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Anti-listerial inhibitory lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial cold smoked salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80840
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Tomé Elisabetta
Teixeira Paula
Gibbs Paul A
Author Affiliation
Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, R. Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibiosis
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food contamination - analysis
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Lactobacillus - growth & development - physiology
Listeria - growth & development
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Salmon - microbiology
Seafood - microbiology
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The natural microflora of cold-smoked fish at the end of shelf-life are lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Some of these display a capacity to inhibit spoilage as well as several strains of pathogenic micro-organisms, e.g. Listeria monocytogenes which is isolated frequently from cold-smoked salmon (CSS). Eight batches of sliced vacuum-packed CSS from Norway, Scotland and Spain were collected at retail. Packs were stored at 5 degrees C and examined for chemical and microbiological characteristics, at purchase date and at expiration date. pH, water activity and salt content were similar to available data on lightly preserved fish products. There was a consistent pattern in the development of the microflora on CSS; the initial level of LAB was low on freshly produced CSS (10(2) cfu g(-1)); however, storage in vacuum packaging at refrigeration temperature was elective for LAB. At the end of the stated shelf-life these micro-organisms, represented mainly by Lactobacillus spp., attained ca.10(7) cfu g(-1) while Enterobacteriaceae counts were consistently lower (10(5) cfu g(-1)), which indicates the ability of LAB to grow and compete with few carbohydrates available and in the presence of moderate salt concentrations. L. monocytogenes was not found in any sample. Forty-one percent of LAB strains isolated exhibited inhibitory capacity against Listeria innocua, in a plate assay. A majority of the inhibitory effects were non-bacteriocinogenic, but nevertheless were very competitive cultures which may provide an additional hurdle for improved preservation by natural means.
PubMed ID
16943030 View in PubMed
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Five-year incidence of caries, salivary and microbial conditions in 60-, 70- and 80-year-old Swedish individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75776
Source
Caries Res. 1998;32(3):166-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Fure
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Sweden. fure@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Caries Res. 1998;32(3):166-74
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Buffers
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Caries - epidemiology - microbiology
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Forecasting
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Incidence
Lactobacillus - growth & development - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Root Caries - epidemiology - microbiology
Saliva - microbiology - physiology - secretion
Secretory Rate
Streptococcus mutans - growth & development - physiology
Streptococcus sobrinus - growth & development - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Xerostomia - epidemiology
Abstract
The 5-year incidence of dental caries in a random sample of 60-, 70- and 80-year-old inhabitants of Goteborg was related to salivary and microbial conditions. Of the 208 persons examined at baseline, 148 (71%) participated in the follow-up examination; 69, 51 and 28, respectively, in the different age groups. The study revealed that 27% of the participants had not developed any carious lesions during the 5-year period and that the incidence of coronal and root caries increased with age. In the 60-year-olds, 2.5% of the susceptible coronal and root surfaces, respectively, had decayed, while the corresponding figures for the 80-year-olds were 8.8% for coronal surfaces and 9.8% for root surfaces. In all, 18% had an unstimulated saliva secretion rate of below 0.1 ml/min and 14% had a stimulated secretion rate of or = 10(6) CFU/ml in saliva and the corresponding figures for > or = 10(5) lactobacilli counts were 22, 31 and 43%. In the stepwise regression analysis, it was found that age, salivary levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli and number of teeth were the best predictors of the incidence of root caries. In conclusion, these observations indicate that there is an increased risk of dental caries with age owing to unfavourable microbial and salivary conditions.
PubMed ID
9577981 View in PubMed
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