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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and preferences of young women with low and high fear of childbirth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102768
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1495-505
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Kathrin Stoll
Wendy A Hall
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Nov;23(11):1495-505
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Choice Behavior
Fear
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined constructions of labor and birth for 461 Canadian women who attended the University of British Columbia (Canada) and participated in an online survey about pregnancy and birth, using a combination of Likert items and open-ended questions. We performed a content analysis of women's open-ended responses about their feelings toward birth and analyzed comments of women with high and low fear of childbirth separately. Students with high fear of birth described childbirth as a frightening and painful ordeal and viewed obstetric interventions as a means to make labor and birth more manageable. Students with low fear constructed birth as a natural event and regarded interventions more critically. Students in both groups supported women's autonomous maternity care decisions. Our findings contribute to care providers' and educators' knowledge about preferences and fears expressed by the next generation of maternity care consumers and potential strategies to reduce their fear of childbirth.
PubMed ID
24108088 View in PubMed
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[Cesarean section--a woman's choice or physician's responsibility?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64019
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Oct 20;96(42):4549-50, 4553
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1999
Author
E L Ryding
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken, Nordvästra Skåne.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Oct 20;96(42):4549-50, 4553
Date
Oct-20-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Making
Ethics, Medical
Fear
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Physician's Role
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
10575862 View in PubMed
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Cesarean section on maternal request: reasons for the request, self-estimated health, expectations, experience of birth and signs of depression among first-time mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77777
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(4):451-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Wiklund Ingela
Edman Gunnar
Andolf Ellika
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ingela.wiklund@bb.ptj.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(4):451-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Breast Feeding - epidemiology - psychology
Cesarean Section - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Parity
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Self Concept
Social Support
Surgical Procedures, Elective - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate first-time mothers undergoing cesarean section in the absence of medical indication, their reason for the request, self-estimated health, experience of delivery, and duration of breastfeeding. We also aimed to study if signs of depression postpartum are more common in this group. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study 357 healthy primiparas from two different groups, "cesarean section on maternal request" (n=91) and "controls planning a vaginal delivery" (n=266) completed three self-assessment questionnaires in late pregnancy, two days after delivery and 3 months after birth. Symptom scores from the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale at three months after birth were also investigated. RESULTS: Women requesting cesarean section experienced their health ass less good (p
PubMed ID
17486467 View in PubMed
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Childbirth customs in Orthodox Jewish traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202572
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:682-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
K. Bodo
N. Gibson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences and Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:682-6
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Judaism
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Obstetrics - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Abstract
To describe cultural beliefs of Orthodox Jewish families regarding childbirth in order to help family physicians enhance the quality and sensitivity of their care.
These findings were based on a review of the literature searched in MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Science Abstracts (1984 to present). Interviews with several members of the Orthodox Jewish community in Edmonton, Alta, and Vancouver, BC, were conducted to determine the accuracy of the information presented and the relevance of the paper to the current state of health care delivery from the recipients' point of view.
Customs and practices surrounding childbirth in the Orthodox Jewish tradition differ in several practical respects from expectations and practices within the Canadian health care system. The information presented was deemed relevant and accurate by those interviewed, and the subject matter was considered to be important for improving communication between patients and physicians. Improved communication and recognition of these differences can improve the quality of health care provided to these patients.
Misunderstandings rooted in different cultural views of childbirth and the events surrounding it can adversely affect health care provided to women in the Orthodox Jewish community in Canada. A basic understanding of the cultural foundations of potential misunderstandings will help Canadian physicians provide effective health care to Orthodox Jewish women.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1997 Feb;71(2):113-219138953
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1995 May;24(4):327-317643264
Cites: J Nurse Midwifery. 1980 Sep-Oct;25(5):39-426902767
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1993 Dec;53(6):1359-658250053
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jan 1;146(1):29-331728349
Cites: Mod Midwife. 1994 Sep;4(9):11-47953810
PubMed ID
10099807 View in PubMed
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The childbirth experience: a study of 295 new mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64435
Source
Birth. 1996 Sep;23(3):144-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
U. Waldenström
I M Borg
B. Olsson
M. Sköld
S. Wall
Source
Birth. 1996 Sep;23(3):144-53
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Attitude to Health
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Nurse Midwives
Obstetric Labor Complications - etiology
Pain - etiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The childbirth experience is multidimensional, and therefore difficult to describe and explain. Studies of it have produced inconsistent findings, and the phenomenon is often confused with satisfaction with the care provided. This study aimed to clarify different aspects of the birth experience, and to identify factors that could explain the variation in women's overall assessment of it. METHODS: All Swedish-speaking women in a large city who gave birth during a two-week period in 1994 were given a questionnaire one day after the birth, and 295 (91%) of the questionnaires were returned. Information about the labor process and medical interventions was collected from hospital records. RESULTS: Women usually experienced severe pain and various degrees of anxiety, and most were seized with panic for a short time or some part of their labor. Despite these negative feelings, most women felt greatly involved in the birth process, were satisfied with their own achievement, and thought they had coped better than expected. The overall experience was assessed as positive by 77 percent of women and negative by 10 percent. No statistical difference was observed between primiparas and multiparas in total birth experience, and few differences in the specific aspects of the birth. Of the 38 variables tested in regression analysis, the six that contributed to explaining women's overall birth experience were support from the midwife (sensitivity to needs), duration of labor, pain, expectations of the birth, involvement and participation in the birth process, and surgical procedures (emergency cesarean section, vacuum extraction, forceps, episiotomy). CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that negative and positive feelings can coexist, thus confirming the multidimensional character of the birth experience. Women's assessment of their childbirth is influenced by both physical and psychosocial factors, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive approach to care in labor.
PubMed ID
8924100 View in PubMed
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A comparative study in Stockholm, Sweden of labour outcome and women's perceptions of being referred in labour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63606
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Sep;18(3):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Ingela Wiklund
A-S Matthiesen
Birgitta Klang
Anna-Berit Ransjö-Arvidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Danderyd Hospital S- 182 88, Stockholm, Sweden. ingela/wiklund@bb.ptf.se
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Sep;18(3):193-9
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Anecdotes
Comparative Study
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to study the outcome of labour and women's perceptions of being referred after onset of labour. DESIGN: a comparative study carried out between October 1998 and April 1999. SETTING: prospective parents in Stockholm, Sweden are offered a choice of which of the five hospitals in which they want to give birth. In reality, there is a lack of maternity beds in Stockholm to implement this policy and therefore nearly 10% of labouring women are being referred during labour. PARTICIPANTS: the study population was selected from one of the five hospitals. Included in the study were 266 labouring women, with a 37-42 weeks uncomplicated pregnancy, fetus presenting by the vertex and spontaneous onset of labour. During pregnancy, all the women had chosen the same labour ward where they planned to deliver. However, at the onset of labour half of the women, case group I (n = 133) were referred to another maternity unit due to lack of space in the labour ward. For every referred woman a control woman matched for age, parity and date of delivery was selected, with the same inclusion criteria, except being referred, control group II (n = 133). METHODS: a questionnaire with closed and open questions was posted to the women after birth and used to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the outcome of labour and the women's perceptions of referral during labour. FINDINGS: routines such as epidural analgesia (EDA) (p
PubMed ID
12381423 View in PubMed
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A comparison of women's memories of care during pregnancy, labour and delivery after stillbirth or live birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58874
Source
Midwifery. 1998 Jun;14(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
I. Rådestad
C. Nordin
G. Steineck
B. Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Centre of Caring Sciences North (CWN), Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Midwifery. 1998 Jun;14(2):111-7
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - psychology
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Memory
Mothers - education - psychology
Patient Education - methods
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy - psychology
Prenatal Care - methods
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare women's reports of aspects of their care during pregnancy, labour and delivery following stillbirth and live birth. DESIGN: Data were collected by postal questionnaire in 1994. SETTING: A Swedish nation-wide population-based study of cohorts defined in 1991. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred and fourteen women with stillbirth (subjects) and 322 women with live birth (controls). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Labour and delivery were assessed as physically 'insufferably hard' by 52 (17%) of the subjects and 33 (10%) of the controls. The corresponding figures for emotional strains were 144 (47%) and 21 (7%). Obstetric analgesia was more frequently used during labour for stillbirth. One hundred and thirty-eight (44%) subjects, as compared to 44 (2%) of the controls, left hospital within 24 hours of birth. Almost all the women with stillbirth 296 (95%) stated that it was important to have an explanation of the baby's death. Adverse events related to bromocriptine given to inhibit postpartum lactation, were reported by 60 (22%) of the subjects. KEY CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to ease the distress of labour and delivery for stillbirth. Discussion of the aetiology of the baby's death with the mother should be a priority. The optimal length of stay in hospital after stillbirth remains to be defined. Non-pharmacological inhibition of lactation may be presented as an alternative to bromocriptine, breast binding is a concrete 'reality confrontation' for the woman and may aid her in her grieving process. Further studies concerning breast binding vs pharmacological inhibition of lactation and long-term psychological outcome are warranted.
PubMed ID
10382480 View in PubMed
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Content of childbirth-related fear in Swedish women and men--analysis of an open-ended question.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82711
Source
J Midwifery Womens Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;51(2):112-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eriksson Carola
Westman Göran
Hamberg Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå. carola.eriksson@fammed.umu.se
Source
J Midwifery Womens Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;51(2):112-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The content of childbirth-related fear as described by 308 women and 194 men was analyzed and compared in relation to intensity of fear. The content of fear was similarly described by women and men and concerned the following main categories: the labor and delivery process, the health and life of the baby, the health and life of the woman, own capabilities and reactions, the partner's capabilities and reactions, and the professionals' competence and behavior. Among women, the labor and delivery process was the most frequently reported among the 6 categories of fears, whereas the health and life of the baby was the most frequent among the men. Fears related to own capabilities and reactions were described significantly more often by women with intense fear than by women with mild to moderate fear. The greatest difference between men with intense versus mild to moderate fear was a more frequent expression of concern for the health and life of the woman. Both women and men had fears related to not being treated with respect and not receiving sufficient medical care. This finding suggests that part of the problem with childbirth-related fear is located within the health care system itself.
PubMed ID
16504908 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive use and family planning after labor in the European part of the Russian Federation: 2-year monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191483
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2001 Dec;6(4):219-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
E. Vikhlyaeva
E. Nikolaeva
A. Brandrup-Lukanow
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2001 Dec;6(4):219-26
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Contraception Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Family Planning Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Pregnancy
Russia
Abstract
To explore the main determinants of the reproductive behavior of nursing mothers, all inhabitants of the central part of the European region of the Russian Federation, their use of modern contraceptive methods and their attitude to future family planning.
Open cohort multicenter study of 1200 nursing mothers aged 16-42 years interviewed at 3-5 days' postpartum, with subsequent longitudinal monitoring ofthe majority in the local family planning centers during the 2 years after labor.
The main determinants of the reproductive behavior of this cohort of women are an early debut of sexual activity, several partners in their reproductive history, relatively early marriage with a motivation to have one child in their family and the tendency to use induced abortion as one of the methods of birth regulation. Our experience of postpartum counselling demonstrated positive changes in the women's attitudes to modern contraceptive methods. The data reveal that the induced abortion rate among 639 mothers regularly followed-up during the first year postpartum was 4.4%, and among 606 during the second year was 5.1%. The corresponding rates among 129 women who did not visit the family planning centers and who were only interviewed 2 years after labor were 9.3% and 8.5%, respectively.
Our data show that the unmet needs are remarkably concentrated among women who have given birth within the last year or two, and who need augmented attention from the family planning and reproductive health services.
PubMed ID
11848651 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.