severely mentally ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220596
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Aug;150(8):1278
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
T. Zibin
D. Hunks
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Aug;150(8):1278
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Humans
Legal Guardians - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Notes
Comment On: Am J Psychiatry. 1992 Jul;149(7):909-131609870
PubMed ID
8328590 View in PubMed
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[Dementia--nursing home accommodation without public security. Interview by Kirsten Bjørnsson].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207290
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1997 Sep 5;97(36):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1997

Elderly patients as a vulnerable category of the population requiring special legal protection with respect to the provision of medical care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157574
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2007 Dec;14(4):349-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007

European Court of Human Rights. ECHR 2013/21. Case of Dmitriy Ryabov v. Russia, 1 August 2013, no. 33774/08 (first section).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105237
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2013 Dec;20(5):494-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Joseph Dute
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Health Law. 2013 Dec;20(5):494-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence
Child of Impaired Parents - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Legal Guardians - legislation & jurisprudence
Male
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
PubMed ID
24437335 View in PubMed
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Normativity, guardianship, and the elderly. Some lessons from Canadian legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201187
Source
Theor Med Bioeth. 1999 Jan;20(1):69-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L Y Landry
Author Affiliation
Philosophy Department, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.
Source
Theor Med Bioeth. 1999 Jan;20(1):69-84
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Humans
Legal Guardians - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment
Abstract
The concept of guardianship, its associated principles, distinctions, and articulation of the legal needs of the elderly are introduced via a review of well-canvassed criticisms of Canadian guardianship legislation. Claims that the reformed legislation of Alberta, Quebec, and British Columbia represent models of adequate adult guardianship compared with traditional (archaic lunacy) law are examined. This paper argues that these renovated models exhibit a dubious normative advance over traditional legislation. Specifically, the normative presuppositions of the reformed legislation, such as, restriction to an autonomy-paternalism framework, and the norms of the liberal individual and state, obscure important issues in at least two key areas which challenge the models' assumptions; namely, assessment and legal competence and assessment and need. The development of guardianship laws and of social arrangements that are more responsive to the life experiences of the elderly requires critical re-articulation of the nature of individuals and their communities.
PubMed ID
10442055 View in PubMed
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To protect and to support: How citizenship and self-determination are legally constructed and managed in practice for people living with dementia in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279612
Source
Dementia (London). 2016 May;15(3):343-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Ann-Charlotte Nedlund
Annika Taghizadeh Larsson
Source
Dementia (London). 2016 May;15(3):343-57
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Dementia - psychology
Humans
Legal Guardians - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Personal Autonomy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Since living with dementia implies increasing difficulties in taking charge of rights due to cognitive as well as communicative impairments, many people with dementia are vulnerable and in need of support in order to realize full citizenship. In Sweden, all adults right to self-determination is strongly emphasized in law, regulations, and policies. Further, and in contrast to the situation in many other countries, people living with dementia cannot be declared as incompetent of making decisions concerning social care and their right to self-determination cannot legally be taken away. The article shows that in the Swedish welfare system, the focus is more on protecting the self-determination of citizens than on supporting people in making decisions and exercising citizenship. Subsequently, this causes legally constructed zones of inclusion and exclusion. This article examines and problematizes how different institutional contexts, legal constructions, norms, and practices in Sweden affect the management of issues concerning guardianship, supported decision-making and self-determination, and outline the implications for people living with dementia.
PubMed ID
27170586 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.