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1170 records – page 1 of 117.

Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266326
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Lena German Millberg
Linda Berg
Elisabeth Björk Brämberg
Gun Nordström
Joakim Ohlén
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.
PubMed ID
25240945 View in PubMed
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Academic skills in children with early-onset type 1 diabetes: the effects of diabetes-related risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124345
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Riitta Hannonen
Jorma Komulainen
Raili Riikonen
Timo Ahonen
Kenneth Eklund
Asko Tolvanen
Päivi Keskinen
Anja Nuuja
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Neurology, Kymenlaakso Central Hospital, Carea, Kotkantie 41, Kotka, Finland. riitta.hannonen@carea.fi
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):457-63
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Hypoglycemia - diagnosis
Learning Disorders - diagnosis
Male
Mathematics
Risk factors
Abstract
The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia,on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9 y 11 mo,SD 4 mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40 females, 52 males;mean age 9 y 9 mo,SD 3 mo). Children were included if T1DM had been diagnosed before the age of 5 years and if they were aged between 9 and 10 years at the time of study. Children were not included if their native language was not Finnish and if they had a diagnosed neurological disorder that affected their cognitive development. Among the T1DM group, 37 had and 26 had not experienced severe hypoglycaemia and 26 had avoided severe hypoglycaemia. Severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA), and glycaemic control were used as T1DM-related factors. Task performance in reading, spelling, and mathematics was compared among the three groups, and the effects of the T1DM-related factors were analysed with general linear models.
The groups with (p
Notes
Comment In: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 May;54(5):393-422590722
PubMed ID
22590723 View in PubMed
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[Acclimatization of relocated children and adolescents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38186
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
I. Moilanen
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Kinderklinik, Universität Oulu, Finnland.
Source
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr. 1989 Mar;17(1):10-6
Date
Mar-1989
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Child
Child Reactive Disorders - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Finland
Humans
Learning Disorders - psychology
Male
Personality Development
Psychological Tests
Self Concept
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The effects of return migration on emotional well-being were studied in those school-aged children and adolescents who had returned to northern Finland from Sweden during 1984 and 1985. Each of the 320 returning children and adolescents was assigned a control from the same class at school, matched for age and sex, who had not emigrated. According to a parent questionnaire, the returning boys were irritable more often than the control boys, and they also scored higher on the self-report scale "Children's Depression Inventory." In the teachers' evaluations (Rutter B2 Scale), the returning boys had psychiatric disorders more often than their controls. For both returning boys and girls, overall scholastic achievement was poorer than in the controls, but performance in foreign languages (mainly English) was better. If the father was absent from the family, this was reflected in the scholastic achievement and emotional well-being of both the returnees and the control subjects. How well the children coped with their return to Finland was also affected by what the language of instruction had been in Sweden, whether there had been a language change upon returning to Finland and how much mental preparation there had been for moving.
PubMed ID
2728619 View in PubMed
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[Achieving the optimal functional state in younger schoolchildren by alternating their posture in the classroom]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38363
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Nov;(11):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

[A clinical skills training program--a structured, accelerated introduction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179455
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2004
Author
Lisbet Isenberg Ravn
Claus M Lund
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Anaestesiologisk Afdeling. lisbet.ravn@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Date
May-17-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods - standards
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - standards
Learning
Motivation
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
15222077 View in PubMed
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[A controlled study of the short-term and long-term effects of a "train the trainers" course--secondary publication].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154394
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2008
Author
Sune Rubak
Lene Mortensen
Charlotte Ringsted
Bente Malling
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Skejby, Paediatrisk Afdeling, Viborg Hospital, Medicinsk Afdeling, og Aarhus Universitet, Center for Medicinsk Uddannelse. sr@alm.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Date
Oct-27-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Feedback
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Learning
Orthopedics - education
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
Abstract
This is an intervention-study discussing the long-term effects of a 3-day "Train the trainers course" (TTC). In the intervention (I) group 98.4% of doctors participated in a TTC, both specialists and trainees. Knowledge about teaching skills increased in the I group by 25% after the TTC; a result which was sustained at six months. Teaching behaviour was significantly changed as the use of feedback and supervision had increased from a score of 4 to 6 (max. score = 9).
A 3-day residential TTC has a significant impact on knowledge gain concerning teaching skills, teaching behaviour and clinical learning culture after six months.
PubMed ID
18985941 View in PubMed
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The acquisition of past tense morphology in Icelandic and Norwegian children: an experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33023
Source
J Child Lang. 1999 Oct;26(3):577-618
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
H. Ragnarsdóttir
H G Simonsen
K. Plunkett
Author Affiliation
Iceland University of Education.
Source
J Child Lang. 1999 Oct;26(3):577-618
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Iceland
Language
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Verbal Learning
Abstract
Icelandic and Norwegian past tense morphology contain strong patterns of inflection and two weak patterns of inflection. We report the results of an elicitation task that tests Icelandic and Norwegian children's knowledge of the past tense forms of a representative sample of verbs. This cross-sectional study of four-, six- and eight-year-old Icelandic (n = 92) and Norwegian (n = 96) children systematically manipulates verb characteristics such as type frequency, token frequency and phonological coherence--factors that are generally considered to have an important impact on the acquisition of inflectional morphology in other languages. Our findings confirm that these factors play an important role in the acquisition of Icelandic and Norwegian. In addition, the results indicate that the predominant source of errors in children shifts during the later stages of development from one weak verb class to the other. We conclude that these findings are consistent with the view that exemplar-based learning, whereby patterns of categorization and generalization are driven by similarity to known forms, appropriately characterizes the acquisition of inflectional systems by Icelandic and Norwegian children.
PubMed ID
10603697 View in PubMed
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The acquisition of personal pronouns in French-speaking and English-speaking children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208252
Source
J Child Lang. 1997 Jun;24(2):311-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P C Girouard
M. Ricard
T G Décarie
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
J Child Lang. 1997 Jun;24(2):311-26
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
France - ethnology
Humans
Language Development
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Speech Perception
Speech Production Measurement
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This paper presents a longitudinal study on the acquisition of first, second, and third person pronouns in twelve French-speaking and twelve English-speaking children. Comprehension and production data were collected every two months, beginning when the subjects were aged 1;6 and ending once pronouns were fully acquired. Three hypotheses concerning the rules children develop in learning pronouns were tested: (1) the person-role hypothesis (Charney, 1980), (2) the speech-role hypothesis (Clark, 1978), and (3) the name hypothesis (Clark, 1978). An analysis of children's pronominal confusion when they were addressed listeners as well as when they were non-addressed listeners was performed. The results indicated that the mastery of pronouns did not follow the developmental sequence predicted by the speech-role hypothesis; they provided evidence for the person-role hypothesis only when children were speakers, and partially supported the name hypothesis. The data also suggested that pronominal confusion is not a rare phenomenon among children tested in a non-addressee context. Finally, effects of child gender and native language were observed. Possible interpretations of the data discussed.
PubMed ID
9308420 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280942
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Eva Öhman
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Päivi Kaila
Håkan Hult
Gunnar H Nilsson
Helena Salminen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Learning
Primary Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care.
In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument.
The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency.
CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in primary health care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27905932 View in PubMed
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Adapting to the context and learning from earlier experience: the implementation of a national breakthrough collaborative in the context of social services in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147789
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2009 Oct-Dec;18(4):231-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Josephine Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management & Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. josephine.lindgren@skl.se
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2009 Oct-Dec;18(4):231-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Social Work - methods - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
Although often used in health care settings as a method for continuous quality improvement, experience with the breakthrough collaborative in nonclinical health care settings is limited. In this article, we report pilot data from a social services collaborative conducted in 2007 to 2009 in Sweden, with special attention given to features of the implementation context that appeared to facilitate or hinder its success.
We used a case study approach to describe the processes used in the pilot project as well as to characterize the context. Our analysis was guided by a framework consisting of earlier identified factors for success including "motivate and empower the teams" and "ensure teams have measurable and achievable targets."
We observed several context-specific factors. These included measuring challenges connected to large cooperating teams. Specifically, teams representing different organizations needed more time to carry out a breakthrough collaborative than those in clinical health care settings. As in breakthrough collaboratives conducted in health care settings, early measurement efforts enabled a clearer sense of direction, which may have served to reinforce motivation among team members. This study highlights features that may have universal importance in influencing the success of breakthrough collaboratives to improve the quality of social services.
PubMed ID
19851230 View in PubMed
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1170 records – page 1 of 117.