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Antimicrobial action of some GRAS compounds against Vibrio vulnificus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217449
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):549-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y. Sun
J D Oliver
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte 28223.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):549-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Benzoates - pharmacology
Benzoic Acid
Butylated Hydroxyanisole - pharmacology
Butylated Hydroxytoluene - pharmacology
Diacetyl - pharmacology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Lactates - pharmacology
Lactic Acid
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ostreidae - microbiology
Parabens - pharmacology
Propionates - pharmacology
Propyl Gallate - pharmacology
Seafood
Sorbic Acid - pharmacology
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Vibrio - drug effects - pathogenicity
Abstract
Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium indigenous to estuarine waters and is known to be a significant human pathogen. Infections are generally associated with the consumption of raw oyster. In an attempt to identify possible antimicrobial agents against this organism that might be used in foods, ten compounds that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the FDA were tested against both the opaque and translucent morphotypes of V. vulnificus. Eight of those compounds had a lethal effect for both morphotypes of this bacterium. Diacetyl had the lowest lethal concentration (50 ppm) of the GRAS compounds tested within 24 h. Lactic acid and butylated hydroxyanisole possessed lethal activities at 300 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively, within 3 h. The mode of action of lactic acid against V. vulnificus appears to be an effect primarily of pH, while the antimicrobial activities of diacetyl and BHA appeared not to be affected by pH. No significant differences were found for opaque to translucent, or from translucent to opaque switching, in examining the possible effects of the GRAS compounds on colonial morphology.
PubMed ID
7835469 View in PubMed
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Effect of potassium lactate and a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate blend on Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaged sliced ham.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160564
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Oct;70(10):2297-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
L A Mellefont
T. Ross
Author Affiliation
Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia. lyndal.mellefont@utas.edu.au
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Oct;70(10):2297-305
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Food contamination - analysis
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Food Preservatives - pharmacology
Humans
Lactates - pharmacology
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sodium Acetate - pharmacology
Swine
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Two commercially available organic acid salts, potassium lactate (PURASAL HiPure P) and a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate blend (PURASAL Opti. Form PD 4), were assessed as potential inhibitors of Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) sliced ham in challenge studies. The influence of the initial inoculation level of L. monocytogenes (10(1) or 10(3) CFU g(-1)) and storage temperature (4 or 8 degrees C) was also examined. The addition of either organic acid salt to MAP sliced ham strongly inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes during the normal shelf life of the product under ideal refrigeration conditions (4 degrees C) and even under abusive temperature conditions (i.e., 8 degrees C). During the challenge studies and in the absence of either organic acid salt, L. monocytogenes numbers increased by 1000-fold after 20 days at 8 degrees C and 10-fold after 42 days at 4 degrees C. Both organic acid salt treatments were found to be listeriostatic rather than listericidal. The addition of either organic acid salt to the MAP ham also reduced the growth of indigenous microflora, i.e., aerobic microflora and lactic acid bacteria. The influence of these compounds on the risk of listeriosis in relation to product shelf life is discussed.
PubMed ID
17969611 View in PubMed
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