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Dynamics of antibody nuclease activity in blood of women during pregnancy and lactation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63488
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2003 Aug;68(8):890-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
V N Buneva
A N Kudryavtseva
A V Gal'vita
V V Dubrovskaya
O V Khokhlova
I A Kalinina
V A Galenok
G A Nevinsky
Author Affiliation
Novosibirsk Institute of Bioogranic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2003 Aug;68(8):890-900
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Catalytic - blood - immunology - metabolism
DNA - blood - metabolism
Endonucleases - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology - metabolism
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology - metabolism
Lactation - immunology
Pregnancy
RNA - blood - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroiditis, Autoimmune - blood - immunology - metabolism
Abstract
In human milk we previously found catalytic antibodies (abzymes) catalyzing hydrolysis of DNA, RNA, NMP, NDP, and NTP and also phosphorylation of proteins and lipids. In the present study we have analyzed nuclease activities of antibodies in blood of women during pregnancy and lactation. Blood of healthy male and female volunteers lacked catalytically active antibodies, whereas antibodies from blood of pregnant women hydrolyzed DNA and RNA and their relative activity varied over a wide range. Relative blood abzyme activities significantly increased after delivery and at the beginning of lactation. The highest abzyme activity was observed in blood of parturient women. Although the dynamics of changes in antibody DNase activity during pregnancy was rather individual for each woman, there was a common trend in the increase in antibody activity in the first and/or third trimester of the pregnancy. The DNase activity of IgG and IgM from blood of healthy pregnant women was 4-5 times less than that from pregnant women with pronounced autoimmune thyroiditis.
PubMed ID
12948390 View in PubMed
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Maternal determinants of neonatal immune response to ovalbumin: effect of breast feeding on development of anti-ovalbumin antibody in the neonate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57808
Source
Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol. 1989;89(1):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
Y. Okamoto
J. Freihorst
P L Ogra
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo.
Source
Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol. 1989;89(1):83-9
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn - immunology
Female
Immunity, Maternally-Acquired
Immunization
Immunization, Passive
Immunoglobulin Isotypes - biosynthesis
In Vitro
Lactation - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Pregnancy
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
Inbred Brown-Norway female rats were immunized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) or sham-immunized 14 days before and 10 days after mating. In subsequent studies with OVA, babies fed by immunized mothers, regardless of whether they were born from immunized or sham-immunized mothers, showed suppression of IgG, IgM and IgE anti-OVA responses. In additional studies, these babies developed OX-8-positive but W3/25-negative phenotypic suppressor T-cells specific for anti-OVA antibody production. However, these regulatory cells did not react with OVA itself when tested for in vitro proliferative response to OVA. Subsequent immunization of the neonates with OVA appeared to abrogate suppression of IgG and IgM antibody responses. However, maternally induced suppression of IgE persisted and was not influenced by subsequent immunization.
PubMed ID
2786508 View in PubMed
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Poliovirus antibody titres, relative affinity, and neutralising capacity in maternal milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64858
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1993 Feb;68(2):198-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
S. Zaman
B. Carlsson
A. Morikawa
S. Jeansson
I. Narayanan
K. Thiringer
F. Jalil
L A Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Paediatrics, King Edward Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1993 Feb;68(2):198-201
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Comparative Study
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
India
Japan
Lactation - immunology
Milk, Human - immunology
Pakistan
Polioviruses - immunology
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Varying titres of secretory IgA antibodies to poliovirus type 1 were found previously in the milk of unvaccinated, lactating Pakistani mothers during two different years, reflecting the antigenic exposure on mucosal membranes. To study further the changes in the extent and the form of antigenic exposure reflected in the human milk, human milk samples from Pakistani, Indian, Japanese, and Swedish mothers were collected. The quality and the neutralising capacity of the antibodies was also studied. Secretory IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies to poliovirus type 1 were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and relative affinity was measured in ELISA by elution with potassium thiocyanide. Microneutralisation tests were also performed. The higher secretory IgA antibody titres to poliovirus type 1 in the unvaccinated, naturally exposed Pakistani and Indian mothers' milk, compared with the Swedish and Japanese mothers, presumably reflect the epidemiological situation in these countries. Neutralising capacity and the relative antibody affinity seemed to be higher both in the Pakistani mothers and the group without natural exposure but only given inactivated poliovirus vaccine, that is the Swedish mothers, than the group meeting only live vaccine strains, that is the Japanese mothers.
PubMed ID
8386918 View in PubMed
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