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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):201-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hoffa James P
Author Affiliation
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, USA.
Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):201-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
International Cooperation
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Politics
United States
Abstract
There's tremendous excitement across the land about good jobs and a clean environment. We teamsters have found that working together makes things happen. We have found a partnership with the Sierra Club and Public Citizen. We no longer support drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We'll pass the Employee Free Choice Act, too. Working together as partners, labor and environmentalists, and under this President, we can accomplish great things for working people and for the environment.
PubMed ID
19608515 View in PubMed
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Commentary: professionalism, unionization, and physicians' strikes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133914
Source
Acad Med. 2011 May;86(5):548-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Richard L Cruess
Sylvia R Cruess
Author Affiliation
Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. richard.cruess@mcgill.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2011 May;86(5):548-51
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Professional Competence
Professional Practice - organization & administration
Social Change
Social Values
Strikes, Employee - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
Professionalism is the basis of medicine's social contract with society. The details of that contract are influenced by the presence or absence of a national health plan. In countries with such a plan, unlike in the United States, negotiations are dictated by the nature of medicine's contract with society and take place between the medical profession and society directly. This system has required that medicine be represented at the negotiating table, and, in most instances, it has resulted in the unionization of physicians. To influence these negotiations, the medical profession has used various forms of collective action, including strikes. As the United States continues on the path toward health care reform, it seems likely that the American medical profession will also require an organization to represent it at the negotiating table and will be under the same pressures to strike as are physicians in other countries. Because both unionization and strikes pose potential threats to the professionalism of students, residents and practicing physicians, such issues should be a part of the medical education curriculum at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The authors briefly review the literature on strikes and job actions and share personal experiences to support this discussion. Students and residents should have an opportunity to consider these issues in a safe environment, both to understand the potential impact of a strike on patients and the profession and to determine their own personal course of action should such a situation arise.
Notes
Comment On: Acad Med. 2011 May;86(5):580-521436671
PubMed ID
21646971 View in PubMed
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Digging into construction: social networks and their potential impact on knowledge transfer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123436
Source
Work. 2012;42(2):223-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N A Carlan
D M Kramer
P. Bigelow
R. Wells
E. Garritano
P. Vi
Author Affiliation
Centre of Research Expertise for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders, Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada. ncarlan@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Work. 2012;42(2):223-32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Canada
Construction Industry - manpower
Decision Making, Organizational
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Information Systems - organization & administration
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Musculoskeletal Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Safety Management - methods - standards
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Social Networking
Workload - standards
Abstract
A six-year study is exploring the most effective ways to disseminate ideas to reduce musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the construction sector. The sector was targeted because MSDs account for 35% of all lost time injuries. This paper reports on the organization of the construction sector, and maps potential pathways of communication, including social networks, to set the stage for future dissemination.
The managers, health and safety specialists, union health and safety representatives, and 28 workers from small, medium and large construction companies participated.
Over a three-year period, data were collected from 47 qualitative interviews. Questions were guided by the PARIHS (Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services) knowledge-transfer conceptual framework and adapted for the construction sector.
The construction sector is a complex and dynamic sector, with non-linear reporting relationships, and divided and diluted responsibilities. Four networks were identified that can potentially facilitate the dissemination of new knowledge: worksite-project networks; union networks; apprenticeship program networks; and networks established by the Construction Safety Association/Infrastructure Health and Safety Association.
Flexible and multi-directional lines of communication must be used in this complex environment. This has implications for the future choice of knowledge transfer strategies.
PubMed ID
22699189 View in PubMed
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Establishing consensus about the baccalaureate entry-to-practice policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182241
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2003 Dec;42(12):546-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ann Rhéaume
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences and Community Services, Université de Moncton, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada E1A 3E9. rheauma@umoncton.ca
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2003 Dec;42(12):546-52
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Conflict (Psychology)
Consensus
Curriculum
Decision Making, Organizational
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Leadership
New Brunswick
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Education Research
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Policy
Questionnaires
School Admission Criteria
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
This article is based on the results of a qualitative study examining educational reforms in New Brunswick, Canada, during the 1980s. Using the province of New Brunswick as a case study, three issues related to the baccalaureate entry-to-practice policy are examined. First, the process of upgrading nursing education to a baccalaureate degree and the conflict this change created between the Nurses Association of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Nursing Union are described. Second, the reasons leaders of the professional nursing organization desired to upgrade nursing education are examined, and third, the issues underlying the conflict over nursing education are discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Nurs Educ. 2004 Mar;43(3):10015072334
PubMed ID
14694995 View in PubMed
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A glimpse into 30 years of struggle against prostitution by the women's liberation movement in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146920
Source
Reprod Health Matters. 2009 Nov;17(34):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Agnete Strøm
Author Affiliation
The Women's Front of Norway, Bergen, Norway. agnetest@online.no
Source
Reprod Health Matters. 2009 Nov;17(34):29-37
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Erotica - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Feminism
Humans
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Norway
Politics
Prostitution - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Policy
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence
Women's Rights
Abstract
The Women's Front of Norway has worked against prostitution for 30 years. In 2008 a law criminalizing the purchase of a sexual act was passed in Norway. This article describes the struggle and the main actors in lobbying for the law. In the 1980s, we raised awareness of prostitution and trafficking in women in a study of the pornography industry, and targeted sex tourist agencies organizing trips to the Philippines and Thailand. In the 1990s, our members in trade unions got their unions to take a stand against prostitution and against legalizing prostitution as "work". In 2006, the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions Congress supported a law criminalizing the buyer of a sexual act; this had a strong impact on the centre-left coalition Government. We invited leaders of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women to Norway to meet parliamentarians and trade unionists, and kept up the pressure. From the start, the focus was on ensuring that the situation for women in prostitution was ameliorated. Our demands have been for better social services and job training. Street prostitution, especially in Oslo, has been curbed, and a growth in the indoor market has not been reported. Our next task is participating in the awareness campaign "Buying Sex is not a Sport" in connection with the Soccer World Cup, South Africa, 2010.
PubMed ID
19962635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Good jobs, green jobs, eh? A Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149622
Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):225-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Andy King
Author Affiliation
United Steelworkers, Canada.
Source
New Solut. 2009;19(2):225-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Employment
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Abstract
A group of Canadians pondered the dramatic change in momentum in the United States and began to think more concretely about strategies to bring unions and environmentalists together around a common green economic agenda. The campaign against toxic chemicals has proven to be a natural meeting place for labor and environmental activists. We share a common history and concern about the lack of effective regulation. The more challenging areas are about transition, the need for good jobs, and a viable economic strategy.
PubMed ID
19608521 View in PubMed
Less detail

Labour-management forums and workplace performance. Evidence from union officials in health care organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186990
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Terry H Wagar
Kent V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
Department of Management, St Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Committee Membership
Consumer Satisfaction
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Administration - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Labor Unions - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Leadership
Organizational Culture
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Workplace
Abstract
Many health care workplaces are adopting more cooperative labour-management relations, spurred in part by sweeping changes in the economic environment that have occurred over the last decade. Labour-management cooperation is seen as essential if health care organizations are to achieve their valued performance objectives. Joint labour-management committees (LMCs) have been adopted in many health care workplaces as a means of achieving better industrial relations. Using data from a sample of Canadian union leaders in the health care sector, this paper examines the impact of labour-management forums and labour climate on employee and organizational outcomes. Research results suggest that labour climate is less important in predicting workplace performance (and change in workplace performance) than is the number of LMCs in operation. However, labour climate is found to be at least as important in predicting union member satisfaction (and change in member satisfaction) as is the wide adoption of LMCs in operation. These findings are consistent with the notion that the greater use of LMCs is associated with augmented workplace performance (and a positive change in workplace performance), notwithstanding the contribution of the labour climate in the workplace.
PubMed ID
12534164 View in PubMed
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[Now principles have hit hard again but women may strike for equality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74332
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Aug 12;6(13-14):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-1982
Author
M. Lundqvist
Source
Vardfacket. 1982 Aug 12;6(13-14):8-9
Date
Aug-12-1982
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Occupations
Humans
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Sweden
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
6924508 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nurses' shop stewards and their collaboration with management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150864
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2009;23(1):23-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Anne-Mette Hjalager
Morten Lassen
Tage Bilo
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. anne-mette.hjalager@advance1.dk
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2009;23(1):23-37
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Denmark
Hospital Administration
Humans
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Services - organization & administration
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Personnel Management
Abstract
This study investigates the collaboration between Danish nurses' shop stewai-ds and workplace management. The aim of the study is to track changes in workplace climate after a major structural reform of the health sector.
The data source for the study is a comprehensive survey among union representatives in the health and care sectors.
Generally, and not surprisingly, shops stewards maintain closer relations and a higher degree of loyalty to the nearest managers rather than management at higher levels in the hierarchy. It can also be demonstrated that more experienced shop stewards, those who have been employed in this position and in the workplace for the longest terms have more affirmative relations to management than less experienced shop stewards with shorter tenure. Those shop stewards who spend much time on the entitled duties are rewarded with positive collaboration with management. Hard times at the workplace and dissatisfied colleagues, who do not support their union representative, often result in less rewarding relations with management. Quite unexpectedly, the intensity of relations with management is not significantly related to structural or other changes that the workplace has experienced over the past two years. Changes are therefore accepted as inevitable and regular occurrences in the health sector.
The response rate is very high in the survey. Further qualitative research may reveal details about the background and implications. PRACTICAL IMPLICATION: The study suggests that many shop stewards may suffer from a competence gap in terms of more advanced new public management strategies and tools. This gap has not yet been successfully filled by the services and training activities offered by the Danish Nurses Union.
Results from the study are being taken on board in the union's strategies. The evidence is also helpful for the managers in the health sector, as they are seeking to develop a constructive the collaboration with the unions.
PubMed ID
19455876 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.