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Climate change, wellbeing and resilience in the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck: The moccasin telegraph goes global

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96605
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1333
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Lemelin, H
Matthews, D
Mattina, C
McIntyre, N
Johnston, M
Koster, R
Weenusk First Nation At Peawanuck
Author Affiliation
School of Outdoor Recreation, Parks and Tourism, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. harvey.lemelin@lakeheadu.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1333
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Canadian sub-Arctic
Climate change
Cree
Hudson Bay
Knowledge systems
Lakehead University
Northern Ontario
Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck
Abstract
The Cree of Northern Ontario, Canada, have proved resilient and adaptable to social and environmental changes. However, the rapidity of climate change impacts in the Hudson Bay Lowlands of the Canadian sub-Arctic is challenging this resiliency. A collaborative project conducted with the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck and researchers at Lakehead University used the concept of wellbeing to explore the impact of climate change on current subsistence activities, resource management, and conservation strategies, while considering the implications of globalization on climate change awareness. This article describes the analysis of 22 interviews conducted with members of the Weenusk First Nation at Peawanuck. Findings indicate that residents are concerned with a variety of changes in the environment and their ability to use the land. For example, they noted changes in travel routes on water and land, often attributing these to geomorphic changes in the coastal landscapes along Hudson Bay. They also noted the disappearance of particular insects and bird species, and variations in the distribution of particular fauna and flora. Possible impacts of these changes on the community's wellbeing and resiliency are examined. Another major theme that arose from the analysis was the impact of traditional modes of communication (eg traditional knowledge, radio, newspaper) and newer forms (eg satellite television and the internet) on Indigenous people's understanding of climate change. Given that few researchers have acknowledged or recognized the globalization of the moccasin telegraph (ie the traditional mode of communication between First Nations), a discussion of this phenomenon and its significance for understanding emerging knowledge systems in small, remote First Nation communities is central to this article.
PubMed ID
20568911 View in PubMed
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