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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120514
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mary-Ann Fitzcharles
Peter A Ste-Marie
Pantelis Panopalis
Henri Ménard
Yoram Shir
Fred Wolfe
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. mary-ann.fitzcharles@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:179
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comprehension
Disability Evaluation
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC) is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and the Symptom Severity scale (SS) measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0-31), measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated.
The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated.
Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22994975 View in PubMed
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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
......................................................................................................................................... 7 Arctic Indigenous Languages Assessment Symposium .......................................................................... 7 United Nations Human Rights ................................................................................................................ 9 2014 World Conference
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3283810
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Sustainable development
Environment
Health
Mercury
Languages
Documents

merged_document__2_.pdf

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Abbreviations in Swedish Clinical Text--use by three professions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262983
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elin Lövestam
Sumithra Velupillai
Maria Kvist
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviations as Topic
Electronic Health Records - classification - statistics & numerical data
Natural Language Processing
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nutritionists - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
A list of 266 abbreviations from dieticians' notes in patient records was used to extract the same abbreviations from patient records written by three professions: dieticians, nurses and physicians. A context analysis of 40 of the abbreviations showed that ambiguous meanings were common. Abbreviations used by dieticians were found to be used by other professions, but not always with the same meaning. This ambiguity of abbreviations might cause misunderstandings and put patient safety at risk.
PubMed ID
25160281 View in PubMed
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[A bowed back will become straight and the Winter's back will become bowed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192223
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
H. Alaranta
Author Affiliation
Invalidiliiton Käpylän kuntoutuskeskus, Koskelantie 22, 00160 Helsinki. hannu.alaranta@invalidiliitto.fi
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Date
1998
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back
Back Pain - psychology
Finland
Humans
Language
Symbolism
PubMed ID
11757151 View in PubMed
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Abstract profiles of structural stability point to universal tendencies, family-specific factors, and ancient connections between languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120224
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dan Dediu
Stephen C Levinson
Author Affiliation
Language and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Dan.Dediu@mpi.nl
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Asia
Australia
Bayes Theorem
Cultural Evolution - history
Europe
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Language - history
Linguistics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the "stability profiles" of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world.
Notes
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Erratum In: PLoS One.2012;7(10). doi: 10.1371/annotation/ceff8775-a4e3-45cb-b6c9-dd62d9179d59
PubMed ID
23028843 View in PubMed
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Acceptable noise level with Danish, Swedish, and non-semantic speech materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130222
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Mar;51(3):146-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
K Jonas Brännström
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Author Affiliation
Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology Section, Department of Clinical Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jonas.brannstrom@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Mar;51(3):146-56
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Noise
Reproducibility of Results
Speech Discrimination Tests
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Acceptable noise level (ANL) has been established as a method to quantify the acceptance of background noise while listening to speech presented at the most comfortable level. The aim of the present study was to generate Danish, Swedish, and a non-semantic version of the ANL test and investigate normal-hearing Danish and Swedish subjects' performance on these tests.
ANL was measured using Danish and Swedish running speech with two different noises: Speech-weighted amplitude-modulated noise, and multitalker speech babble. ANL was also measured using the non-semantic international speech test signal (ISTS) as speech signal together with the speech-weighted amplitude-modulated noise. The latter condition was identical in both populations.
Forty Danish and 40 Swedish normal-hearing subjects.
In both populations ANL results were similar to previously reported results from American studies. Generally, significant differences were seen between test conditions using different types of noise within ears in each population. Significant differences were seen for ANL across populations, also when the non-semantic ISTS was used as speech signal.
The present findings indicate that there are extrinsic factors, such as instructions, affecting the ANL results.
PubMed ID
22023486 View in PubMed
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Acceptance by Swedish users of a multimedia program for primary and secondary prevention of malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21301
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L H Lindholm
A. Isacsson
B. Slaug
T R Möller
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Dalby/Lund, Lund University, Helgeandsgatan, Sweden.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Occupations - education
Heliotherapy - adverse effects
Humans
Language
Male
Melanoma - prevention & control
Multimedia
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Sweden, the incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin is rapidly increasing, and the disease is now one of the ten most common tumor types. The objectives were to apply multimedia techniques to increase public knowledge about malignant melanoma and its risk factors, to increase awareness of preventive measures, and to make people more disposed to change their sunbathing habits. METHODS: A trilingual (Swedish, English, and German) multimedia program was developed for two target groups, health care personnel and the general public, with a total of >500 "pages" in each language. User reactions were studied on-site at a municipal pharmacy and library, where the program was available in a kiosk with touch-screen. RESULTS: Practically all 274 users interviewed found the program easy to use and understand. 92% identified one or more of the recommendations given. 66% found the program information "worrying," and 29%--mainly young women-instantly declared that they were going to change their sun-exposure behaviors. No correlation to skin type was found. CONCLUSIONS: A multimedia program of the present design seems to be a useful tool for health promotion.
PubMed ID
9883779 View in PubMed
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[Access of French-speaking elderly to nursing homes among minorities, a linguistic challenge for health and greater welfare].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129806
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Eric Forgues
Michel Doucet
Josée Guignard Noël
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. eric.forgues@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Date
Dec-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication Barriers
Health Services Accessibility
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Language
Minority Groups
New Brunswick
Nursing Homes
Abstract
Access to long-term nursing homes by French-speaking seniors in minority situations is a very real problem. However, few studies have been conducted on this subject. We wanted to better understand this issue in New Brunswick while taking into account the language aspect. In this article, we will present the problem based on different issues encountered by Francophones in minority situations and by giving an overview of the studies conducted on French-speaking seniors in minority situations. We will then address the issue related to the rights of French-speaking senior to receive services in French in nursing homes by analyzing briefly the province's legal requirements. Furthermore, we will present the regulatory framework of nursing homes in New Brunswick. Finally, we will provide a geographic analysis of existing New Brunswick nursing homes while taking into account the language aspect, the levels of service and the distribution of French-speaking seniors within the territory.
PubMed ID
22067633 View in PubMed
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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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1246 records – page 1 of 125.