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379 records – page 1 of 38.

21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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The 1300-year dynamics of vegetation cover in the Lake Shira depression (Khakassia, Siberia, Russia) reconstructed on the basis of bottom sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263196
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Jul;457(1):248-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
K E Vershinin
D Yu Rogozin
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Jul;457(1):248-51
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Biomass
Geologic sediments
Lakes
Paleontology
Plant Physiological Processes
Siberia
PubMed ID
25172593 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation and distribution of 137Cs and 90Sr radionuclides in the components of water-bottom sediments-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263700
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):650-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
K V Kablova
V V Deryagin
S G Levina
A A Sutyagin
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):650-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Lakes
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This research work is devoted to analyzing the processes of accumulation and distribution of long-lived radionuclides of 90Sr and 137Cs in the components of water-sediment-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky (Chelyabinsk region). The characteristic features of redistribution of radioactive substances, depending on the texture of the bottom sediments of the lake and the species composition of aquatic vegetation are shown. Also shown is the total stock of radionuclides in water and bottom sediments. The coefficients of 90Sr and 137Cs accumulation in bottom sediments and macrophytes have been calculated.
PubMed ID
25980292 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of lead (Pb) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) from a lake downstream a former shooting range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279581
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Espen Mariussen
Lene Sørlie Heier
Hans Christian Teien
Marit Nandrup Pettersen
Tor Fredrik Holth
Brit Salbu
Bjørn Olav Rosseland
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antimony - analysis
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Copper - analysis
Firearms
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gills - chemistry
Kidney - chemistry
Lakes
Lead - analysis
Norway
Sports
Trout - blood - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Zygote - chemistry - drug effects
Abstract
An environmental survey was performed in Lake Kyrtj?nn, a small lake within an abandoned shooting range in the south of Norway. In Lake Kyrtj?nn the total water concentrations of Pb (14?g/L), Cu (6.1?g/L) and Sb (1.3?g/L) were elevated compared to the nearby reference Lake Stitj?nn, where the total concentrations of Pb, Cu and Sb were 0.76, 1.8 and 0.12?g/L, respectively. Brown trout (Salmo trutta) from Lake Kyrtj?nn had very high levels of Pb in bone (104mg/kg w.w.), kidney (161mg/kg w.w.) and the gills (137mg/kg d.w), and a strong inhibition of the ALA-D enzyme activity were observed in the blood (24% of control). Dry fertilized brown trout eggs were placed in the small outlet streams from Lake Kyrtj?nn and the reference lake for 6 months, and the concentrations of Pb and Cu in eggs from the Lake Kyrtj?nn stream were significantly higher than in eggs from the reference. More than 90% of Pb accumulated in the egg shell, whereas more than 80% of the Cu and Zn accumulated in the egg interior. Pb in the lake sediments was elevated in the upper 2-5cm layer (410-2700mg/kg d.w), and was predominantly associated with redox sensitive fractions (e.g., organic materials, hydroxides) indicating low potential mobility and bioavailability of the deposited Pb. Only minor amounts of Cu and Sb were deposited in the sediments. The present work showed that the adult brown trout, as well as fertilized eggs and alevins, may be subjected to increased stress due to chronic exposure to Pb, whereas exposure to Cu, Zn and Sb were of less importance.
PubMed ID
27770648 View in PubMed
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[Activity and structure of the sulfate-reducing bacterial community in the sediments of the southern part of Lake Baikal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259583
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):180-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
N V Pimenov
E E Zakharova
A L Briukhanov
V A Korneeva
B B Kuznetsov
T P Turova
T V Pogodaeva
G V Kalmychkov
T I Zemskaia
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):180-90
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Lakes - microbiology
Microbial Consortia - physiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Siberia
Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The rates of sulfate reduction (SR) and the diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were studied in the sediments of the Posol'skaya banka elevation in the southern part of Lake Baikal. SR rates varied from 1.2 to 1641 nmol/(dm3 day), with high rates (> 600 nmol/(dm3 day)) observed at both deep-water stations and in subsurface silts. Integral SR rates calculated for the uppermost 50 cm of the sediments were higher for gas-saturated and gas hydrate-bearing sediments than in those with low methane content. Enrichment SRB cultures were obtained in Widdel medium for freshwater SRB. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene fragments from clone libraries obtained from the enrichments revealed the presence of SRB belonged to Desulfosporosinus genus, with D. lacus as the most closely related member (capable of sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate reduction), as well as members of the order Clostridiales.
PubMed ID
25423722 View in PubMed
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Aeromonas aquatica sp. nov., Aeromonas finlandiensis sp. nov. and Aeromonas lacus sp. nov. isolated from Finnish waters associated with cyanobacterial blooms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269272
Source
Syst Appl Microbiol. 2015 May;38(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
R. Beaz-Hidalgo
F. Latif-Eugenín
M J Hossain
K. Berg
R M Niemi
J. Rapala
C. Lyra
M R Liles
M J Figueras
Source
Syst Appl Microbiol. 2015 May;38(3):161-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aeromonas - classification - isolation & purification
Cluster analysis
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
Finland
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Lakes - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Abstract
Three groups of Aeromonas strains isolated from Finland lakes experiencing cyanobacterial blooms could not be assigned to any known species of this genus on the basis of 16S rRNA and rpoD gene sequences. The Multilocus Phylogenetic Analysis (MLPA) of the concatenated sequence of seven genes (gyrB, rpoD, recA, dnaJ, gyrA, dnaX and atpD; 4093bp) showed that the three groups of strains did not cluster with any known Aeromonas spp. and formed three independent lineages. This was confirmed by performing the analysis with their closest relatives using 15 genes (the latter 7 and cpn60, dnaK, gltA, mdh, radA, rpoB, tsf, zipA; 8751bp). Furthermore, ANI results between the genomes of the type strains of the three potential new species and those of their close relatives were all
PubMed ID
25852023 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Ligulidae) plerocercoids and probability of its usage for the calculation of host death rate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261046
Source
Parazitologiia. 2014 May-Jun;48(3):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Pronin
S V Pronina
Source
Parazitologiia. 2014 May-Jun;48(3):245-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Cestoda - physiology
Cestode Infections - mortality
Cyprinidae - physiology
Fish Diseases - mortality - parasitology
Lakes - parasitology
Siberia
Abstract
Results of special parasitological dissections of roach samples from catches with the same fishing gear and at the same station (Monakhovo Cove, Chivyrkui Bay of the Lake Baikal) and at the same time in different years (1998-2002) are given. Stability of age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalisis in different years with the maximum of prevalence and mean abundance in fish of 3+ age, and the following sharp decrease in these rates in elder age groups, was revealed. Basing on prevalence decreasing of a single roach generation, the rate of fish mortality during its growth from age group 3+ to 4+ was estimated as 15.9-20.7%.
PubMed ID
25693329 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agroenvironmental determinants associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in beach waters in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132370
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
P. Turgeon
P. Michel
P. Levallois
P. Chevalier
D. Daignault
B. Crago
R. Irwin
S A McEwen
N F Neumann
M. Louie
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. patricia.turgeon@umontreal.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bathing Beaches
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Human Activities
Humans
Lakes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Quebec
Seasons
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Exposure to microorganisms resistant to antimicrobials may constitute a health risk to human populations. It is believed that one route of exposure occurs when people engage in recreational activities in water contaminated with these microorganisms. The main objective of this study was to explore population-level and environmental determinants specifically associated with the presence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) generic Escherichia coli isolated from recreational waters sampled from beaches located in southern Quebec, Canada. Water samples originated from the Quebec provincial beach surveillance program for the summers of 2004 and 2005. This study focused on three classes of determinants, namely: agricultural, population-level and beach characteristics for a total of 19 specific factors. The study was designed as a retrospective observational analysis and factors were assessed using logistic regression methods. From the multivariable analysis, the data suggested that the percentage of land used for spreading liquid manure was a significant factor associated with the presence of AMR E. coli (OR=27.73). Conceptually, broad factors potentially influencing the presence of AMR bacteria in water must be assessed specifically in addition to factors associated with general microbial contamination. Presence of AMR E. coli in recreational waters from beaches in southern Quebec may represent a risk for people engaging in water activities and this study provides preliminary evidence that agricultural practices, specifically spreading liquid manure in agricultural lands nearby beaches, may be linked to the contamination of these waters by AMR E. coli.
PubMed ID
21824340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alder, Nitrogen, and Lake Ecology: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in the Postglacial History of Lone Spruce Pond, Southwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284914
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Bianca B Perren
Yarrow Axford
Darrell S Kaufman
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alnus - growth & development - metabolism
Animals
Biota
Climate
Climate change
Diatoms - physiology
Ecosystem
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Lakes - chemistry
Nitrogen - metabolism
Picea - growth & development - metabolism
Ponds - chemistry
Soil
Abstract
Diatoms, combined with a multiproxy study of lake sediments (organic matter, N, d15N, d13C, biogenic silica, grain size, Cladocera and chironomids, Alnus pollen) from Lone Spruce Pond, Alaska detail the late-glacial to Holocene history of the lake and its response to regional climate and landscape change over the last 14.5 cal ka BP. We show that the immigration of alder (Alnus viridis) in the early Holocene marks the rise of available reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the lake as well as the establishment of a primarily planktonic diatom community. The later establishment of diatom Discostella stelligera is coupled to a rise of sedimentary d15N, indicating diminished competition for this nutrient. This terrestrial-aquatic linkage demonstrates how profoundly vegetation may affect soil geochemistry, lake development, and lake ecology over millennial timescales. Furthermore, the response of the diatom community to strengthened stratification and N levels in the past confirms the sensitivity of planktonic diatom communities to changing thermal and nutrient regimes. These past ecosystem dynamics serve as an analogue for the nature of threshold-type ecological responses to current climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (Nr) deposition, but also for the larger changes we should anticipate under future climate, pollution, and vegetation succession scenarios in high-latitude and high-elevation regions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28076393 View in PubMed
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Algae biomass cultivation in nitrogen rich biogas digestate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272211
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;72(10):1723-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
I. Krustok
J G Diaz
M. Odlare
E. Nehrenheim
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;72(10):1723-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonium Compounds - metabolism
Biofuels
Biomass
Lakes
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Microalgae - growth & development - metabolism
Nitrogen - metabolism
Sweden
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
Because microalgae are known for quick biomass growth and nutrient uptake, there has been much interest in their use in research on wastewater treatment methods. While many studies have concentrated on the algal treatment of wastewaters with low to medium ammonium concentrations, there are several liquid waste streams with high ammonium concentrations that microalgae could potentially treat. The aim of this paper was to test ammonium tolerance of the indigenous algae community of Lake Mälaren and to use this mixed consortia of algae to remove nutrients from biogas digestate. Algae from Lake Mälaren were cultivated in Jaworski's Medium containing a range of ammonium concentrations and the resulting algal growth was determined. The algae were able to grow at NH4-N concentrations of up to 200 mg L(-1) after which there was significant inhibition. To test the effectiveness of the lake water algae on the treatment of biogas digestate, different pre-cultivation set-ups and biogas digestate concentrations were tested. It was determined that mixing pre-cultivated suspension algae with 25% of biogas digestate by volume, resulting in an ammonium concentration of around 300 mg L(-1), produced the highest algal growth. The algae were effective in removing 72.8±2.2% of NH4-N and 41.4±41.4% of PO4-P.
PubMed ID
26540532 View in PubMed
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379 records – page 1 of 38.