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27 records – page 1 of 3.

Analysis of enterotoxin production by Bacillus cereus from dairy products, food poisoning incidents and non-gastrointestinal infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75611
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P E Granum
S. Brynestad
J M Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Oslo.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 Feb;17(4):269-79
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacillus cereus - isolation & purification - metabolism - pathogenicity
Biological Assay - methods
Blotting, Western
Capillary Permeability - drug effects
Cold
Comparative Study
Dairy Products - microbiology - poisoning
Enterotoxins - analysis - biosynthesis
Evaluation Studies
Female
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - etiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests - methods
Male
Norway
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Of 85 strains of Bacillus cereus isolated in Norway from dairy products, 59% were found to be enterotoxigenic, and 15% were psychrotrophic. Six of the isolates (7%) were identified as potential psychrotrophic food-poisoning strains as they were both enterotoxigenic and exhibited good growth at 6 degrees C. Enterotoxin production was detected using the Western immunoblot technique, and a commercially available reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA) assay (Unipath BCET-RPLA TD950). Both methods gave essentially the same results. In a separate study, the Western immunoblot and RPLA assays were used in a conjunction with the in vivo vascular permeability reaction (VPR) assay to determine enterotoxin production among 25 isolates of Bacillus cereus referred to the PHLS Food Hygiene Laboratory from incidents of diarrhoeal- and emetic-syndrome food poisoning and non-gastrointestinal infections. Eighty-four percent of these isolates were found to be enterotoxigenic by the Western immunoblot and the RPLA assays, and these results were in good agreement with those obtained by the VPR assay. In both studies, the BCET-RPLA kit proved to be a simple and reliable means for determining enterotoxin production by strains of Bacillus cereus.
PubMed ID
8466800 View in PubMed
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Association between colonization with group B streptococci during pregnancy and preterm delivery among Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58666
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Feb;184(3):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
D R Feikin
P. Thorsen
S. Zywicki
M. Arpi
J G Westergaard
A. Schuchat
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, USA.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Feb;184(3):427-33
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Cervix Uteri - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Latex Fixation Tests
Multivariate Analysis
Obstetric Labor, Premature - microbiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy - microbiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcal Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Streptococcus agalactiae - isolation & purification
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We studied the relationship between group B streptococcal colonization and preterm delivery. STUDY DESIGN: In this prospective study at a single hospital in Odense, Denmark, cervicovaginal cultures were obtained at
PubMed ID
11228498 View in PubMed
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Association of bacteriuria and rheumatoid factors in a population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250291
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1977;6(1):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
K. Sievers
J. Takala
K. Aho
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1977;6(1):45-8
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacteriuria
Female
Finland
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Rheumatoid Factor - analysis
Abstract
To obtain further information on the possible association of bacteriuria and RFs on the population level, an epidemiological study was carried out among middle-aged women in a rural area. Fifty-five of ther 1223 women aged 40-64 years had bacteriuria and 31 were under treatment for urinary tract infection. The latex test was twice as often positive among the bacteriuria women as among the persons under treatment and the age-matched controls. The association was noted in the same way in persons with symptoms and signs suggestive of RA and in those with no evidence of this disease.
PubMed ID
850781 View in PubMed
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Changes in pneumococcal carriage prevalence and factors associated with carriage in Norwegian children, four years after introduction of PCV13.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307362
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jan 10; 20(1):29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-10-2020
Author
A Løvlie
D F Vestrheim
I S Aaberge
A Steens
Author Affiliation
Division for Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH), P.o.box 222 Skøyen, 0213, Oslo, Norway. Astrid.Louise.Lovlie@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jan 10; 20(1):29
Date
Jan-10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunization Programs - trends
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Infant
Latex Fixation Tests
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pneumococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Serogroup
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - therapeutic use
Abstract
Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage is often asymptomatic but can cause invasive pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal carriage is a prerequisite for disease, with children as main reservoir and transmitters. Childhood carriage can therefore be used to determine which serotypes circulate in the population and which may cause disease in the non-vaccinated population. In 2006, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced into the Norwegian Childhood Immunisation Programme, which was replaced by the more valent PCV13 in 2011. We investigated changes in pneumococcal carriage prevalence 4 years after switching to PCV13 compared to three previous surveys, and analysed factors associated with carriage in children.
We conducted a cross-sectional study in Norway, autumn 2015, among children attending day-care centres. We collected questionnaire data and nasopharyngeal swabs to identify pneumococcal serotypes. We compared the carriage prevalence in 2015 with surveys conducted in the same setting performed before widespread vaccination (2006; n?=?610), 2 years after PCV7 introduction (2008; n?=?600), and 2 years after switching to PCV13 (2013; n?=?874). Using multilevel logistic regression we determined the association between pneumococcal carriage and previously associated factors.
In 2015, 896 children participated, with age ranging from 8 to 80?months. The overall carriage prevalence was 48/100 children [95%CI 44-53] in 2015, 38% [29-46] lower than in 2006 pre-PCV7, and 23% [12-32] lower than in 2013, 2 years after switching to PCV13. The PCV13 carriage prevalence was 2.8/100 children [1.9-4.2] in 2015. Increasing age (p?
PubMed ID
31924177 View in PubMed
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[Immunity to tetanus among the population of the USSR. II. Immunity to tetanus in the population of the Vinnitsa region of the UkrSSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44231
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1969 Nov;46(11):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1969

Latex agglutination test for detection of Escherichia coli serotype O157.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230554
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Jul;27(7):1675-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
S B March
S. Ratnam
Author Affiliation
Newfoundland and Labrador Public Health Laboratory, St. John's, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Jul;27(7):1675-7
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests
Newfoundland and Labrador
Abstract
The value of a latex agglutination test (Escherichia coli O157 latex test; Oxoid Ltd.) for rapid presumptive detection of E. coli serotype O157:H7 was determined by laboratory trials and during an outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis. The latex test was found to be a simple, highly efficient and reliable test in detecting E. coli O157:H7 with 100% sensitivity and specificity. It was also found that sorbitol-MacConkey agar cultures were not as useful for food samples as they were for fecal specimens in screening for E. coli O157:H7, but the use of the latex screen was particularly efficient in this setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2671024 View in PubMed
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Mixed bacterial and viral infections are common in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38028
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Oct;8(10):683-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
J. Hietala
M. Uhari
H. Tuokko
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Oulu University, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Oct;8(10):683-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacterial Infections - complications - diagnosis
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Complement Fixation Tests
Female
Haemophilus Infections - complications - diagnosis
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infant
Latex Fixation Tests
Leukocyte Count
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology
Pneumococcal Infections - complications - diagnosis
Virus Diseases - complications - diagnosis
Abstract
Acute phase and convalescent sera from 51 pediatric patients who had a documented viral infection and no obvious culture-confirmed bacterial infection such as meningitis, otitis media or urinary tract infection were tested by enzyme immunoassay for antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis and by the latex agglutination test for pneumococcal antigens to evaluate the frequency of mixed bacterial and viral infections. A mixed bacterial and viral infection was documented in 19 patients (37%). Seven patients (14%) showed a diagnostic rise in antibodies to H. influenzae and 8 patients (16%) showed an antibody elevation to B. catarrhalis in their paired sera; pneumococcal antigen was detected in acute phase serum from 4 patients (8%). The rate of mixed infections in patients having respiratory symptoms was 52%. High serum C-reactive protein values and white blood cell counts were found significantly more often in those with mixed infections than in those who had viral infections. The results indicate that mixed bacterial and viral infections occur more frequently in children than one could anticipate on the basis of the earlier reports. Mixed bacterial and viral etiology is highly probable in a child who has a defined viral infection with high C-reactive protein and white blood cell count values, especially in the presence of respiratory symptoms.
PubMed ID
2510121 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiology of Clostridium perfringens related to food-borne outbreaks of disease in Finland from 1984 to 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189200
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 Aug;68(8):3744-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Elina Takkunen
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 Aug;68(8):3744-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Clostridium perfringens - classification - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Enterotoxins - genetics - metabolism
Finland - epidemiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Latex Fixation Tests - methods
Meat Products - microbiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
From 1975 to 1999, Clostridium perfringens caused 238 food-borne disease outbreaks in Finland, which is 20% of all such reported outbreaks during these years. The fact that C. perfringens is commonly found in human and animal stools and that it is also widespread in the environment is a disadvantage when one is searching for the specific cause of a food-borne infection by traditional methods. In order to strengthen the evidence-based diagnostics of food poisonings suspected to be caused by C. perfringens, we retrospectively investigated 47 C. perfringens isolates by PCR for the cpe gene, which encodes enterotoxin; by reversed passive latex agglutination to detect the enterotoxin production; and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to compare their genotypes after restriction of DNA by the enzymes SmaI and ApaI. The strains were isolated during 1984 to 1999 from nine food-borne outbreaks of disease originally reported as having been caused by C. perfringens. In seven of the nine outbreaks our results supported the fact that the cause was C. perfringens. Our findings emphasize the importance of a more detailed characterization of C. perfringens isolates than mere identification to the species level in order to verify the cause of an outbreak. Also, to increase the probability of finding the significant cpe-positive C. perfringens strains, it is very important to isolate and investigate more than one colony from the fecal culture of a patient and screen all these isolates for the presence of the cpe gene before further laboratory work is done.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12147468 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.