Skip header and navigation

Refine By

558 records – page 1 of 56.

(7)Be, (210)Pb, and (210)Po in the surface air from the Arctic to Antarctica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264944
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2014 Dec;138:364-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Bertil R R Persson
Elis Holm
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2014 Dec;138:364-74
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Beryllium - analysis
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis
Polonium - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Siberia
Abstract
In the present study we have investigated the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Po as well as (7)Be in surface air of the North and South Atlantic (1988-1989), the Arctic Ocean (1991), and along the coastline of Siberia (1994) during succeeding expeditions in the Swedish Polar Research program. During the cruises in the Arctic Ocean during 1991-07-28 to 1991-10-04 the average air concentrations of (7)Be was 0.6 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), (210)Pb 40 ± 4 µBq/m(3) and (210)Po-38 ± 10 µBq/m(3). During the Swedish-Russian Tundra Ecology-94 expedition along the Siberian coastline the average air concentrations of (7)Be and (210)Pb measured during May-July were 11 ± 3, and 2.4 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), and during July-September they were 7.2 ± 2 and 2.7 ± 1.1 mBq/m(3) respectively. The results from measurements of the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air over the Arctic Ocean vary between 75 and 176 µBq/m(3). In the air close to land masses, however, the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air increases to 269-2712 µBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (7)Be in the South Atlantic during the cruise down to Antarctica varied between 1.3 and 1.7 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.8 mBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Pb in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 6 and 14 µBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration recorded in November 1988 was 630 µBq/m(3) and in April 1989 it was 260 µBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Pb during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 290 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 230 µBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Po in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 15 and 58 µBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration in November 1988 was 170 and in April 1989 it was 70 µBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Po during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 63 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 60 µBq/m(3). The average of the activity concentrations in the Antarctic air of (210)Pb was 27 ± 10 µBq/m(3) and of (210)Po it was 12 ± 7 µBq/m(3). All our results were compiled together with other published data, and the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Pb was converted to total annual deposition (Bq/m(2)/a) and fitted to a 4th degree polynomial. By using the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Po/(210)Pb-activity ratio from our own results the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Po annual deposition was derived.
PubMed ID
24525181 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tuukka Turtiainen
Eila Kostiainen
Anja Hallikainen
Author Affiliation
STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. tuukka.turtiainen@stuk.fi
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cereals - chemistry - classification - metabolism
Data Collection
Female
Finland
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polonium - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Radiation monitoring
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
A survey was carried out on the activity concentrations of (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal grains produced in Finland. The cereal species were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), which account for 90% of the Finnish consumption of cereal products. The survey consisted of 18 flour and 13 unprocessed cereal samples and one hulled grain sample from 22 flour mills. According to the results, the mean (210)Pb/(210)Po concentrations in wheat grains, wheat flour, rye flour, oat grains and barley grains were 0.29, 0.12, 0.29, 0.36 and 0.36 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Combined with the consumption rates of the products, we assess that the mean effective doses from (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal products for the adult male and female population are 22 and 17 µSv per year, respectively.
PubMed ID
21035236 View in PubMed
Less detail

210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

Accumulated body burden and endogenous release of lead in employees of a lead smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209372
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
D E Fleming
D. Boulay
N S Richard
J P Robin
C L Gordon
C E Webber
D R Chettle
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Calcaneus - chemistry
Canada
Female
Humans
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure
Tibia - chemistry
Abstract
Bone lead levels for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers were measured in vivo by X-ray fluorescence in May-June 1994. The bone sites of study were the tibia and calcaneus; magnitudes of concentration were used to gauge lead body burden. Whole blood lead readings from the workers generated a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) that approximated the level of lead exposure over time. Blood lead values for 204 of the 381 workers were gathered from workers returning from a 10-month work interruption that ended in 1991; their blood level values were compared to their tibia and calcaneus lead levels. The resulting relations allowed constraints to be placed on the endogenous release of lead from bone in smelter works. Calcaneus lead levels were found to correlate strongly with those for tibia lead, and in a manner consistent with observations from other lead industry workers. Relations between bone lead concentration and CBLI demonstrated a distinctly nonlinear appearance. When the active population was divided by date of hire, a significant difference in the bone lead-CBLI slope emerged. After a correction to include the component of CBLI existing before the workers' employment at the smelter was made, this difference persisted. This implies that the transfer of lead from blood to bone in the workers has changed over time, possibly as a consequence of varying exposure conditions.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1975 May;32(2):119-391131339
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1996 May;29(5):440-58732917
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1983 Feb;40(1):51-76402004
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jun 9;308(23):1373-76188954
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1984 Aug;41(3):313-96378251
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1984;6(6):447-576517074
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1985 Mar;42(3):168-723970881
Cites: Environ Res. 1985 Apr;36(2):473-893979365
Cites: Phys Med Biol. 1985 Sep;30(9):929-434048276
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1988 Mar;45(3):174-813348993
Cites: Environ Res. 1988 Oct;47(1):79-943168967
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;43(6):381-913196073
Cites: Phys Med Biol. 1989 Dec;34(12):1833-452616639
Cites: Biol Trace Elem Res. 1990 Jul-Dec;26-27:407-141704744
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1991 Feb;91:33-72040248
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1991 Feb;91:49-552040251
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Jan;49(1):14-61733451
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(6):723-351805610
Cites: Environ Res. 1992 Apr;57(2):117-321568436
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Sep;49(9):631-441390269
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1993 Jan;118(1):16-298430422
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1993 May-Jun;48(3):147-568333784
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1993 Jul;50(7):637-418343425
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 19;271(3):197-2038277545
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Dec;101(7):598-6168143593
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jul 27;272(4):284-918028141
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Feb;102(2):172-78033846
Cites: Environ Res. 1995 May;69(2):75-828608773
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1981 Aug;38(3):209-176791682
PubMed ID
9105798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of lead (Pb) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) from a lake downstream a former shooting range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279581
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Espen Mariussen
Lene Sørlie Heier
Hans Christian Teien
Marit Nandrup Pettersen
Tor Fredrik Holth
Brit Salbu
Bjørn Olav Rosseland
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antimony - analysis
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Copper - analysis
Firearms
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gills - chemistry
Kidney - chemistry
Lakes
Lead - analysis
Norway
Sports
Trout - blood - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Zygote - chemistry - drug effects
Abstract
An environmental survey was performed in Lake Kyrtj?nn, a small lake within an abandoned shooting range in the south of Norway. In Lake Kyrtj?nn the total water concentrations of Pb (14?g/L), Cu (6.1?g/L) and Sb (1.3?g/L) were elevated compared to the nearby reference Lake Stitj?nn, where the total concentrations of Pb, Cu and Sb were 0.76, 1.8 and 0.12?g/L, respectively. Brown trout (Salmo trutta) from Lake Kyrtj?nn had very high levels of Pb in bone (104mg/kg w.w.), kidney (161mg/kg w.w.) and the gills (137mg/kg d.w), and a strong inhibition of the ALA-D enzyme activity were observed in the blood (24% of control). Dry fertilized brown trout eggs were placed in the small outlet streams from Lake Kyrtj?nn and the reference lake for 6 months, and the concentrations of Pb and Cu in eggs from the Lake Kyrtj?nn stream were significantly higher than in eggs from the reference. More than 90% of Pb accumulated in the egg shell, whereas more than 80% of the Cu and Zn accumulated in the egg interior. Pb in the lake sediments was elevated in the upper 2-5cm layer (410-2700mg/kg d.w), and was predominantly associated with redox sensitive fractions (e.g., organic materials, hydroxides) indicating low potential mobility and bioavailability of the deposited Pb. Only minor amounts of Cu and Sb were deposited in the sediments. The present work showed that the adult brown trout, as well as fertilized eggs and alevins, may be subjected to increased stress due to chronic exposure to Pb, whereas exposure to Cu, Zn and Sb were of less importance.
PubMed ID
27770648 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acid-base state of blood in pregnant rats after application of lead acetate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89837
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tkachenko T A
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):112-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Equilibrium - drug effects
Acidosis - blood - etiology - metabolism
Animals
Anoxia - blood - etiology - metabolism
Blood Gas Analysis
Female
Lead Poisoning - blood - complications - metabolism
Liver - embryology - metabolism
Organometallic Compounds - blood - pharmacokinetics - poisoning
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - metabolism
Rats
Abstract
It was shown that the increase of lead content in the blood, liver, placenta of female rats, rat embryo and embryo's liver (by 80.4; 30.9; 26.8; 18.2 and 22.7%, respectively) of rats poisoned by lead causes pH decrease in blood, reduction of HCO3- concentration, content of general CO2, level of pCO2 and pO2, that evidences for development of subcompensated metabolic acidosis. It was determined, that the poisoning of pregnant rats causes deep metabolic acidosis and hypoxia in their organisms that can result in the prenatal death of fetus.
PubMed ID
19248624 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acidic deposition and human exposure to toxic metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234401
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
B G Svensson
A. Björnham
A. Schütz
U. Lettevall
A. Nilsson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadmium - blood
Environmental Exposure
Health status
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lead - blood
Life Style
Mercury - blood
Metals - analysis - blood
Questionnaires
Selenium - blood
Sweden
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Acid precipitation affects the solubility of several metals in aquatic systems and in soil. Cadmium levels in tap water samples from geological areas having low resistance to acidic pollution were significantly higher than those in samples from a neighbouring reference area where there was a different geological structure. The median cadmium levels and pH values were 0.14 microgram l-1 and 5.6 respectively, for the acidic areas compared with 0.07 microgram l-1 and 6.4 respectively for the reference area. Further, there was a significant inverse relationship between both cadmium and lead contents and the pH values of the samples. The mobility of the metals was thus dependent on the acidity. The blood lead levels in 195 subjects from the acidic areas were lower than those in 91 subjects from the reference area (medians 60 vs. 70 micrograms l-1); no significant differences were found in blood cadmium or blood mercury levels. Subjects in the acidic areas had lower plasma selenium levels than those from the reference area (medians 85 vs. 90 micrograms l-1); the difference was mainly attributed to subjects with private wells. The data may indicate a negative effect of the acidic pollution on selenium intake via water and/or foods. There was also a positive relationship between intake of fish on the one hand and blood mercury and plasma selenium on the other, which is in accordance with the role of fish as a source of these metals.
PubMed ID
3438737 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative study of the morphofunctional changes in the thyroid of carp and rats as a result of being in an environment with an elevated lead level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210108
Source
Tsitologiia. 1997;39(1):5-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
G G Kornienko
A A Kozhin
Source
Tsitologiia. 1997;39(1):5-9
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carps - physiology
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Lead - adverse effects
Prevalence
Rats
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Thyroid Gland - drug effects - physiopathology
Urban Population
Abstract
It has been noticed that the morphofunctional organization of the thyroid gland is similar in representatives of two different classes of vertebrates: in fishes and in rats. Exposure of experimental animals to ecological factors with increased lead levels was followed by a phase response (activation, depression) of various structural elements of the thyroid gland. Obvious differences in morphofunctional mechanisms of adaptation to chemical stress factors in fishes and rats were found. A possible relationship is discussed between the environmental pollution with heavy metals and the increased incidence of thyroid gland disease in human population.
PubMed ID
9173625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activation of potassium channels in erythrocytes of marine teleost Scorpaena porcus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10059
Source
Membr Cell Biol. 2001;14(6):773-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Y A Silkin
E N Silkina
A O Sherstobitov
G P Gusev
Author Affiliation
Karadag Natural Reserve, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Feodosia, Crimean Region.
Source
Membr Cell Biol. 2001;14(6):773-82
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calcimycin - pharmacology
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Fishes - blood
Humans
In Vitro
Ion Transport - drug effects
Ionophores - pharmacology
Lead - pharmacology
Potassium - metabolism
Potassium Channels - blood
Propranolol - pharmacology
Sodium - metabolism
Vanadates - pharmacology
Abstract
To assess the possibility of stimulating Ca2+-activated K+ channels, marine fish erythrocytes were incubated at 20-22 degrees C in saline containing a Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor (orthovanadate), a Ca2+ ionophore (A23187), propranolol or Pb2+. Incubation of the cells for up to 2 h under control conditions or in the presence of 5 mM NH4VO3 and 1 mM Ca2+ did not affect the intracellular K+ and Na+ concentrations. About 50% cellular K+ was lost from erythrocytes incubated in the presence of 0.01 mM A23187, 1 mM EGTA and 0.4-1.0 mM Ca2+. There was a significant loss of cellular K+ after the addition of 0.05-0.2 mM propranolol to the incubation medium. The stimulatory effect of propranolol on the K+ efflux was independent of external Ca2+. Blockers of Ca2+ transport, verapamil and Co2+, caused only a small decrease in the K+ loss induced by propranolol. The treatment of erythrocytes with 1-2 microM Pb2+ led to a minor K+ loss, but at a Pb2+ concentration of 20-50 microM, about 70% cellular K+ was lost. The K+ efflux induced by propranolol or Pb2+ was completely blocked by 1 mM quinine. The induced K+ loss from the erythrocytes was accompanied by a slight increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration. These data indicate the possibility of inducing Ca2+- and Pb2+-activated potassium channels in erythrocytes of S. porcus. A distinctive feature of the cells is a high sensitivity to propranolol, which activates K+ channels in the absence of external Ca2+.
PubMed ID
11817573 View in PubMed
Less detail

558 records – page 1 of 56.