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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1978;67(2):58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
S. Orava
J. Puranen
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1978;67(2):58-65
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - etiology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Foot Injuries
Humans
Knee Injuries - etiology - therapy
Leg Injuries - etiology - therapy
Male
Physical Exertion
Sex Factors
Abstract
Over a period of three years 829 cases of greater than or equal to 16-year-old athlete exertion injuries and syndromes were collected. There were 75 women and 754 men in the series. About 90% of the athletes had been training regularly for more than two years, and 75% of them trained 6 times a week or more. Approximately 52% of the injuries occurred in track and field athletics, about 17% in ball events, 13.6% in skiing, 7.4% in orienteering, and 4.7% in power events. Other sports were associated with fewer exertion injuries. 28.7% of the conditions occurred in the knee, 17% in the ankle, foot and heel, 14.8% in the leg, 8.2% in the back and trunk, 8.1% in the thigh, 7.4% in the achilles tendon. The rest were in the shoulder, neck and upper extremities. In 92% of the patients conservative treatment and rest were used. Only 8% of the cases were treated surgically.
PubMed ID
28065 View in PubMed
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The diagnostic and prognostic value of ultrasonography in soccer players with acute hamstring injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257420
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2014 Feb;42(2):399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Jesper Petersen
Kristian Thorborg
Michael Bachmann Nielsen
Thomas Skjødt
Lars Bolvig
Niels Bang
Per Hölmich
Author Affiliation
Jesper Petersen, Amager Hospital, Arthroscopic Centre Amager, Italiensvej 1, Copenhagen S, Denmark, DK-2300. jesper.petersen@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2014 Feb;42(2):399-404
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Denmark
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Leg Injuries - etiology - ultrasonography
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - injuries
Physical Examination
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Recurrence
Soccer - injuries
Thigh
Young Adult
Abstract
An injury to the hamstring muscle complex is the most common injury in soccer. Ultrasound of acute hamstring injuries is often used as a clinical tool for diagnosing hamstring injuries and guiding players in when they can return to play.
To (1) investigate the characteristic sonographic findings of acute hamstring injuries in soccer players, (2) compare the mean injury severity (time to return to play) in injured players with and without sonographically verified abnormalities, and (3) correlate the length of the injured area and absence from soccer play (time to return to play) to investigate if ultrasonography can be used as a prognostic indicator of time to return to play.
Case series; Level of evidence, 4.
Players from 50 teams participating in 1 of the top 5 Danish soccer divisions were followed in the period from January to December 2008. Of 67 players with acute hamstring injuries, 51 underwent ultrasonographic examination of the injured thigh and were included in this study.
Ultrasonographic examinations were performed 1 to 10 days after injury (mean, 5.2 ± 3.0 days), and sonographic findings were present in 31 of 51 cases (61%). Two thirds of the injuries were to the biceps femoris muscle and one third to the semitendinosus muscle. No total ruptures were documented. The 51 acute hamstring injuries resulted in absence from soccer of a mean 25.4 ± 15.7 days per injury, with no significant difference between players with and without sonographically verified abnormalities (P = .41). No correlation existed between the length of the injured area and injury severity (r = 0.19, P = .29).
The biceps femoris is the most commonly injured hamstring muscle detected by ultrasound, and more than half of the injuries are intramuscular. Because neither the presence of sonographic findings nor the size of the findings was correlated with time to return to play in injured soccer players, the prognosis of hamstring injuries should not be guided by these findings alone.
PubMed ID
24335495 View in PubMed
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Injuries associated with strenuous road marching.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6305
Source
Mil Med. 1992 Feb;157(2):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Knapik
K. Reynolds
J. Staab
J A Vogel
B. Jones
Author Affiliation
Occupational Medicine Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760.
Source
Mil Med. 1992 Feb;157(2):64-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Back Injuries
Exertion
Humans
Leg Injuries - etiology
Male
Military Personnel
United States
Walking
Wounds and Injuries - etiology
Abstract
Injuries were recorded during and up to 12 days after a maximal effort road march. Light infantry soldiers (N = 335) carried a total load of 46 kg over a 20 km course. Twenty-four percent of the soldiers suffered one or more injuries, resulting in 44 days of limited duty. All injuries involved the lower extremities and/or the back. Foot blisters and back problems were the most common complaints (35% and 23%, respectively, of the total injuries). These data indicate that units without recent road marching training can expect a high incidence of injuries as a result of a single demanding road march.
PubMed ID
1603388 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Oct 9;42(18):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1975
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Oct 9;42(18):47-8
Date
Oct-9-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Casts, Surgical
Female
Humans
Jurisprudence
Leg Injuries - etiology
Middle Aged
Skin - injuries
Sweden
PubMed ID
1043421 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 May 21;116(10):1151-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-21-1977
Author
R M Letts
A. Mardirosian
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 May 21;116(10):1151-3
Date
May-21-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Age Factors
Amputation, Traumatic
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Foot Injuries
Humans
Leg Injuries - etiology
Male
Manitoba
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Over an 8-year period 31 children in the Winnipeg area were admitted to hospital with lawnmower injuries. The accidents were always preventable and were caused by patient or parent carelessness. The wounds were severe, often resulting in amputation of a portion of an extremity. Infection was common; prophylaxis with a broad-spectrum antibiotic and human antitetanus globulin is recommended. Radiography, débridement of the wound with thorough exploration under general anesthesia, and defatting and reapplication of degloved skin should be done initially, then the wound should be reinspected and redressed at 2 to 3 days, and finally closed or skin grafted at 6 to 8 days. Children must be educated about the dangers of lawnmowers and prevented from riding on tractor mowers. The grass catcher should be used and the path cleared of missiles. Hand controls should be mounted on the mower's handle and the blade should be kept sharp so that the machine's speed can be reduced.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Aug 21;115(4):298953895
PubMed ID
16692 View in PubMed
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[Patterns of injury and socioeconomic consequences of injuries sustained in slalom and long-distance skiing]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39618
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 Jan 28;147(5):436-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1985

[Snow-boarding injuries can be prevented].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213595
Source
Nord Med. 1996 Jan;111(1):7-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
J. Björnstig
U. Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Olycksanalysgruppen, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Nord Med. 1996 Jan;111(1):7-9
Date
Jan-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Leg Injuries - etiology
Male
Protective Clothing
Skiing - injuries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The last four winter seasons have witnessed a dramatic increase in the popularity of snowboarding. A series of snowboarding injuries treated at University Hospital, Umeå, predominantly consisted of those sustained by teenage boys, often when jumping or losing balance for other reasons. The upper extremities were the most common sites of injury, 2/3 of these injuries being fractures. The commonest type of lower extremity injury was sprain, and 2/3 of lower extremity injuries affected the foremost leg. To prevent injuries, it is recommended that snowboard bindings should be modified by the introduction of some sort of release mechanism, and enthusiasts should be urged to attend a training course, to use soft-shell footwear and to wear gloves with reinforcement protecting the hand and wrist.
PubMed ID
8570408 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.