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(3)H activity comparison between FTMC, VNIIM and LNE-LNHB.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278451
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Philippe Cassette
Paulius Butkus
Arunas Gudelis
Tatiana Shilnikova
Source
Appl Radiat Isot. 2016 Mar;109:41-3
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
France
Internationality
Laboratories - standards
Lithuania
Nuclear Medicine - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Scintillation Counting
Sensitivity and specificity
Tritium - analysis - standards
Abstract
An activity comparison of tritiated water was organized in 2013 between 3 laboratories: FTMC (Lithuania), LNE-LNHB (France) and VNIIM (Russia). The solution was prepared by LNHB and ampoules were sent to the others laboratories. This solution was standardized in terms of activity per unit mass by participant laboratories using the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method in liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The tritiated water solution is traceable to the solution prepared by LNHB for the CCRI(II)-K2.H-3 2009 (3)H international comparison.
PubMed ID
26651170 View in PubMed
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Academic and nonacademic laboratories perform equally on CIQC immunohistochemistry proficiency testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113089
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Zhongchuan Will Chen
Heather Neufeld
Maria A Copete
John Garratt
C Blake Gilks
Emina E Torlakovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Immunohistochemistry - standards
Laboratories - standards
Laboratory Proficiency Testing - standards
Paraffin Embedding
Pathology - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Tissue Array Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Workload
Abstract
To test whether academic centers (ACs) are more successful than nonacademic centers (NACs) in immunohistochemistry (IHC) external quality assessment challenges in the Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control (CIQC) program.
Results of 9 CIQC challenges for breast cancer marker (BM) and various non-breast cancer marker (NBM) tests were examined. Success rates were compared between AC/NAC laboratories and those located in small or large cities. Performance was also correlated with annual IHC case volumes.
There was no statistically significant difference in performance in any of the comparisons. However, overall performance on BM was significantly better (P
PubMed ID
23765534 View in PubMed
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[Accreditation should be discussed! Need for substance abuse testing at the workplace should be increased]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1998
Author
O. Beck
P. Hjemdahl
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Karolinska laboratoriet, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Date
Jan-28-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Substance Abuse Detection - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
9492489 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a provincial quality control program: a 9-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221090
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 May;31(5):1275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A M Mackenzie
H. Richardson
P. Missett
D E Wood
D J Groves
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1993 May;31(5):1275-9
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Methicillin Resistance
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Quality Control
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Abstract
We report the results of a province-wide quality control program in which five methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were circulated to all Ontario laboratories (hospital, private, and public health laboratories) on nine occasions between 1980 and 1989. The level of expression of methicillin resistance in each of the isolates was determined by performing viable colony counts on serial dilutions of methicillin in agar, and each isolate was assigned to an expression class according to previous published criteria (A. Tomasz, S. Nachman, and H. Leaf, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 35:124-129, 1991). Over this time there was an improvement in the performance of laboratories in the recognition of three strains that were relatively easy to detect (strains B, C, and E). These strains were of expression class II, and 98% of laboratories reported correct identifications in 1986. Performance in identifying two strains (strains A and D) of expression class I remained poor. Strain A was circulated in two surveys in 1987 and 1989, and laboratories were sent a questionnaire requesting details of the methods used in those two surveys. The methods used by the laboratories were classified into three categories: disk diffusion, single-plate screening by agar incorporation, and automated methods, which included premanufactured MIC panels. Between the 1987 and 1989 surveys, there was no change in the performance of the disk diffusion test (60% correct on both occasions), but there was improvement in the sensitivity of the agar incorporation test (36% correct in 1987 and 84% correct in 1989) and in automated methods (43% correct in 1987 and 79% correct in 1989). Over a decade, there was overall improvement in the performance of laboratories in detecting easy-to-detect strains, but there were difficulties in detecting organisms of low expression class, and an organism of very low expression class should be designated as a control organism for routine testing of methicillin-resistant s. aureus isolates.
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1991 Jan;35(1):124-92014967
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1989 Sep-Oct;12(5):385-942533050
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jan;36(1):6-91590701
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jul;36(7):1367-731510429
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jul;36(7):1585-61510460
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1972 Feb;109(2):844-75058455
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1983 Nov;18(5):1084-916643661
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1983 Nov;18(5):1226-366605976
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Jun;19(6):813-76565707
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Sep;20(3):494-96490833
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1986 May;23(5):832-93011847
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1986 Nov;24(5):764-93639887
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1987 Apr;25(4):734-53571481
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1987 Aug;88(2):231-53618554
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 1988 Apr;1(2):173-863069195
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 4;320(18):1188-962651925
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989 Jul;33(7):995-92675760
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989 Nov;33(11):1869-742610497
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1992 Jan;36(1):25-311375449
PubMed ID
8501229 View in PubMed
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Actual practice vs guidelines in laboratory monitoring of older patients with primary hypothyroidism in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169851
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2006 Feb;18(1):34-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Seija I Eskelinen
Raimo E Isoaho
Sirkka-Liisa Kivelä
Kerttu M Irjala
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkiisenkatu 1, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland. seija.eskelinen@utu.fi
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2006 Feb;18(1):34-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Guidelines as Topic
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hypothyroidism - blood - therapy
Laboratories - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone - blood
Thyroxine - blood - therapeutic use
Abstract
Clinical guidelines are produced in order to achieve an acceptable standard of care, especially for patients with common diseases in primary care. The treatment of primary hypothyroidism serves as an example of the content of clinical guidelines and actual practice. The aim of this study was to compare the follow-up of primary hypothyroidism by thyroid function tests, serum TSH and serum-free T4, in older patients managed in primary care, with recommendations in treatment guidelines and textbooks.
Participation rate 82% (n=1260), mean age 74 years, (range 64-100 yrs). Patients with primary hypothyroidism were identified by means of cross-sectional survey (Lieto Study 1998-1999) and 4-year retrospective collection of laboratory database medical records (1994-1998), performed in autumn 2003.
In most stable (=treated for more than 14 months) thyroxine users, both serum TSH (mean 1.4 measurements/year) and serum-free T4 (mean 0.8 measurements/year) values were measured over the 4-year period of thyroxine treatment. 66.4% of serum TSH and 85.3% of serum-free T4 values were within normal range. 41.7% of serum-free T4 determinations had been performed without indication (=with TSH in normal range).
Compared with the recommended testing frequency given in various guidelines, a considerable number of extra measurements, especially serum-free T4, were performed. However, some key issues in the recommendations were difficult to interpret, and the age or other main characteristics of the patient were not taken into consideration adequately.
PubMed ID
16608134 View in PubMed
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Analytical challenges and solutions in doping control: a perspective from the Swedish Doping Control Laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278254
Source
Bioanalysis. 2016 Apr;8(8):735-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016

An evaluation of autoimmune antibody testing patterns in a Canadian health region and an evaluation of a laboratory algorithm aimed at reducing unnecessary testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117498
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2013 May;32(5):601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Ada Man
Kam Shojania
Carmen Phoon
Jason Pal
Monika Hudoba de Badyn
David Pi
Diane Lacaille
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. adaman@bu.edu
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2013 May;32(5):601-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Antibodies, Antinuclear - blood
Antigens, Nuclear - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
British Columbia
Cost-Benefit Analysis
DNA - immunology
Health Care Costs
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regional Medical Programs - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - economics - standards
Abstract
Autoantibody tests are often ordered inappropriately. We aimed to evaluate the ordering patterns of these tests in our local health region and to develop a laboratory algorithm aimed at reducing unnecessary tests. Laboratory data including the number and sequence of tests, ordering physician specialties and results for antinuclear (ANA), extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) and anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody tests from 2007 to 2009 were evaluated. Based on this information and a clinical consensus meeting, an algorithm was developed and applied retrospectively to 1 year of inpatient laboratory data to simulate potential cost savings. We identified a large volume of these autoantibody tests performed, equating to testing costs of $862,706.72, where less than 17 % of each were positive. Repeated ANA tests were mostly ordered after a previously negative result, and 1 % of patients with negative results changed to =1:160 on repeat testing. Close to half of all ENA and anti-dsDNA tests that were ordered were done so simultaneously with ANA, suggesting their use as screening tests. This was done more frequently in the inpatient setting. An algorithm was developed where ENA and anti-dsDNA tests would be cancelled if ANA was negative in the same sample. ANA repeated within 1 year would be cancelled and the prior result provided. Application of the algorithm retrospectively simulated a 30 % cost savings. Repeat testing and simultaneous ordering of multiple tests contributed to the excessive ordering of autoantibody tests in our health region. Our proposed algorithm would reduce testing costs and should be accompanied by appropriate educational information for physicians.
PubMed ID
23292519 View in PubMed
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An overview of quality control practices in Ontario with particular reference to cholesterol analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202363
Source
Clin Biochem. 1999 Mar;32(2):93-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
S. Krishnan
S. Webb
A R Henderson
C M Cheung
D J Nazir
H. Richardson
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 1999 Mar;32(2):93-9
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Cholesterol - analysis
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Ontario
Quality Control
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program (LPTP) assesses the analytical performance of all licensed laboratories in Ontario. The LPTP Enzymes, Cardiac Markers, and Lipids Committee conducted a "Patterns of Practice" survey to assess the in-house quality control (QC) practices of laboratories in Ontario using cholesterol as the QC paradigm.
The survey was questionnaire-based seeking information on statistical calculations, software rules, review process and data retention, and so on. Copies of the in-house cholesterol QC graphs were requested. A total of 120 of 210 laboratories were randomly chosen to receive the questionnaires during 1995 and 1996; 115 laboratories responded, although some did not answer all questions.
The majority calculate means and standard deviations (SD) every month, using anywhere from 4 to >100 data points. 65% use a fixed mean and SD, while 17% use means calculated from the previous month. A few use a floating or cumulative mean. Some laboratories that do not use fixed means use a fixed SD. About 90% use some form of statistical quality control rules. The most common rules used to detect random error are 1(3s)/R4s while 2(2s)/4(1s)/10x are used for systematic errors. About 20% did not assay any QC at levels >5.5 mmol/L.
Quality control data are reviewed daily (technologists), weekly and monthly (supervisors/directors). Most laboratories retain their QC records for up to 3 years on paper and magnetic media. On some QC graphs the mean and SD, QC product lot number, or reference to action logs are not apparent. Quality control practices in Ontario are, therefore, disappointing. Improvement is required in the use of clinically appropriate concentrations of QC material and documentation on QC graphs.
PubMed ID
10211624 View in PubMed
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[A reply on MedAnalys: Illumination of the role of health care authorities would be valuable].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199253
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 2;97(5):494
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-2000
Author
S. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Medilab AB, Täby. sigvard.eriksson@medilab.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 2;97(5):494
Date
Feb-2-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Administration
Humans
Journalism, Medical
Laboratories - standards
Malpractice
Medical Errors
Specimen Handling
Sweden
PubMed ID
10707504 View in PubMed
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100 records – page 1 of 10.