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888 records – page 1 of 89.

[1986 SHSTF Congress. I venture before and take initiative].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236271
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal community-centered injury surveillance: a community-based participatory process evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129138
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mariana Brussoni
Lise L Olsen
Pamela Joshi
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research & Prevention Unit, L408 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada. mbrussoni@cw.bc.ca
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Population Surveillance
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
While injuries are a leading health concern for Aboriginal populations, injury rates and types vary substantially across bands. The uniqueness of Aboriginal communities highlights the importance of collecting community-level injury surveillance data to assist with identifying local injury patterns, setting priorities for action and evaluating programs. Secwepemc First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada, implemented the Injury Surveillance Project using the Aboriginal Community-Centered Injury Surveillance System. This paper presents findings from a community-based participatory process evaluation of the Injury Surveillance Project. Qualitative data collection methods were informed by OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession) principles and included focus groups, interviews and document review. Results focused on lessons learned through the planning, implementation and management of the Injury Surveillance Project identifying lessons related to: project leadership and staff, training, project funding, initial project outcomes, and community readiness. Key findings included the central importance of a community-based and paced approach guided by OCAP principles, the key role of leadership and project champions, and the strongly collaborative relationships between the project communities. Findings may assist with successful implementation of community-based health surveillance in other settings and with other health issues and illustrate another path to self-determination for Aboriginal communities. The evaluation methods represent an example of a collaborative community-driven approach guided by OCAP principles necessary for work with Aboriginal communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22138890 View in PubMed
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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Accreditation: a cultural control strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156493
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
André Paccioni
Claude Sicotte
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Centre of Interdisciplinary Research on Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Quebec, Canada. andre.paccioni@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Leadership
Longitudinal Studies
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and understand the effects of the accreditation process on organizational control and quality management practices in two Quebec primary-care health organizations.
A multiple-case longitudinal study was conducted taking a mixed qualitative/quantitative approach. An analytical model was developed of the effects of the accreditation process on the type of organizational control exercised and the quality management practices implemented. The data were collected through group interviews, semi-directed interviews of key informers, non-participant observations, a review of the literature, and structured questionnaires distributed to all the employees working in both institutions.
The accreditation process has fostered the implementation of consultation mechanisms in self-assessment teams. Improving assessments of client satisfaction was identified as a prime objective but, in terms of the values promoted in organizations, accreditation has little effect on the perceptions of employees not directly involved in the process. As long as not all staff members have integrated the basis for accreditation and its outcomes, the accreditation process appears to remain an external, bureaucratic control instrument.
This study provides a theoretical model for understanding organizational changes brought about by accreditation of primary services. Through self-assessment of professional values and standards, accreditation may foster better quality management practices.
PubMed ID
18578200 View in PubMed
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Acting at a disaster site: experiences expressed by Swedish nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210291
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
B O Suserud
H. Haljamäe
Author Affiliation
Borås University College of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disasters
Emergency Nursing - education
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Railroads
Sweden
Abstract
In a previous study the knowledge and views of nursing students on how they thought nurses, both in their professional role and as private persons, should act at a disaster site were evaluated. In the present study the practical functional role and experiences of nurses (n = 16) in two major disaster situations (one 'load and go' and one 'stay and play' type of emergency situation) were assessed from personal interviews along a standardized questionnaire. Nurses more routinely involved in emergency care and nurses with no or limited previous practical experience of disaster nursing were included in the study. Leadership-type actions, i.e. a systematic way of attempting to survey and to comprehend the situation, what has happened, and how many injured there may be at the site of the accident, were reported by most of the experienced nurses, while inexperienced nurses were involved mainly in the immediate care of injured according to directions given by more experienced members of the emergency team. Readiness for action, reflected by having a feeling of being prepared for work at the disaster site, was experienced more often by nurses with considerable previous experience of disaster nursing than by nurses with limited experience. Negative experiences, such as feelings of being insufficient, of unreality, mental strain, and problems in understanding the organization, were commonly mentioned by the inexperienced nurses. The present study stresses the importance, for all types of nurses, of more systematic training in disaster nursing.
PubMed ID
9004024 View in PubMed
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The activities and responsibilities of the vice chair for education in U.S. and Canadian departments of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123194
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica Brownfield
Benjamin Clyburn
Sally Santen
Gustavo Heudebert
Paul A Hemmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ebrownf@emory.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Canada
Education, Medical
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Leadership
Male
Organizational Objectives
Physician Executives
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A profile of the activities and responsibilities of vice chairs for education is notably absent from the medical education literature. The authors sought to determine the demographics, roles and responsibilities, and major priorities and challenges faced by vice chairs for education.
In 2010, the authors sent a confidential, Web-based survey to all 82 identified department of medicine vice chairs for education in the United States and Canada. The authors inquired about demographics, roles, expectations of and for their position, opinions on the responsibilities outlined for their position, metrics used to evaluate their success, top priorities, and job descriptions. Analysis included creating descriptive statistics and categorizing the qualitative comments.
Fifty-nine vice chairs for education (72%) responded. At the time of appointment, only 6 (10%) were given a job description, and only 17 (28%) had a defined job description and metrics used to evaluate their success. Only 20 (33%) had any formal budget management training, and 23 (38%) controlled an education budget. Five themes emerged regarding the responsibilities and goals of the vice chair for education: oversee educational programs; possess educational expertise; promote educational scholarship; serve in leadership activities; and, disturbingly, respondents found expectations to be vague and ill defined.
Vice chairs for education are departmental leaders. The authors' findings and recommendations can serve as a beginning for defining educational directions and resources, building consensus, and designing an appropriate educational infrastructure for departments of medicine.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):999-100122827983
PubMed ID
22722351 View in PubMed
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Actual clinical leadership: a shadowing study of charge nurses and doctors on-call in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298343
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-08-2019
Author
Sissel Eikeland Husebø
Øystein Evjen Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Quality and Health Technology, Faculty of Health Science, University of Stavanger, 4036, Stavanger, Norway. sissel.i.husebo@uis.no.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Date
Jan-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Nursing, Supervisory
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Abstract
The provision of safe, high quality healthcare in the Emergency Department (ED) requires frontline healthcare personnel with sufficient competence in clinical leadership. However, healthcare education curriculum infrequently features learning about clinical leadership, and there is an absence of experienced doctors and nurses as role models in EDs for younger and less experienced doctors and nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the activities performed by clinical leaders and to identify similarities and differences between the activities performed by charge nurses and those performed by doctors on-call in the Emergency Department after completion of a Clinical Leadership course.
A qualitative exploratory design was chosen. Nine clinical leaders in the ED were shadowed. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis.
The analysis revealed seven themes: receiving an overview of the team and patients and planning the shift; ensuring resources; monitoring and ensuring appropriate patient flow; monitoring and securing information flow; securing patient care and treatment; securing and assuring the quality of diagnosis and treatment of patient; and securing the prioritization of patients. The last two themes were exclusive to doctors on-call, while the theme "securing patient care and treatment" was exclusive to charge nurses.
Charge nurses and doctors on-call perform multitasking and complement each other as clinical leaders in the ED. The findings in this study provide new insights into how clinical leadership is performed by charge nurses and doctors on-call in the ED, but also the similarities and differences that exist in clinical leadership performance between the two professions. Clinical leadership is necessary to the provision of safe, high quality care and treatment for patients with acute health needs, as well as the coordination of healthcare services in the ED. More evaluation studies of this Clinical Leadership course would be valuable.
PubMed ID
30621752 View in PubMed
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888 records – page 1 of 89.