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1242 records – page 1 of 125.

Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266326
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Lena German Millberg
Linda Berg
Elisabeth Björk Brämberg
Gun Nordström
Joakim Ohlén
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.
PubMed ID
25240945 View in PubMed
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Academic skills in children with early-onset type 1 diabetes: the effects of diabetes-related risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124345
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Riitta Hannonen
Jorma Komulainen
Raili Riikonen
Timo Ahonen
Kenneth Eklund
Asko Tolvanen
Päivi Keskinen
Anja Nuuja
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Neurology, Kymenlaakso Central Hospital, Carea, Kotkantie 41, Kotka, Finland. riitta.hannonen@carea.fi
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Learning Disorders - diagnosis
Male
Mathematics
Risk factors
Abstract
The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia,on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9 y 11 mo,SD 4 mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40 females, 52 males;mean age 9 y 9 mo,SD 3 mo). Children were included if T1DM had been diagnosed before the age of 5 years and if they were aged between 9 and 10 years at the time of study. Children were not included if their native language was not Finnish and if they had a diagnosed neurological disorder that affected their cognitive development. Among the T1DM group, 37 had and 26 had not experienced severe hypoglycaemia and 26 had avoided severe hypoglycaemia. Severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA), and glycaemic control were used as T1DM-related factors. Task performance in reading, spelling, and mathematics was compared among the three groups, and the effects of the T1DM-related factors were analysed with general linear models.
The groups with (p
Notes
Comment In: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):393-422590722
PubMed ID
22590723 View in PubMed
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[Acclimatization of relocated children and adolescents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38186
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
I. Moilanen
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Kinderklinik, Universität Oulu, Finnland.
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Date
Mar-1989
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Child
Child Reactive Disorders - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Finland
Humans
Learning Disorders - psychology
Male
Personality Development
Psychological Tests
Self Concept
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The effects of return migration on emotional well-being were studied in those school-aged children and adolescents who had returned to northern Finland from Sweden during 1984 and 1985. Each of the 320 returning children and adolescents was assigned a control from the same class at school, matched for age and sex, who had not emigrated. According to a parent questionnaire, the returning boys were irritable more often than the control boys, and they also scored higher on the self-report scale "Children's Depression Inventory." In the teachers' evaluations (Rutter B2 Scale), the returning boys had psychiatric disorders more often than their controls. For both returning boys and girls, overall scholastic achievement was poorer than in the controls, but performance in foreign languages (mainly English) was better. If the father was absent from the family, this was reflected in the scholastic achievement and emotional well-being of both the returnees and the control subjects. How well the children coped with their return to Finland was also affected by what the language of instruction had been in Sweden, whether there had been a language change upon returning to Finland and how much mental preparation there had been for moving.
PubMed ID
2728619 View in PubMed
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[Achieving the optimal functional state in younger schoolchildren by alternating their posture in the classroom]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38363
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Nov;(11):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

[A clinical skills training program--a structured, accelerated introduction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179455
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2004
Author
Lisbet Isenberg Ravn
Claus M Lund
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Anaestesiologisk Afdeling. lisbet.ravn@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Date
May-17-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods - standards
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - standards
Learning
Motivation
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
15222077 View in PubMed
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[A controlled study of the short-term and long-term effects of a "train the trainers" course--secondary publication].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154394
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2008
Author
Sune Rubak
Lene Mortensen
Charlotte Ringsted
Bente Malling
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Skejby, Paediatrisk Afdeling, Viborg Hospital, Medicinsk Afdeling, og Aarhus Universitet, Center for Medicinsk Uddannelse. sr@alm.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Date
Oct-27-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Feedback
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Learning
Orthopedics - education
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
Abstract
This is an intervention-study discussing the long-term effects of a 3-day "Train the trainers course" (TTC). In the intervention (I) group 98.4% of doctors participated in a TTC, both specialists and trainees. Knowledge about teaching skills increased in the I group by 25% after the TTC; a result which was sustained at six months. Teaching behaviour was significantly changed as the use of feedback and supervision had increased from a score of 4 to 6 (max. score = 9).
A 3-day residential TTC has a significant impact on knowledge gain concerning teaching skills, teaching behaviour and clinical learning culture after six months.
PubMed ID
18985941 View in PubMed
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Acquisition of locative utterances in Norwegian: structure-building via lexical learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299505
Source
J Child Lang. 2018 07; 45(4):981-1005
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Natalia Mitrofanova
Marit Westergaard
Author Affiliation
UiT - The Arctic University of Norway,Norway.
Source
J Child Lang. 2018 07; 45(4):981-1005
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language
Language Development
Learning
Male
Norway
Phonetics
Russia
Semantics
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper focuses on the acquisition of locative prepositional phrases in L1 Norwegian. We report on two production experiments with children acquiring Norwegian as their first language and compare the results to similar experiments conducted with Russian children. The results of the experiments show that Norwegian children at age 2 regularly produce locative utterances lacking overt prepositions, with the rate of preposition omission decreasing significantly by age 3. Furthermore, our results suggest that phonologically strong and semantically unambiguous locative items appear earlier in Norwegian children's utterances than their phonologically weak and semantically ambiguous counterparts. This conclusion is confirmed by a corpus study. We argue that our results are best captured by the Underspecified P Hypothesis (UPH; Mitrofanova, 2017), which assumes that, at early stages of grammatical development, the underlying structure of locative utterances is underspecified, with more complex functional representations emerging gradually based on the input. This approach predicts that the rate of acquisition in the domain of locative PPs should be influenced by the lexical properties of individual language-specific grammatical elements (such as frequency, morphological complexity, phonological salience, or semantic ambiguity). Our data from child Norwegian show that this prediction is borne out. Specifically, the results of our study suggest that phonologically more salient and semantically unambiguous items are mastered earlier than their ambiguous and phonologically less salient counterparts, despite the higher frequency of the latter in the input (Clahsen et al., 1996).
PubMed ID
29540246 View in PubMed
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The acquisition of past tense morphology in Icelandic and Norwegian children: an experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33023
Source
J Child Lang. 1999 Oct;26(3):577-618
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
H. Ragnarsdóttir
H G Simonsen
K. Plunkett
Author Affiliation
Iceland University of Education.
Source
J Child Lang. 1999 Oct;26(3):577-618
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Iceland
Language
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Verbal Learning
Abstract
Icelandic and Norwegian past tense morphology contain strong patterns of inflection and two weak patterns of inflection. We report the results of an elicitation task that tests Icelandic and Norwegian children's knowledge of the past tense forms of a representative sample of verbs. This cross-sectional study of four-, six- and eight-year-old Icelandic (n = 92) and Norwegian (n = 96) children systematically manipulates verb characteristics such as type frequency, token frequency and phonological coherence--factors that are generally considered to have an important impact on the acquisition of inflectional morphology in other languages. Our findings confirm that these factors play an important role in the acquisition of Icelandic and Norwegian. In addition, the results indicate that the predominant source of errors in children shifts during the later stages of development from one weak verb class to the other. We conclude that these findings are consistent with the view that exemplar-based learning, whereby patterns of categorization and generalization are driven by similarity to known forms, appropriately characterizes the acquisition of inflectional systems by Icelandic and Norwegian children.
PubMed ID
10603697 View in PubMed
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The acquisition of personal pronouns in French-speaking and English-speaking children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208252
Source
J Child Lang. 1997 Jun;24(2):311-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P C Girouard
M. Ricard
T G Décarie
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
J Child Lang. 1997 Jun;24(2):311-26
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
France - ethnology
Humans
Language Development
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Speech Perception
Speech Production Measurement
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This paper presents a longitudinal study on the acquisition of first, second, and third person pronouns in twelve French-speaking and twelve English-speaking children. Comprehension and production data were collected every two months, beginning when the subjects were aged 1;6 and ending once pronouns were fully acquired. Three hypotheses concerning the rules children develop in learning pronouns were tested: (1) the person-role hypothesis (Charney, 1980), (2) the speech-role hypothesis (Clark, 1978), and (3) the name hypothesis (Clark, 1978). An analysis of children's pronominal confusion when they were addressed listeners as well as when they were non-addressed listeners was performed. The results indicated that the mastery of pronouns did not follow the developmental sequence predicted by the speech-role hypothesis; they provided evidence for the person-role hypothesis only when children were speakers, and partially supported the name hypothesis. The data also suggested that pronominal confusion is not a rare phenomenon among children tested in a non-addressee context. Finally, effects of child gender and native language were observed. Possible interpretations of the data discussed.
PubMed ID
9308420 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the German social-emotional learning programme Papilio in Finland: A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309271
Source
Int J Psychol. 2020 Jan; 55 Suppl 1:60-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Merja Koivula
Marja-Leena Laakso
Riitta Viitala
Marita Neitola
Markus Hess
Herbert Scheithauer
Author Affiliation
University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2020 Jan; 55 Suppl 1:60-69
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland
Germany
Humans
Learning - physiology
Male
Pilot Projects
Social Skills
Abstract
This study investigated the cross-national adaptation and implementation of Papilio, a German social-emotional learning programme, in Finnish early childhood education and care (ECEC) centres. Papilio is a developmentally focused, scientifically based intervention programme focused on preventing behavioural problems and fostering social-emotional competence in children aged 3-7. The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate the cross-national adaptation and cross-cultural adaptation and implementation of Papilio in the Finnish ECEC context. Results from qualitative interviews with one Finnish Papilio trainer, 11 early childhood education (ECE) teachers, two ECE special education teachers and two nursery nurses are supplemented with teachers' and nursery nurses' (N = 75) questionnaire data. Qualitative thematic analysis revealed that cultural adaptations were necessary on four levels: accommodation of materials, adaptation of the contents of the materials, structure and delivery. The materials and training contents were culturally adapted, whereas the delivery of the intervention was adapted according to Finnish ECEC practices. The structural adaptation included discarding timeout, due to opposition by some educators. The educators were committed to implementing the programme as instructed and resolving the practical difficulties they encountered. Their motivation to implement Papilio increased as they observed improvements in the children's social-emotional competence during intervention.
PubMed ID
31452198 View in PubMed
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1242 records – page 1 of 125.