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Animals and spaceflight: from survival to understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164368
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2007 Jan-Mar;7(1):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
E R Morey-Holton
E L Hill
K A Souza
Author Affiliation
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035-1000, USA. eholton@mail.arc.nasa.gov
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2007 Jan-Mar;7(1):17-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Laboratory
Fractures, Bone - pathology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Larva - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena
Quail
Rats
Russia
Space Flight - history
United States
Weightlessness - adverse effects
Abstract
Animals have been a critical component of the spaceflight program since its inception. The Russians orbited a dog one month after the Sputnik satellite was launched. The dog mission spurred U.S. interest in animal flights. The animal missions proved that individuals aboard a spacecraft not only could survive, but also could carry out tasks during launch, near-weightlessness, and re-entry; humans were launched into space only after the early animal flights demonstrated that spaceflight was safe and survivable. After these humble beginnings when animals preceded humans in space as pioneers, a dynamic research program was begun using animals as human surrogates aboard manned and unmanned space platforms to understand how the unique environment of space alters life. In this review article, the following questions have been addressed: How did animal research in space evolve? What happened to animal development when gravity decreased? How have animal experiments in space contributed to our understanding of musculoskeletal changes and fracture repair during exposure to reduced gravity?
PubMed ID
17396002 View in PubMed
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An integrated management strategy to prevent outbreaks and eliminate infection pressure of American foulbrood disease in a commercial beekeeping operation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300440
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2019 Jun 01; 167:48-52
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-01-2019
Author
Barbara Locke
Matthew Low
Eva Forsgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7044, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: barbara.locke@slu.se.
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2019 Jun 01; 167:48-52
Date
Jun-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Beekeeping
Bees - microbiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Larva - microbiology
Paenibacillus larvae - physiology
Spores, Bacterial
Sweden
Abstract
The bacterial disease American Foulbrood (AFB), caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae, is considered the most contagious and destructive infectious disease affecting honeybees world-wide. The resilient nature of P. larvae bacterial spores presents a difficult problem for the control of AFB. Burning clinically symptomatic colonies is widely considered the only workable strategy to prevent further spread of the disease. Antibiotic use is banned in EU countries, and although used commonly in the U.S. and Canada, it only masks symptoms and does not prevent the further spread of the disease. Not surprisingly, there is an increased demand for chemical-free strategies to prevent and control of AFB. The aim of this study was to implement a management program with a long-term perspective to reduce infection pressure and eliminate AFB outbreaks. The study was conducted within a commercial beekeeping operation in central Sweden that has previously experienced reoccurring AFB outbreaks. For 5?years, P. larvae were cultured from adult bee samples taken in the fall. The following spring, any identified sub-clinically infected colonies were shaken onto new material and quarantined from the rest of the beekeeping operation. After the first year clinical symptoms were not again observed, and during the 5?years of the study the proportion of apiaries harbouring P. larvae spores decreased from 74% to 4%. A multinomial regression analysis also clearly demonstrated that the proportion of infected colonies with the highest levels of spore counts disproportionately declined so that by the end of the study the only remaining infected apiaries were in the lowest spore count category (the three higher spore count categories having been eradicated). These results demonstrate the importance of management practices on AFB disease epidemiology. Early detection of subclinical spore prevelance and quarantine management as presented here can provide an effective sustainable chemical-free preventive solution to reduce both the incidence of AFB outbreaks and continued transmission risk at a large-scale.
PubMed ID
31027721 View in PubMed
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Aposematism and crypsis combined as a result of distance dependence: functional versatility of the colour pattern in the swallowtail butterfly larva.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173933
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2005 Jul 7;272(1570):1315-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-2005
Author
Birgitta S Tullberg
Sami Merilaita
Christer Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, University of Stockholm, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.tullberg@zoologi.su.se
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2005 Jul 7;272(1570):1315-21
Date
Jul-7-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biological Evolution
Butterflies - physiology
Environment
Humans
Larva - physiology
Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
Photography
Pigmentation - physiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The idea that an aposematic prey combines crypsis at a distance with conspicuousness close up was tested in an experiment using human subjects. We estimated detectability of the aposematic larva of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio machaon, in two habitats, by presenting, on a touch screen, photographs taken at four different distances and measuring the time elapsed to discovery. The detectability of larvae in these images was compared with images that were manipulated, using existing colours either to increase or decrease conspicuousness. Detection time increased with distance for all colourations. However, at the closest distance, detection time was longer for the larvae manipulated to be more cryptic than for the natural and more conspicuous forms. This indicates that the natural colouration is not maximally cryptic at a short distance. Further, smaller increments in distance were needed to increase detection time for the natural than for the conspicuous larva. This indicates that the natural colouration is not maximally conspicuous at longer distances. Taken together, we present the first empirical support for the idea that some colour patterns may combine warning colouration at a close range with crypsis at a longer range. The implications of this result for the evolution of aposematism are discussed.
Notes
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Cites: Evolution. 2005 Jan;59(1):38-4515792225
PubMed ID
16006332 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of Nanophyetus salmincola schikhobalowl (Skrjiabin et Podjiapolskaja, 1931) infestation of salmonlike fishes in the rivers of the Khabarovsk Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257505
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2014 Jul-Sep;(3):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A G Dragomeretskaia
O P Zelia
O E Trotsenko
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2014 Jul-Sep;(3):25-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Humans
Kidney - parasitology
Larva - physiology
Parasite Load
Rivers - parasitology
Salmonidae - parasitology
Siberia - epidemiology
Trematoda - physiology
Trematode Infections - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission - veterinary
Abstract
Parasitological investigations of 529 specimens of 7 fish species from the water basins of the Khabarovsk Territory in 2009-2013 revealed the high extensity (11.7 to 100%) and intensity (as many as 9341 larvae per fish) of invasion with N. s. schikhobalowi metacercaria in salmonlike fishes from the mountain tributaries (Khor, Anyui, and Manoma) of the Amur river. The examined specimens of four salmonlike fish species (Thymallus tugarinae, Hucho taimen, Brachymystax tumensis and B. lenok) showed an increase in all indicators of infestation: invasion extensity (IE), invasion intensity (II), and abundance index (AI) with age. Moreover, IE peaked just in a 3-4-year-old fish (and in 1-year-old B. lenok) and further remained virtually unchanged. N. s. schikhobalowi metacercaria accumulated in the fish trunk with age, by maintaining their viability. With very high II, practically 100% infestation in B. lenok makes the population run the maximum risk of Nanophyetus infection with the dietary intake of this fish species if it is not disinfected. Examination of the distribution of N. s. schikhobalowi metacercaria in the trunk of Thymallus tugarinae showed that over 50% of larvae were detectable in the kidneys. This peculiarity of their localization could propose a simple method to determine II for Nanophyetus larvae in salmonlike fishes. Recommendations for reducing the risk of human infection with trematodes are given.
PubMed ID
25286547 View in PubMed
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[Data on the nutritional spectrum of black fly larvae]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62297
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1988 Jan-Feb;(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article

Deleterious effects of repeated cold exposure in a freeze-tolerant sub-Antarctic caterpillar.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95808
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Mar;208(Pt 5):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Sinclair Brent J
Chown Steven L
Author Affiliation
Spatial, Physiological and Conservation Ecology Group, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa. celatoblatta@yahoo.co.uk
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Mar;208(Pt 5):869-79
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Body Composition
Body Weight
Climate
Crystallization
Digestive System - pathology
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Freezing
Indian Ocean Islands
Larva - physiology
Moths - physiology
Abstract
Multiple freeze-thaw cycles are common in alpine, polar and temperate habitats. We investigated the effects of five consecutive cycles of approx. -5 degrees C on the freeze-tolerant larvae of Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Lepidoptera: Tineidae) on sub-Antarctic Marion Island. The likelihood of freezing was positively correlated with body mass, and decreased from 70% of caterpillars that froze on initial exposure to 55% of caterpillars that froze on subsequent exposures; however, caterpillars retained their freeze tolerance and did not appear to switch to a freeze-avoiding strategy. Apart from an increase in gut water, there was no difference in body composition of caterpillars frozen 0 to 5 times, suggesting that the observed effects were not due to freezing, but rather to exposure to cold per se. Repeated cold exposure did not result in mortality, but led to decreased mass, largely accounted for by a decreased gut mass caused by cessation of feeding by caterpillars. Treatment caterpillars had fragile guts with increased lipid content, suggesting damage to the gut epithelium. These effects persisted for 5 days after the final exposure to cold, and after 30 days, treatment caterpillars had regained their pre-exposure mass, whereas their control counterparts had significantly gained mass. We show that repeated cold exposure does occur in the field, and suggest that this may be responsible for the long life cycle in P. marioni. Although mean temperatures are increasing on Marion Island, several climate change scenarios predict an increase in exposures to sub-zero temperatures, which would result in an increased generation time for P. marioni. Coupled with increased predation from introduced house mice on Marion Island, this could have severe consequences for the P. marioni population.
PubMed ID
15755885 View in PubMed
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Ecological niche modeling of lyme disease in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145254
Source
J Med Entomol. 2010 Jan;47(1):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Sunny Mak
Muhammad Morshed
Bonnie Henry
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Services, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 4R4. sunny.mak@bccdc.ca
Source
J Med Entomol. 2010 Jan;47(1):99-105
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Borrelia - immunology
Borrelia burgdorferi - immunology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ecosystem
Geography
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Ixodes - growth & development - microbiology
Larva - physiology
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the geographic distribution and model the ecological niche for Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmidt, Hyde, Steigerwaldt & Brenner), Ixodes pacificus (Cooley & Kohls), and Ixodes angustus (Neumann), the bacterium and primary tick vectors for Lyme disease, in British Columbia (BC), Canada. We employed a landscape epidemiology approach using geographic information systems mapping and ecological niche modeling (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Prediction) to identify geographical areas of disease transmission risk. Forecasted optimal ecological niche areas for B. burgdorferi are focused along the coast of Vancouver Island, the southwestern coast of the BC mainland, and in valley systems of interior BC roughly along and below the N51 degree line of latitude. These findings have been used to increase public and physician awareness of Lyme disease risk, and prioritize future field sampling for ticks in BC.
PubMed ID
20180315 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nature. 2010 Jul 22;466(7305):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2010
Author
Janet Fang
Source
Nature. 2010 Jul 22;466(7305):432-4
Date
Jul-22-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Biomass
Birds - physiology
Culicidae - classification - growth & development - parasitology - physiology
Female
Food chain
Forecasting
Humans
Insect Vectors - parasitology - physiology
Larva - physiology
Male
Models, Biological
Plants - metabolism
Pollination - physiology
Population Density
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2010 Sep 2;467(7311):2720811436
Comment In: Nature. 2010 Aug 26;466(7310):104120739989
Comment In: Nature. 2010 Aug 26;466(7310):104120739988
Comment In: Nature. 2010 Aug 26;466(7310):104120739990
Comment In: Nature. 2010 Aug 26;466(7310):104120739991
PubMed ID
20651669 View in PubMed
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Effect of a fish stock's demographic structure on offspring survival and sensitivity to climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291333
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 02 07; 114(6):1347-1352
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-07-2017
Author
Leif Christian Stige
Natalia A Yaragina
Øystein Langangen
Bjarte Bogstad
Nils Chr Stenseth
Geir Ottersen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo, Norway; n.c.stenseth@ibv.uio.no l.c.stige@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 02 07; 114(6):1347-1352
Date
02-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Female
Fisheries
Gadus morhua - physiology
Geography
Larva - physiology
Male
Norway
Oceans and Seas
Ovum - physiology
Population Dynamics
Population Growth
Russia
Abstract
Commercial fishing generally removes large and old individuals from fish stocks, reducing mean age and age diversity among spawners. It is feared that these demographic changes lead to lower and more variable recruitment to the stocks. A key proposed pathway is that juvenation and reduced size distribution causes reduced ranges in spawning period, spawning location, and egg buoyancy; this is proposed to lead to reduced spatial distribution of fish eggs and larvae, more homogeneous ambient environmental conditions within each year-class, and reduced buffering against negative environmental influences. However, few, if any, studies have confirmed a causal link from spawning stock demographic structure through egg and larval distribution to year class strength at recruitment. We here show that high mean age and size in the spawning stock of Barents Sea cod (Gadus morhua) is positively associated with high abundance and wide spatiotemporal distribution of cod eggs. We find, however, no support for the hypothesis that a wide egg distribution leads to higher recruitment or a weaker recruitment-temperature correlation. These results are based on statistical analyses of a spatially resolved data set on cod eggs covering a period (1959-1993) with large changes in biomass and demographic structure of spawners. The analyses also account for significant effects of spawning stock biomass and a liver condition index on egg abundance and distribution. Our results suggest that the buffering effect of a geographically wide distribution of eggs and larvae on fish recruitment may be insignificant compared with other impacts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28115694 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of trichinellosis in the Arctic territories of a Far Eastern District of the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301962
Source
J Helminthol. 2019 Jan; 93(1):42-49
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
A Uspensky
L Bukina
I Odoevskaya
S Movsesyan
M Voronin
Author Affiliation
K.I. Skrjabin's Institute of Fundamental and Applied Parasitology of Animals and Plants,117218, 28 str. Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya,Moscow,Russia.
Source
J Helminthol. 2019 Jan; 93(1):42-49
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Helminth - blood
Aquatic Organisms - parasitology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Frozen Foods - parasitology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Larva - physiology
Meat - parasitology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Trichinella - immunology
Trichinellosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Trichinellosis, a zoonotic disease caused by nematodes of the genus Trichinella, is still a public health concern in the Arctic. The aims of this study were to investigate the seroprevalence of anti-Trichinella IgG in aboriginal peoples of two settlements in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (Russian Federation) on the Arctic coast of the Bering Sea, and to evaluate the survival of Trichinella nativa larvae in local fermented and frozen meat products. A seroprevalence of 24.3% was detected in 259 people tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The highest prevalence was detected among people who consumed traditional local foods made from the meat of marine mammals. Trichinella nativa larvae were found to survive for up to 24 months in a fermented and frozen marine mammal meat product called kopalkhen. Since the T. nativa life cycle can be completed in the absence of humans, it can be expected to persist in the environment and therefore remain a cause of morbidity in the human populations living in Arctic regions.
PubMed ID
29382411 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.